Food Storage Do-Over Week 12: Comfort Foods

We are excited to be starting week 12 of our Food Storage Do-Over 2015! If you didn’t catch last week’s post which talked about fruits and vegetables you can see it here.

Remember this is a 17 week process that we will be going through together. If you want to join in with the group on Facebook click here. If you’d like to receive email notifications of each week’s do-over assignment you can join our mailing list here. Or you can always post in the blog comments with your progress as well! It is so much more fun and motivating doing it as a group so find a way to connect!
week12face

In BabyStep 9: Comfort Foods we discuss supplementing your core long term food storage items any comfort foods that would be pleasant to have should you be forced to live off your food storage for a long time (chocolate, pickles, spices, condiments, etc).

If you are brand new to food storage, you may not have thought about the logistics of actually having to LIVE off of your storage. If you have no spices to flavor your soups, they won’t be very enjoyable. If you add a few treats or desserts your kids may have a much easier time adjusting. Here are some tasks to help you get started on your comfort foods:

To Do This Week

  1. Pick a few favorite desserts and purchase the ingredients you would need to make them
  2. Make a list of snacks and treats that your family likes. Stock up on them!
  3. Make a plan for spices. Start with having at least one spare of each spice in your pantry. You can buy these over time as spices can be expensive.
  4. Make a plan for condiments. Start with having at least two spares of everything you use (mustard, ketchup, soy sauce, etc.) For things you go through quickly, maybe store a few extras.
  5. Consider buying a Foodsaver to help repackage chocolates, crackers, etc. You can really extend the shelf life if you seal them in bags or in canning jars.

Comfort Food Ideas

  • Home-made popcorn in a pot
  • Mashed potatoes with instant potatoes and GRAVY
  • Hard Candy
  • Chocolate
  • Pudding (made using dry milk)
  • Granola bars
  • Fruit snacks for children
  • Chicken noodle soup in a can (for if you get sick)
  • Kool-aid
  • Condiments (ketchup, mustard, bbq sauce, salsa, pickles)
  • Spices (inventory what spices you use and store an extra one or two of each)
  • No-bake cookies or “bites” (view recipe)
  • Rice Krispie Treats
  • Chocolate and butterscotch baking chips for homemade cookies or snacking
  • Peppermint tea bags
  • Ovaltine
  • Danish dessert (w/frozen raspberries)
  • Homemade peach pie
  • Homemade cinnamon rolls

These are all just ideas. Obviously they aren’t all that healthy, necessary to sustain life, or totally “food storage” types of foods – but hey, everyone needs a little comfort food sometimes! Adjust to meet your own families needs and preferences.

Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

If you already have a lot of food storage, you may have many comforts already on hand. Let’s take some time this week to inventory, re-evaluate, re-purchase, and add to our supplies! Here are some tips to help you think of ways you can do that:

Spices:

  • Take an inventory of your spices, make sure you have at least one spare of each spice
  • Consider printing out a list of ways to make your own spice mixes to save on the number of things you need to store (store extras of the core ingredients)
  • Take some time and organize your spice cabinet, maybe consider getting a new spice rack to help make things easier to find

Condiments:

  • Take an inventory of your condiments, make sure you have at least two spares of each one
  • Look into ways to make your own condiments using basic storage ingredients (this ebook may help)
  • Make sure to have an inventory tracking plan in place so you can replenish when you open one up to start using it

Desserts/Snacks:

  • Take an inventory of your desserts and snacks, add any items you may be running low on (cake mixes, brownies, etc.)
  • Look at the shelf life of your snack items. Do you need to consider repackaging for longer term storage? (Foodsaver vacuum sealers can help with that)
  • Make a list of shelf stable family favorite desserts and store ALL of the ingredients you need for them

Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

SPICY SHELF:  This spice rack and organizer will make your spice storage space in your pantry much more organized.
FOODSAVER VACUUM SEALERS:  These are great units for repackaging crackers and cookies in bags, or vacuum sealing chocolates, nuts, and other candies in canning jars.

helpful
Here are some resources both from us and all over the web that can help you if you want more depth on any areas or are looking for even more ideas of items to include in your plans. It’s always a good idea to look at multiple approaches and decide what will work best for you! And don’t forget to check out the discussions on our facebook group to catch anything we are missing or see what others are doing!

PINTEREST BOARD FOR COMFORT FOODS
Spice Up Your Comfort Foods – from Food Storage Made Easy
25 Ways to Organize Spices – from Craftionary.net
Storing Herbs and Spices for Long Term Storage – from Are We Crazy or What
Homemade Spices Mixes – from Rainy Day Food Storage
How to Dry Herbs – from Happy Money Saver
Condiment List – from Food Storage Made Easy
Never Buy Condiments Again (eBook)
Food Storage Recipe Ideas (scroll down for desserts/snacks) – from Food Storage Made Easy

Please pin and get your friends joining in too!

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Helius Rocket Stove

titan-title
We recently had the opportunity to meet with Kris from Titan Ready USA and he showed us some of his products that we are excited to share with you. These products are simple but efficient solutions to some preparedness dilemmas we know we have faced and you may have as well. This post covers the Helius Rocket Stove, but be sure to check out the HERC tea light ovens as well.

Scroll to the to bottom of the post to see a GREAT introductory deal offered only to our Food Storage Made Easy readers.

helius

We’ve seen a lot of rocket stoves around but this is the first one we have seen that we’ve been really excited to use. This one sits high off the ground and has a great solid base you can cook on without bending over or needing a steady, safe surface to place the stove on. We love that you can use this stove to pressure can, camp, or in an emergency situation. Also this stove can use such a variety of fuels!

Here is a video of us being introduced to the Helius Rocket Stove with Kris:

Helius Rocket Stove

Cook complete meals using nothing but wood scraps and yard debris with the Helius Rocket Stove. The Helius Rocket Stove is a durable, clean alternative to outdoor cooking, using readily available scraps as fuel instead of more costly alternatives like propane or briquettes. The design of the rocket stove heats to cooking temperatures in only a few minutes with only as much fuel as fits in the fuel magazine.

  • Above ground, no crouching to cook
  • Can you it to pressure can your meats if power goes out and your freezer is compromised
  • Large enough to do things with larger pots
  • Very stable and heavy duty
  • Legs are workable to allow for level cooking surface
  • Flammable biomass – burn anything from wood scraps to dry, yard debris
  • Can vary temperatures with amount of wood
  • Quick-release ash drop means you can keep cooking while clearing the chimney of accumulated ash
  • Produces a clean burn – little or no smoke
  • Made by Americans for Americans​

SPECIAL INTRO PRICING FOR OUR READERS


For a limited time (until April 15) receive HUGE discounts on the Helius. Use COUPON CODE: foodstorage to save $67 off a Helius!

HELIUSCOUPON

HERC Tea Light Candle Ovens

titan-title
We recently had the opportunity to meet with Kris from Titan Ready USA and he showed us some of his products that we are excited to share with you. These products are simple but efficient solutions to some preparedness dilemmas we know we have faced and you may have as well. This post covers the HERC tea light ovens, but be sure to check out the Helius Rocket Stove as well.

Make sure to scroll to the to bottom of the post to see a GREAT introductory deal offered only to our Food Storage Made Easy readers.

herc

While butane stoves are great for stove-top cooking indoors, we have yet to find a good solution for oven cooking indoors. Having a diversified preparedness plan is great to cover yourself in different scenarios. For example, a Sun Oven is great if you don’t have any fuel, but not so great if it’s rainy or you’re trying to be discreet in a crisis. That’s why we recommend having different options. All have their pro’s and con’s.

Here is a video of us being introduced to the HERC XXL with Kris:

The HERC tea light ovens are great for many reasons:

  • Can be used indoors
  • The XXL acts as an oven
  • The Eco acts as a crock pot or dehydrator
  • Can be used discreetly
  • You can fit a standard 9 by 13 pan in the larger one (this is huge)
  • Can get 4 hours of cook time out of 20 tealights in the XXL
  • The fuel is fairly inexpensive, about 40 cents per cooking hour
  • You can store tealights inside safely, indefinitely, and legally
  • The thermal energy cooks the food evenly
  • The stove folds down for easy storage
  • Made by Americans for Americans​

HERC XXL Oven

The HERC XXL Oven is the larger oven. Inside cooking dimensions: 18 inch x 11.75 inch x 7.25 inch. Cook anything, anytime, anywhere, regardless of the situation. Bake, cook and dehydrate without the use of electricity or gas, indoors or out. The HERC is extremely portable, durable and economical. The HERCules (Home Emergency Radiant Cooking)™ XXL Oven harnesses the thermal energy from tea light candles, storing it in quarry stones and releasing radiant energy back into your food.
HERCMORE

Eco HERC Oven

The Eco HERC oven is the smaller oven. Inside cooking dimensions: 11.75 inch x 11.75 inch x 6 inch Cook anything, anytime, anywhere, regardless of the situation. Bake, cook and dehydrate without the use of electricity or gas, indoors or out. The Eco HERC is extremely portable, durable and economical. The Eco HERC harnesses the thermal energy from tea light candles by releasing radiant energy back into your food.
ECOHER

SPECIAL INTRO PRICING FOR OUR READERS


For a limited time (until April 15) receive HUGE discounts on the Herc Tea Light Ovens. Use COUPON CODE: foodstorage to save $90 off the XXL Herc Oven or $42 off the ECO Herc Oven.

HERCCOUPON

Food Storage Do-Over Week 11: Fruits and Vegetables

We are excited to be starting week 11 of our Food Storage Do-Over 2015! If you didn’t catch last week’s post which talked about baking ingredients you can see it here.

Remember this is a 17 week process that we will be going through together. If you want to join in with the group on Facebook click here. If you’d like to receive email notifications of each week’s do-over assignment you can join our mailing list here. Or you can always post in the blog comments with your progress as well! It is so much more fun and motivating doing it as a group so find a way to connect!

WEEK11FAC

In BabyStep 8: Fruits and Vegetables we discuss supplementing your core long term food storage items with some produce. There are many different ways of storing fruits and vegetables to increase their shelf life which we will be going over this week.

startingfromscratch

If you are brand new to food storage, you may have noticed that when looking at food storage calculators, fruits and vegetables are often left off. This is because you can sustain life with the ingredients on those calculators (you can sprout a number of those ingredients to get fresh vegetable sources). HOWEVER, we HIGHLY recommend storing fruits and vegetables for the health benefits, variety, and to help you save money on your day to day grocery shopping.

Determine How Much to Store

  • Look at your family’s typical produce usage to get an idea for how much to store
  • Plan for vegetables you would use in meals
  • Plan for fruits you would use in meals and desserts
  • Decide how many servings of fruits and vegetables you would like for side dishes each day and multiply it by however many month’s supply you are storing for

Determine Which Preservation Technique to Use

  • Freezing: Requires storage space in a spare freezer, very little preparation involved, not great in case of a powerless emergency.
  • Canning: Fairly simple process, requires a little bit of equipment plus the cost of jars and lids, shelf-life 1-2 years, control of preservatives added, store carefully in case of earthquakes.
  • Dehydrating: Initial investment is relatively expensive, fairly simple process, shelf life is quite long especially if items are vacuum-sealed, easy to store in small spaces.
  • Freeze-Drying: Very large upfront cost, best method for longest shelf life of preserved foods, newer technology so not a lot of tutorials about it yet.

Purchase Necessary Items

  • Gardening and growing your own fruits and vegetables can be a great way to acquire them at a lower cost. Initial costs of starting a garden are low. You can also purchase fruits and vegetables in bulk when things are on sale. (use Deals to Meals to find the best prices in your area)
  • Invest in some canning or dehydrating equipment, you can view some of our favorite brands in the products section below.
  • If you are not interested in preserving your own foods we recommend purchasing high quality freeze-dried fruits and vegetables. You’ll want brands that taste good and have a long shelf life. We love the unadvertised fruit and veggie packages from Thrive Life that you can only buy at our special consultant link.

Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

If you already have some fruits and vegetables in your food storage and feel somewhat comfortable with them, step outside your comfort zone and try something new:

  • Gardening: If you haven’t already tried growing a garden, make it a goal to start some plants this week. You don’t need a fancy garden area to do this. You can even do it in pots on your porch!
  • Canning: If you’ve never canned before, try canning something basic like strawberry jam. If you are a pro-canner we encourage you to pick something NEW and try canning it this season. You can view some of our canning tutorials at this link.
  • Dehydrating: If you’ve never dehydrated before, give it a try, you can even dehydrate in your oven at a low temperature if you just want to get a feel for it. If you are a dehydrating pro, pick something new to try dehydrating this week.
  • Using your foods: A lot of times we buy or preserve food and don’t get around to using it before it goes bad. Make an effort this week to practice using your foods in your every day recipes and snacks. You will find what you like and don’t like, and make sure you are rotating properly.

Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

THRIVE LIFE SPECIAL PACKAGES: Fruit and Vegetable Combo Packs available only through Thrive Life consultants, may be ordered exclusively using our special online link.
TATTLER CANNING LIDS: The tattler lids are reusable canning lids that include a plastic lid and a rubber gasket that provides a similar seal to traditional canning lids. It’s nice to not have to throw away the disposable ones after each use.
PRESTO PRESSURE CANNER:  The Presto 16-quart pressure canner is more than adequate for any home canning needs. It’s a professional-quality tool, made of heavy-duty aluminum, with stay-cool handles and a strong-lock steel lid. Safe for canning on glass-top stoves.
EXCALIBUR FOOD DEHYDRATOR:  The Excalibur is the finest dehydrator made. It is the ONLY machine with the unique Parallexx™ Horizontal Airflow Drying System. With sizes to fit any family’s needs, you can find the perfect, high-quality dehydrator for you.
FOODSAVER VACUUM SEALERS:  If you are dehydrating your own foods, a vacuum sealer can help to extend the shelf life on them. You can also get a jar attachment and seal items in mason jars.

helpful
Here are some resources both from us and all over the web that can help you if you want more depth on any areas or are looking for even more ideas of items to include in your plans. It’s always a good idea to look at multiple approaches and decide what will work best for you! And don’t forget to check out the discussions on our facebook group to catch anything we are missing or see what others are doing!

GARDENING PINTEREST BOARD
Gardening Posts from Food Storage Made Easy

CANNING PINTEREST BOARD
Canning Posts from Food Storage Made Easy

DEHYDRATING PINTEREST BOARD
Dehydrating Posts from Food Storage Made Easy

Please pin and get your friends joining in too!

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Food Storage Do-Over Week 10: Baking Ingredients

We are excited to be starting week 10 of our Food Storage Do-Over 2015! If you didn’t catch last week’s post which talked about legumes and meats you can see it here.

Remember this is a 17 week process that we will be going through together. If you want to join in with the group on Facebook click here. If you’d like to receive email notifications of each week’s do-over assignment you can join our mailing list here. Or you can always post in the blog comments with your progress as well! It is so much more fun and motivating doing it as a group so find a way to connect!

WEEK10FACE

In BabyStep 7: Baking Ingredients we discuss storing baking ingredients. These are the ingredients that will allow you to make complete recipes using the grains and legumes you have been accumulating.

startingfromscratch

If you are brand new to food storage, take a look at our article “What Can You Do With YOUR Food Storage” to see what additional items you can make by adding specific baking ingredients to your storage.

This week your assignment is to purchase foods from the last four basic food groups and learn more about how to use them.

Fats and Oils

  • Your main source of fat will be oils. Store the oil that your family uses as rotation will be important. If you can’t rotate through fast enough you may need to throw some away and replenish when it expires
  • Other sources of fats can come from things like peanut butter, mayonnaise, and salad dressings. Think about your meal plans from your three month supply, you may already have some of these in your storage.

Sugars

  • The bulk of recommended sugar storage is in white sugar. If you don’t normally eat white sugar in your diet you can substitute with other sweeteners such as maple syrup, agave, etc.
  • Other sugars you can store are brown sugar, powdered sugar, drink mixes, syrup, honey, corn syrup, molasses, etc. Again, what you choose to store will depend on what your family will be able to use and rotate based on your own recipes.

Powdered Milk/Other Dairy

  • Powdered milk is critical to food storage as it can be life-sustaining if that is ALL you have to eat. It is especially important if you have babies or young children.
  • Other powders can be helpful to bring variety to your meals such as powdered eggs, sour cream, peanut butter, cream cheese, butter, etc. Buy a few of these in small amounts and see if they work in your recipes and then store accordingly.

Miscellaneous Baking Items

  • The regular baking items shouldn’t be forgotten. Store plenty of yeast, salt, baking powder, baking soda, etc. Consider that when you are living off of your food storage you will be baking a lot of foods from scratch, so you will need more of these on hand than you would normally have.
  • We recommend storing in multiple smaller containers so that when you open them to rotate you don’t have them lose their effectiveness if you don’t get through them fast enough.

Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

updating

If you already have some of these baking ingredients stored and feel somewhat comfortable with them step outside your comfort zone and try something new:

  • Review your inventory list from week 7 and replenish any items from the fats, milk, sugars, and miscellaneous sections that you don’t have your full supply of.
  • Try using some of your powder substitutes that you may not have experimented with already.
  • Print recipes you use often if you only have them on the computer.
  • Try using powdered milk to make either buttermilk, evaporated milk or sweetened condensed milk. Here are some tips for making those substitutions:

    Buttermilk: Mix up one cup of powdered milk. Add 1 T. lemon juice or vinegar to the milk. Stir it in and wait for 5 minutes. Use in any recipe that calls for buttermilk!

    Sweetened Condensed Milk: Add the following ingredients to your blender. 1/2 cup of hot water, 1 c. of powdered milk powder, 1 c. of sugar, 1 T. of butter. Blend very well.

    Evaporated Milk: Mix 1 1/2 c. water with 1/2 c. + 1 T. powdered milk powder. Whisk together thoroughly. Add to any recipe calling for evaporated milk!

    Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

  • products

    Powdered Substitutions

    We recommend at least buying a small can of each of the “powders” and experiment with them in your regular recipes. Stock up on the ones that you like and find alternative recipes if you don’t care for them (i.e. sour cream powder may not suit you so you’ll need recipes that don’t use sour cream). Here are some powders you may want to consider buying:

    Where to Buy Baking Ingredients

    helpful
    Here are some resources both from us and all over the web that can help you if you want more depth on any areas or are looking for even more ideas of items to include in your plans. It’s always a good idea to look at multiple approaches and decide what will work best for you! And don’t forget to check out the discussions on our facebook group to catch anything we are missing or see what others are doing!

    All About Honey – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Honey: How to Use this Wonderous Natural Substance – from Are We Crazy or What
    All About Powdered Milk – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Making Evaporated and Sweetened Condensed Milk from Powdered Milk – from Food Storage and Survival
    Powdered Milk Mysteries Revealed – from Your Thrive Life
    Powdered Milk Conversion Chart – Pin from Preparedness Mama
    All About Powdered Eggs – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How to Make Powdered Eggs – from Tactical Intelligence
    All About Powdered Sour Cream – from Food Storage Made Easy
    All About Powdered Butter – from Food Storage Made Easy
    All About Yeast and Vital Wheat Gluten – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Baking with Yeast – from Roxana’s Home Baking
    How to Make Natural Yeast from Scratch – from The Bread Geek

    Please pin and get your friends joining in too!

    WEEK10PIN

    5 Reasons Beans Should be Part of Your Food Storage

    Dried beans can be an intimidating food storage item for many people. In our experience people typically either do not like them, do not know how to cook them properly, or do not know what types of foods to make using them. We want to share with you FIVE reasons why beans should be a staple in YOUR food storage (if they aren’t already) and hopefully give you some tips along the way that will help you overcome some of those common challenges.


    beans-in-food-storage

    photo credit cookbookman

    1. BEANS ARE HEALTHY

    Beans, peas, and lentils are the richest source of vegetable protein and are a good source of both soluble and insoluble dietary fiber. If you don’t have any stored meats or nuts you will definitely need to include beans in your food storage. Here are just a few reasons why beans are so healthy. You can learn more about the health benefits by reading the book Country Beans by Rita Bingham. We highly recommend it if you are storing beans at all.

    • Low Calorie Food: The amount of nutrition you get for the amount of calories is quite significant. When used as a thickener for soups or a substitution for meat beans can be very beneficial
    • Great Protein: Beans are an excellent source of protein, forming a complete protein when combined with rice, corn, and many other foods. Getting protein this way can help you avoid some of the fatty meat proteins.
    • High in Fiber: One cup of beans provide the same amount of fiber as 3 standard doses of Metamucil.
    • Low in Fat: Nearly all beans contain only 2-3% fat! You can used mashed beans as a replacement for butter or oil in many baked goods to reduce the fat content.
    • Lower Cholesterol: Not only do beans contain NO cholesterol, “they actually help the body get rid of what is considered bad cholesterol.

    2. BEANS CAN BE STORED VIRTUALLY INDEFINITELY

    When stored in a cool, dry place, beans will basically stay good forever. If you have an older supply of beans they may require more time to soak and more time to cook. We have found that using an electric pressure cooker will help your beans to turn out great every time, regardless of their age.

    Ideal conditions for long term food storage are to store your legumes sealed in mylar pouches inside of 5 gallon buckets. Using oxygen absorbers can also help maintain the freshness of the items. We also recommend keeping smaller containers in your kitchen or pantry so that you can use them in your daily cooking to practice and rotate.

    3. BEANS ARE VERSATILE

    Beans are not only good for eating as part of a Mexican dish or in soups and chilis. There are many other ways beans can be used that you may not have thought of.

    • Mash up cooked beans to replace butter/oil in recipes. Cook up dry beans and then add a little of the water used for cooking and puree them in a blender or food processor. Use cup for cup to replace the oil or butter in a recipe. Start with only replacing half the fat and gradually move up to the entire amount.
    • Grow into sprouts for a fresh “vegetable”. Legumes are a great item to sprout and can then be eaten fresh, thrown into soups, added to sandwiches, or pureed and snuck into many different foods. Older beans may have a more difficult time to sprout. Click here for a post we shared about sprouting lentils.
    • Grind white beans into bean flour  to make white sauces, homemade cream of chicken soup, or to use as a thickener for soups and stews.

    4. BEANS ARE CHEAP

    There are many varieties of beans or legumes that you can buy. You will find different uses for different types so it never hurts to just buy whatever ones are on sale. You may find dried beans in small 1 lb bags at the grocery store for $1. Pick up a bag or two every time you go to the store and you will quickly have a large supply. You can also buy them from many long term food storage companies already packed in 5 gallon buckets and ready for your storage. Some of the varieties of beans and legumes you may see are as follows:

    • Split Peas
    • Lentils
    • Lima Beans
    • Dry Soy Beans
    • Chick Peas
    • Regular Dry Beans (black, pinto, navy, red, white, etc.)

    5. BEANS ARE DELICIOUS

    One of our favorite recipes that uses beans in two different forms is a delicious Enchilada Pie. You use dried beans and also make homemade cream of chicken soup out of bean flour. Give it a try and you just might fall in love with your food storage beans!

    Food Storage Do-Over Week 9: Legumes and Meats

    We are excited to be starting week 9 of our Food Storage Do-Over 2015! If you didn’t catch last week’s post which included an index of recipe for using grains you can see it here.

    Remember this is a 17 week process that we will be going through together. If you want to join in with the group on Facebook click here. If you’d like to receive email notifications of each week’s do-over assignment you can join our mailing list here. Or you can always post in the blog comments with your progress as well! It is so much more fun and motivating doing it as a group so find a way to connect!

    WEEK9FACE

    In BabyStep 6: Legumes we discuss storing and using legumes. We also briefly touch on meats as an alternative to getting more protein into your food storage. We feel like it is very important to USE the foods you are storing so we focus on that a lot.

    startingfromscratch

    If you are brand new, we will walk you through the process of buying and starting to use your legumes this week. We will also briefly look at freeze-dried meats. Here are the tasks you will need to accomplish.

    1. Review the inventory list you worked on two weeks ago to get the total amount of legumes you need for your complete food storage plan
    2. Start purchasing legumes according to your budget – review our post on Best Ways to Purchase Traditional Food Storage for recommendations on where to buy
    3. Learn more about dry beans, lentils, split peas, and legumes.
    4. Look at our Recipes page and our Pinterest boards for ideas of recipes to try using legumes
    5. Learn more about incorporating meat into your food storage and decide how much and what types you would want to store.
    6. Purchase some canned or freeze-dried meats to start experimenting on what you prefer. You can learn to can your own or buy bulk freeze-dried meats later as you determine what will best meet your needs and price range.

    Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

    updating

    If you have some legumes and meats already stored and feel somewhat comfortable with them step outside your comfort zone and try something new:

    • Review your inventory list from two weeks week and replenish any items from the legumes section that you don’t have your full supply of.
    • Try using 2-3 legumes you never have before this week.
    • Print recipes you use often if you only have them on the computer.
    • Make sure you have 2-3 recipes that use each legume in your food storage and store all the necessary ingredients to make them.
    • Try sprouting some of your legumes to make a healthy snack
    • Try grinding some dry beans to make a bean flour useful for thickening soups or making homemade cream of chicken soup.
    • Try using some of your food storage meats as substitutions in your favorite recipes.
    • Consider purchase a bulk package of freeze-dried meats to supplement your current storage.

    Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

    products

    ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER: You will use your dried beans much more often if you have a good (and fast) way to cook them. An electric pressure cooker allows you to skip the soaking step and fully cook them in 1-2 hours (depending on the variety and age of the beans).
    ALL-AMERICAN PRESSURE CANNER: You can use a pressure canner to take dry beans and bottle them to use as regular canned beans. You can also pressure can meats as a way to preserve them for your long term food storage.
    WONDERMILL GRAIN MILL:  An electric mill will enable you to easily grind up legumes to use for bean flour.
    FREEZE-DRIED MEAT PACKAGES:  Thrive offers some amazing deals on meat packages available only through consultants. You can order directly from our unadvertised specials page.

    helpful

    Here are some resources both from us and all over the web that can help you if you want more depth on any areas or are looking for even more ideas of items to include in your plans. It’s always a good idea to look at multiple approaches and decide what will work best for you! And don’t forget to check out the discussions on our facebook group to catch anything we are missing or see what others are doing!

    PINTEREST BOARD ON BEANS/LEGUMES
    Beans the Magical Fruit (bean flour cream of chicken soup) – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How To Cook Dry Beans  – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Dehydrating Beans to Make Quick Cooks Beans – from Are We Crazy or What?
    How to Can Beans the Nourishing Way – from Traditional Cooking School
    Let’s Talk About Dried Beans – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Let’s Talk About Split Peas – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Let’s Talk About Legumes – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How to Grow Sprouts – Lentils – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Country Beans: How to cook dry beans in only 3 minutes! – by Rita Bingham
    Ways To Use Freeze-Dried Meats – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Incorporating Meat Into Your Food Storage  – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How to Pressure Can Ground Beef – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How to Pressure Can Chicken – from Food Storage Made Easy

    Please pin and get your friends joining in too!

    WEEK9PIN

    Using Grains: A Recipe Index

    GRAINSINDEX
    This week in our Food Storage Do- Over we are working on incorporating some of the grains we are storing into our everyday cooking. Here is a resource for you on recipes using grains we have done on our site over the past number of years. Pick a grain you need to use or rotate and give a recipe a try!

    WHEAT
    Blender Wheat Pancakes
    Whole Wheat/Multi-Grain Waffles
    Whole Wheat Tortillas
    Best Wheat Bread Recipe – Yup We Said BEST!
    Food Storage Enchilada Pie
    Homemade Whole Wheat Noodles and Lasagna
    Peanut Butter Bread
    3 Pizza Dough Recipes
    Pumpkin Cake
    No-Knead Bread
    Sourdough 101: Part 2 of 2 (Bread)
    Homemade Whole Wheat “Rhodes” Rolls
    Boxed Cake Mix Extender
    Best Sugar Cookies EVER!
    Whole Wheat Bread (start to finish)
    Honey Whole Wheat Bread
    Bread Making Tips
    Cookie Clay Dough
    Soft Pretzels
    Buttermilk Biscuits

    CORNEMAL
    Corn Cakes
    Buttermilk Cornbread
    Cornbread
    Cornbread II

    RICE
    Rice Flour Crepes
    Homemade Rice-a-Roni
    Swedish Beef and Rice
    Curried Lentils and Rice
    Pantry Jambalaya
    Chow Mein
    Raspberry Almond Thumbprint Cookies
    Rice Pudding

    PASTA
    Chicken Tortellini Soup
    Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup
    Homemade Macaroni and Cheese 1
    Homemade Mac ‘N’ Cheese 2
    Tuna Noodle Casserole
    Mexican Casserole
    Beach Street Lemon Chicken Linguine
    Chicken Tortellini Soup
    Tarragon Chicken Casserole
    Shelf Stable Poppyseed Chicken Recipe
    Julie’s “Healthier” Pasta Salad
    Spaghetti Salad

    OATS
    Honey Granola
    Baked Oatmeal
    Apricot Oatmeal Bars
    Homemade Granola Bars
    Honey Granola
    Apricot Oatmeal Bars
    Energy Bites

    MULTI
    Multi-Grain Pancakes
    Corndog Muffins
    Fast and Easy Chicken Quinoa Soup
    Chicken Barley Chili
    Sweet and Sour Chicken from Scratch (+ Quinoa)
    Whole Grain Banana Muffins
    Ezekiel Bread
    Cream Cheese and Jam Cookies made with HEALTHY White Flour

    Save this for later on pinterest:
    RECIPEPIN

    Food Storage Do-Over Week 8: Grains

    We are excited to be starting week 8 of our Food Storage Do-Over 2015! If you didn’t catch last week’s post on revisiting your long term supply you can see it here. Also Julie did a post on how she revisited her long term supply plan here.

    Remember this is a 17 week process that we will be going through together. If you want to join in with the group on Facebook click here. If you’d like to receive email notifications of each week’s do-over assignment you can join our mailing list here. Or you can always post in the blog comments with your progress as well! It is so much more fun and motivating doing it as a group so find a way to connect!

    WEEK8GRAINS

    In BabyStep 5: Grains we discuss storing and using grains. We feel like it is very important to USE the foods you are storing so we focus on that a lot.

    startingfromscratch

    If you are brand new, we will walk you through the process of buying and starting to use your grains this week. Here are the tasks you will need to accomplish.

    1. Review the inventory list you worked on last week to get the total amount of grains you need for your complete food storage plan
    2. Start purchasing grains according to your budget (if you don’t have a grain mill/wheat grinder you may want to purchase flours instead of whole grains for now) – review our post on Best Ways to Purchase Traditional Food Storage for recommendations on where to buy
    3. Purchase or start saving up for a wheat grinder (see our recommendations in the product section below)
    4. Learn more about wheat, oats, rice, corn/cornmeal, and barley by reading our posts on those topics
    5. Read 7 Ways to Use Wheat Without a Wheat Grinder and try some of the ideas
    6. Look at our Recipes page and our Pinterest boards for ideas of recipes to try using grains
    7. If you have (or buy) a wheat grinder, read 17 Ways to Use a Wheat Grinder and try out some of the ideas using your newly purchased grains

    Additional Things to Consider

    • The standard recommendation for storing grains is to store 300 pounds of grain per adult per year. Half that amount for children 7 and under.
    • Wheat is the most common grain to store, but you don’t have to store only wheat. The amounts on standard calculators can be swapped out pound for pound with other grains.
    • If you have wheat allergies check out the additional resources at the bottom of this post for alternatives.
    • Try making things like pancakes or pizza dough before jumping into making bread if you’re new at this
    • Consider purchasing different kinds of grains and flours and try them before you store hundreds of pounds of something you may not like or tolerate very well
    • Don’t switch to 100% whole grains overnight, do half and half at first to allow your digestive system time to adapt.

    Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

    updating

    If you have some grains already stored and feel somewhat comfortable with them step outside your comfort zone and try something new:

    • Review your inventory list from last week and replenish any items from the grains section that you don’t have your full supply of.
    • Try using 2-3 grains you never have before this week. Good places to use new grains are in pancake mixes.
    • Print recipes you use often if you only have them on the computer.
    • Make sure you have 2-3 recipes that use each grain in your food storage and store all the necessary ingredients to make them.
    • Try making sourdough with your wheat and a sourdough starter.
    • Try making bread without electricity at all. How well would you do?

    Don’t forget to come over and share your progress in our Food Storage Do-Over Facebook Group!

    products

    WONDERMILL GRAIN MILL:  An electric mill is an important tool for rotating and practicing using all of your grains, not just wheat.
    WONDER JUNIOR DELUXE:  A manual wheat grinder is useful for powerless emergencies and also to grind oily items like nuts and seeds.
    BOSCH MIXERS:  If you are planning to get into bread baking with your wheat, a Bosch mixer will be a great tool to add to your kitchen.

    helpful
    Wheat / Wheat Grinders
    Let’s Talk About Wheat – from Food Storage Made Easy
    7 Ways to Use Wheat Without a Wheat Grinder – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Wheat Grinder Overview (Pros and Cons) – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Wheat Grinder Video – from Food Storage Made Easy

    Breads / Cooking with Wheat
    BREADS PINTEREST BOARD
    Grinding Flour + 6 Fresh Flour Baking Tips – from Melissa K Norris
    Top 5 Reasons to Grind Your Own Wheat – from The Bread Geek
    BEST Wheat Bread Recipe – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Top 12 Questions About Baking Bread – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Bread – No grinding, no kneading, no electricity … no problem – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Sourdough 101 – from Food Storage Made Easy
    17 Ways to Use a Wheat Grinder – from Food Storage Made Easy

    Other Grains / Wheat Alternatives
    GRAINS PINTEREST BOARD
    Grains Overview Page – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How to Soak Grains and Why We Should – from Whole New Mom
    Alternatives to Wheat – from The Survival Mom
    Sources for Alternative Grains – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Let’s Talk About Oats – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Quinoa in Food Storage – from Preparedness Mama
    50 Quinoa Recipes – from Your Thrive Life
    Let’s Talk About Rice – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Why I Prefer Kamut (ancient grain) – from Mom Prepares
    Let’s Talk About Cornmeal – from Food Storage Made Easy
    Let’s Talk About Barley – from Food Storage Made Easy
    How to Cook Rice Without a Rice Cooker – from Food Storage Made Easy

    Please pin and get your friends joining in too!

    WEEK8PIN

    Julie’s Long Term Food Storage Planning Check Up

    In case you haven’t been following along, this year Jodi and I have decided to do a complete Food Storage Do-Over and go step-by-step re-evaluating our entire food storage plan. We are working on one topic each week and this week is our long term food storage planning week. When we started our food storage journey, I had one little guy who was 18 months. Now I’m about to have my fourth son and I can certainly tell you my family eats more NOW than they did 6 years ago. It was nice to have a chance to really take a look at my plan again and make sure it’s meeting my current needs.

    When you are making your long term food storage plan, PLAN on it changing.

    So here is what I did now that we have another boy on the way. Making the plan for what I still need is where I always start. Today I’m going to share with you how I determined what I still need to buy in my basic long term food storage.


    longterm-fb

    1. First I re-downloaded our food storage calculator. This calculator contains the standard “food storage” foods that typically have long shelf lives. It’s basic life sustaining foods. My goal is to store a year supply of these foods and supplement with fruits, vegetables, meats, and cheeses. This actually gives me longer than a year supply, but I also have boys who eat more than regular boys so I figure it evens it out. So this is what it looks like when I say 2 adults and 4 kids.

    Capture

    2. Second I altered the calculator right in the spreadsheet to work with my family’s needs. For example:

    • I added in quinoa and take out a lot of cornmeal. With grains you can exchange pound for pound. I mess around with the pounds of grains until it’s a make up that suits more of what my family eats. You can do this percentage wise if you don’t know it pound wise.
    • I replaced some of the vegetable oil requirements with coconut oil and olive oil since that is what we eat more often.
    • I also replaced some of the sugar with honey and pure maple syrup. I know those items are more expensive but again, we don’t eat much white sugar so I feel like it’s wasteful to store and I don’t rotate it.
    • I increased the amount of powdered eggs I store because I know I use them a lot in pancakes in daily life, let alone an emergency, and it’s simply not enough.
    • I did a few other minor changes taking out/replacing foods we don’t eat.

    3. Next I printed my spreadsheet and brought it with me to the food storage room. I inventoried what I had with a pencil right on the paper. Since I have a lot of my food storage already I didn’t worry about the cost and cost per units for now because I’ll only look into it on the items I need to buy when I need to buy them.

    4. With my printed paper I updated the spreadsheet and watched all the numbers fill in for what I still needed to buy. It was as “easy” as that!

    This has gotten easier and easier each time. Over the past 6 years our diets have changed but we are in a pretty consistent phase right now. We eat from our food storage foods and rotate fairly easy. If anything this do-over week has taught me investing the time into learning about food storage foods and getting comfortable using them has been well worth it.