Food Storage Recipes

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Give some of our tested, tried, and true recipes a try as you work on learning to use and rotate your Food Storage.

BREAKFAST

Corn Cakes
Multi-Grain Pancakes
Blender Wheat Pancakes
Whole Wheat/Multi-Grain Waffles
Honey Granola
Fruit Smoothies
Baked Oatmeal
How to Make Omelets Freeze-Dried Style
Rice Flour Crepes
Morning Glory Muffins

LUNCH

Bean Flour Cream of Chicken Soup
Pasta Salad with Freeze Dried Chicken
Chicken Tortellini Soup
Bean Flour Cream of Chicken Soup
Twelve Bean Soup
Split Pea Soup
Roasted Tomato Soup
Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup
Homemade Rice-a-Roni
Homemade Macaroni and Cheese
Corndog Muffins
Whole Wheat Tortillas
Garden Chicken Stew
Homemade Mac ‘N’ Cheese
Chili With Chocolate
Summer Salad with a Quick and Easy Corn Salsa
Greek Lentil Soup Recipe
Fast and Easy Chicken Quinoa Soup
Chicken Tortilla Soup
16 Bean Soup
Salsa, Chicken, and Black Bean Soup Recipe
Creamy Potato Soup(Food Storage and Fat-Free Style)

DINNER

Swedish Beef and Rice
Curried Lentils and Rice
Pantry Jambalaya
Tuna Noodle Casserole
Chicken Parmesan
Beef Stew
Food Storage Enchilada Pie
Catalina Chicken
Ultimate Meat Loaf
Mexican Casserole
Homemade Whole Wheat Noodles and Lasagna
Beach Street Lemon Chicken Linguine
Chow Mein
Chicken Barley Chili
Twelve Bean Soup
Real Chili Beans
Chicken Tortellini Soup
Apricot Oatmeal Bars
Garden Chicken Stew
Tarragon Chicken Casserole
Meatballs Tetrazzini Recipe
Pizza Casserole (Food Storage Style)
Baked Sweet and Sour Chicken
Sweet and Sour Chicken from Scratch (+ Quinoa)
Shelf Stable Poppyseed Chicken Recipe
3 Pizza Dough Recipes
Sweet and Sour Meatballs and Zucchini

DESSERT

Shelf Stable Jello
Dutch Oven Bisquick Cobbler
Pineapple Angel Food Cake
Chocolate Cake
Pumpkin Cake
Cookie Clay Dough
wheat Applesauce Cake
Best Krispie Squares
Pudding Pie
Rice Pudding
Lemon Bars
Worms and Dirt
Super Cherry Pie
Fondant Icing
Apricot Oatmeal Bars
Peanut Butter Dog Treats
Strawberry Macaroons
Boxed Cake Mix Extender
Raspberry Almond Thumbprint Cookies
Best Sugar Cookies EVER!
Energy Bites
Food Storage Blackberry Pie
Cream Cheese and Jam Cookies made with HEALTHY White Flour
How to Make an Ice Cream Cake
Rhubarb Crumb Coffee Cake Recipe
Food Storage Carrot Cake

SNACKS

Brazilian Black Beans
How to Make Basic Black Beans
Soft Pretzels
Homemade Granola Bars
Honey Granola
Buttermilk Cornbread
Cornbread
Buttermilk Biscuits
Homemade Rice-a-Roni
Spaghetti Salad
Texas Caviar aka Black Bean Salsa
Hummus
Enchilada Sauce
Fresh Garden Salsa
Homemade Ranch Dip or Dressing
Thanksgiving Green Bean Casserole
Easy Homemade Strawberry Syrup and Jam!
Ritzy (or Funeral) Potatoes
Julie’s “Healthier” Pasta Salad
Homemade Fruit Leather (fruit roll-ups)
Cilantro-Lime Rice

BREADS

Best Wheat Bread Recipe – Yup We Said BEST!
Cornbread II
Whole Wheat Bread (start to finish)
Honey Whole Wheat Bread
Ezekiel Bread
Bread Making Tips
whole Wheat Tortillas
Buttermilk Cornbread
Cornbread
Buttermilk Biscuits
Peanut Butter Bread
Sourdough 101: Part 2 of 2 (Bread)
Sourdough Sandwich Bread
Homemade Whole Wheat “Rhodes” Rolls
Whole Grain Banana Muffins
BREAD: No Grinding, No Kneading, No Electricity … NO PROBLEM!
Ezekiel Bread: Updated recipe with video

SAVE FOR LATER – PIN ON PINTEREST

Food Storage Recipes from the girls at Food Storage Made Easy

  • Rita

    Can you store chocolate candy in mylar pouches? And would you use an oxygen packet? I’m thinking pouches would be safer than using a #10 can because of the moisture that would be in the candy.

    • I’ve had good experience with vacuum sealing chocolates so I would assume mylar bag and oxygen absorber would work just as well. Good luck!

    • Rita

      Thanks so much for your quick response!!

  • Mrspicklehonker

    I have been trying to download the shelf stable cookbook and it won’t let me.  I just get a blank page and told that there was an error.  Is there any way that I can get the cookbook emailed to me?  Thanks for any help you can give .

  • Miedhontmills

    We ran out of ink when I wanted to print these recepies,4 per page, where are they?

  • Just found your site!  I was thinking of making my own blog on this topic, but now I don’t have to because you have everything I was thinking of having already. 

    I have many recipes already converted and could also explain how to convert recipes.  Is there a place on the site where I can post recipes and other information?

  • I like you searching method! Easy to identify, I’m going to send this site to my lovely cooker friend. And it’s fun reading all the comments here. Thanks!

  • quiltinmom

    Do you have a page or chart that explains how to covert a regular recipe into a food storage recipe? Such as, how to substitute dry milk for regular milk, powdered eggs for fresh eggs, etc. Thanks!

  • Grneyedshewolf1

    do you have any recipes that you can use when you have dehydrated foods that you want to mix together to have ready made meals so that all you need to do is add water and cook?

    • We haven’t posted those specifically, but you could try a few books for
      ideas such as Mix-a-Meal, Dinners in a Jar, Food Storage in a Bag, etc.

  • Pat

    Does anyone have a recipe for Ezekiel bread?
    Also, when a recipe calls for a packet of yeats how much does that mean in teaspoons?

  • Basounia

    this is not was i was searching for

  • Pat

    I’m looking for a recipe for canning bacon. I read one not too long ago but can not for the life of me remember where…..rough to get old. If anyone has such a recipe sure would appreciate it.
    Thanks.

    • I think someone had mentioned it on our facebook fan page. You can try posting the question again and maybe someone can help you out. http://facebook.com/foodstoragemadeeasy

    • Mojotango

      I did find a bacon receipe online via another PREP site page! Sorry I no longer have the link! I printed out the recipe for myself to put in my canning books. I think I found it by google though!

  • Vicky Despain

    Whoops! 1/2 cup tapioca starch, 1/2 cup rice flour and 1 tbsp of potato starch for 1 cup of flour.

  • Vicky Despain

    Cooking gluten free from scratch is the way to go if you have a gluten intolerance. In most cookie, desserts, etc. substitute 1/2 cup tapioca starch, 1/2 cup rice flour and 2 tbsp of potato starch for 1 cup of flour in a recipe. I also have a great bread recipe!

  • Vicky Despain

    Cooking gluten free from scratch is the way to go if you have a gluten intolerance. In most cookie, desserts, etc. substitute 1/2 cup tapioca starch, 1/2 cup rice flour and 2 tbsp of potato starch for 1 cup of flour in a recipe. I also have a great bread recipe!

  • Vicky Despain

    Cooking gluten free from scratch is the way to go if you have a gluten intolerance. In most cookie, desserts, etc. substitute 1/2 cup tapioca starch, 1/2 cup rice flour and 2 tbsp of potato starch for 1 cup of flour in a recipe. I also have a great bread recipe!

  • Vicky Despain

    Cooking gluten free from scratch is the way to go if you have a gluten intolerance. In most cookie, desserts, etc. substitute 1/2 cup tapioca starch, 1/2 cup rice flour and 2 tbsp of potato starch for 1 cup of flour in a recipe. I also have a great bread recipe!

  • I love your site.

  • Anonymous

    Looking for recipes for different types of sprouts.

  • Anonymous

    Looking for different recipes for different types of sprouts.

  • Debi Winthers

    Will be checking out your web site a ton more at home where I can read, learn and focus on all that is here. I look forward to spending more time with you…

  • Beverly lytton

    I love your site. I have learned a lot about food storage. Thanks. Will be back.

  • Diana

    A quick way to make cottage cheese is to mix up a pitcher of dry milk, twice the strength. Add lemon juice or vinegar and stir slowly until too clumpy to stir. Remove curd from pitcher with slotted spoon. Add more vinegar or lemon juice, repeat. If no curds form, add more milk powder, stir. Repeat until you have enough. It can be used as is or add salt to taste. It is tasty and it sure beats running to the store at rush hour. Arm power vs time, car, gas, cash and long lines. Good things!

  • Diana

    I added a can of drained and mashed Great Northern beans to a Funfetti cake mix, added an egg and baked as cookies. YUMMY! No sugar lows due to the beans. =)

  • Diana

    Have you tried baking bread in the crock pot? I haven’t located a recipe for it, but in my search found a couple cake recipes on the Betty Crocker site. Seems like sour dough would be he bread to try since you add water to the oven to get crunchy crust. Any experience there?

  • Rachael

    I drink soy milk because I am lactose intolerant. Where would I find a recipe to make it???

  • Crystal_cajun_coon

    Tami83,
    Auguson Farms has some excellent gluten free products and mixes that can be used….
    As for lacotose intolerance you may wnat to look into soy, almond and rice milk which can be purchaed or made at home very easily.

    • Crystal_cajun_coon

      Sorry I left out it comes up on google under BlueChip group Auguson Farms: http://augasonfarms.com/
      My mom has severe celiacs and loves these mixes….

    • Rachael

      I drink soy milk because I am lactose intolerant. Where would I find a recipe to make it???

  • Crystal_cajun_coon

    Tami83,
    Auguson Farms has some excellent gluten free products and mixes that can be used….
    As for lacotose intolerance you may wnat to look into soy, almond and rice milk which can be purchaed or made at home very easily.

  • Sheila

    Where do I find the churches cookbook? Sheila

  • ErinT.

    Powdered eggs was the very first long-term food storage item I bought a year ago. I used them in absolutely everything, just as I would regular eggs (I didn't like them so well in recipes that were mostly egg, like hootenanny pancakes, but in everything else, they were great!)

  • I'm interested in detaails about your pressure cooker canner. What is the brand, where did you find it and is it expensive? I have looked everywhere for one. I had decided that they don't make the big ones anymore. It sounds good too that you don't have to worry about the rubber gasket. I hope you don't mind me asking. Thanks, Dora

  • Tami, While we haven't addressed this specifically yet, we do have plans to explore this topic more in the future. Also, a lot of people on our facebook fan page seem to have some good tips for allergy things. It's worth poking around on there and/or posting a question about it and see what pops up.

  • Tami83

    I've been surfing your site. I've found some great stuff. But…My daughter and myself are both gluten and dairy intolerant do you have suggestions for me as I built my food storage to accommdate our issues. I've found most receipes include wheat and dairy and that is going to be a big problem as we build our storage. I find that we eat a lot of meat due to our issues. More bean (black & navy) or rice reciepes would help me.

  • Anonymous

    I’ve been surfing your site. I’ve found some great stuff. But…My daughter and myself are both gluten and dairy intolerant do you have suggestions for me as I built my food storage to accommdate our issues. I’ve found most receipes include wheat and dairy and that is going to be a big problem as we build our storage. I find that we eat a lot of meat due to our issues. More bean (black & navy) or rice reciepes would help me.

    • Tami, While we haven’t addressed this specifically yet, we do have plans to explore this topic more in the future. Also, a lot of people on our facebook fan page seem to have some good tips for allergy things. It’s worth poking around on there and/or posting a question about it and see what pops up.

    • Lisa in TX

      Sue Gregg has several wonderful bean recipies as well as allergy substitution suggestions in her books. Her website is http://www.suegregg.com. I am not a paid sponsor by the way, just a fan. 😉

  • beverlygrob

    the big T means tablespoon. I would recommend getting a set of spoons from over here, as they are exact measurements and not the ones one uses as a soup spoon. I lived in Switzerland for a number of years, and so I completely understand the confusion!

  • beverlygrob

    the big T means tablespoon. I would recommend getting a set of spoons from over here, as they are exact measurements and not the ones one uses as a soup spoon. I lived in Switzerland for a number of years, and so I completely understand the confusion!

  • juststarting

    I can deer meat and beef. just cut all the fat off cut into stew size pieces and pack into jars. don't add water. i add a little salt half tsp for pints and tsp for quarts. the process time is in the ball blue book for different size jars and it tells you what pound of pressure to use.

  • Kathee

    Learning to use a Pressure Canner makes me feel a lot more prepared. Canned chicken uses: chicken salad, soup, burritos, BBQ sandwiches, enchiladas, add to rice or pasta – absolutely anything! When bottling add a couple lemon slices to chicken, or some teriaki sauce, or liquid smoke – be creative! I like buying chicken tenders on sale – smaller size. When bottling: Shredded chicken = packed full. Cubes or chunky chicken or more broth = pack less tight in bottles.
    I pre-cook my ground meat (we use ground turkey), add onion, garlic, sometimes taco seasoning, sometimes tomato. I also bottle soup starter: chunks of potatoes, carrots, onions, spices, cooked ground meat, 1/2 cup raw barley, process for no more than 90 minutes. Bottle raw hard beans: 1 rounded cup washed raw beans, add sea salt, dried onion, fill with water and process for 90 minutes. White raw beans with some ham chunks!!! Raw pinto beans with chili seasoning and ground meat. My husband got me a huge canner with no rubber gasket to wear out. It holds 14 quarts or 3 layers of pints. Best addition to years supply. I recently purchased an ELECTRIC Cuisinart pressure cooker at Costco for $65.00. It also cooks raw beans with no pre-soaking. I set it outside in the summer to keep heat out of kitchen.

  • So far, I am very impressed with your site. Thank you for sharing all of your knowledge and research and dedication to sharing this with us. Thanks!

  • So far, I am very impressed with your site. Thank you for sharing all of your knowledge and research and dedication to sharing this with us. Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    i have tons of powered eggs and powdered milk i need recipes for. does anyone have recipes that doesn’t call for whole wheat flour?

    • ErinT.

      Powdered eggs was the very first long-term food storage item I bought a year ago. I used them in absolutely everything, just as I would regular eggs (I didn’t like them so well in recipes that were mostly egg, like hootenanny pancakes, but in everything else, they were great!)

  • dianaallen

    i have tons of powered eggs and powdered milk i need recipes for. does anyone have recipes that doesn't call for whole wheat flour?

  • Anonymous

    Can you send some Vegetarian recipes? We are vegetarians and dont eat meat or any sea food stuff. But we do eat egg. So if you can add some Vegetarian recipes that would be great too. Thanks.

  • avidity_2002

    Can you send some Vegetarian recipes? We are vegetarians and dont eat meat or any sea food stuff. But we do eat egg. So if you can add some Vegetarian recipes that would be great too. Thanks.

  • A capital T is tablespoon. tsp. is teaspoon.

  • Katelyn

    I love your website, I am from Europe and we have different measurements overhere, so I am wondering when you use the T in a recipe, do you mean a tablespoon or a teaspoon? Thanks,

    • A capital T is tablespoon. tsp. is teaspoon.

    • Anonymous

      the big T means tablespoon. I would recommend getting a set of spoons from over here, as they are exact measurements and not the ones one uses as a soup spoon. I lived in Switzerland for a number of years, and so I completely understand the confusion!

  • Katelyn

    I love your website, I am from Europe and we have different measurements overhere, so I am wondering when you use the T in a recipe, do you mean a tablespoon or a teaspoon? Thanks,

  • Anonymous

    I signed up for your checklists, and have been following them for a while. I would like to share a recipe with you for an Ezekiel Bread that I use. It uses a mixture of grains and lengumes, which helps to utilize some of the others that I have stored, and it tastes great. They say you could live off this bread by only supplementing with vitamin C. All of the flour’s are ground in your flour mill.

    2 3/4 c. whole wheat flour
    1/4 c. millet flour
    1/4 c. lintels flour
    1 3/4 c. rye flour
    1/2 c. barley flour
    2 T. kidney beans flour
    2 T. northern beans flour
    2 T. black beans flour
    2 t. sea salt

    2 T. yeast
    1/4 c. warm water
    2 T. honey

    1/4 to 1/2 c. honey (depending on how sweet you like your bread)
    1/4 c. canola oil
    1 c. warm milk (made from powdered milk)

    Mix the dry ingredients and divide into two portions. Put one portion in the refridgerator for later use. Dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup warm water and 2 T. honey. Meanwhile add the 1/4-1/2 c. honey, oil and warm milk to the dry ingredients. Add yeast mixture and stir just till dampened. Dough will be of that consistency of muffin batter. (If adding more honey, you may have to cut back the milk a little or add a little more wheat flour). Pour this mixture into a greased loaf pan and let rise for 1 hour. Bake at 375 degrees for 25-45 minutes. The bread is done when it pulls away from the side of the pan.

    • Jeanne

      Can you subsitute the whole wheat flour if allergy?
      Jeanne

  • kellywoodruff

    I signed up for your checklists, and have been following them for a while. I would like to share a recipe with you for an Ezekiel Bread that I use. It uses a mixture of grains and lengumes, which helps to utilize some of the others that I have stored, and it tastes great. They say you could live off this bread by only supplementing with vitamin C. All of the flour's are ground in your flour mill.

    2 3/4 c. whole wheat flour
    1/4 c. millet flour
    1/4 c. lintels flour
    1 3/4 c. rye flour
    1/2 c. barley flour
    2 T. kidney beans flour
    2 T. northern beans flour
    2 T. black beans flour
    2 t. sea salt

    2 T. yeast
    1/4 c. warm water
    2 T. honey

    1/4 to 1/2 c. honey (depending on how sweet you like your bread)
    1/4 c. canola oil
    1 c. warm milk (made from powdered milk)

    Mix the dry ingredients and divide into two portions. Put one portion in the refridgerator for later use. Dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup warm water and 2 T. honey. Meanwhile add the 1/4-1/2 c. honey, oil and warm milk to the dry ingredients. Add yeast mixture and stir just till dampened. Dough will be of that consistency of muffin batter. (If adding more honey, you may have to cut back the milk a little or add a little more wheat flour). Pour this mixture into a greased loaf pan and let rise for 1 hour. Bake at 375 degrees for 25-45 minutes. The bread is done when it pulls away from the side of the pan.

  • Anonymous

    My Aunt Margie helped me can meat one year, but for the life of me I can’t remember how. It was great though, when we had company I could have dinner for the whole crew in less than 15 minutes. I just used to dump the meat, liquid and all in a pot, thicken it with flour and that would be meat and gravey over mashed potatoes and a veggie. I had no way of knowing any other way to use it, but no one complained about it.
    My canned chicken, made great chicken and bisquits, chicken pot pies and chicken salad sandwiches.
    Nikki, it would be sweet of you to share how to can meats, although I’m sure I can find out on my own.

    • Anonymous

      Liz, canning meat is a breeze! 🙂 And right now you can get great prices! For chicken breasts… all I do is fill the jar with the raw meat (no broth, no salt, no fillers, no nuthin’). Process for 1 hour 15 minutes at 10 pounds pressure. You’ll see that the chicken will make it’s own broth. Same goes for cuts of beef. Go ahead and buy the cheap stuff… it will be tender as anything when you open your bottle! 🙂 I de-bone all of my meat and trim the fat. If you want to do ground beef I suggest browning it first. I did add a tomato sauce to my ground beef because all of my recipes call for some sort of tomato base and that was one less can I had to worry about. 🙂 I hope this helps but if you have any questions let me know. I’m happy to help. 🙂 ~ Nikki (I don’t know why I have two different identities on here LOL 🙂

      • Liz76522

        All these great responses, your’s answered my basic questions the best.
        Oh, I found a pressure canner (ancient) but all appeared well except the rubber parts. Went to Presto web site bought all of the items that I could and voila! I have a pressure canner.
        Canned beans, yeah, yeah, simple but I hate spending hours and hours cooking those doggone things. So we have plenty of kidney beans for the month (over guestimated how much I would need).
        Tomorrow my granddaughter and I are going to do the black-eyed peas, and a few cans of chick peas for me!!!!!
        Thank you everybody!

    • Kathee

      Learning to use a Pressure Canner makes me feel a lot more prepared. Canned chicken uses: chicken salad, soup, burritos, BBQ sandwiches, enchiladas, add to rice or pasta – absolutely anything! When bottling add a couple lemon slices to chicken, or some teriaki sauce, or liquid smoke – be creative! I like buying chicken tenders on sale – smaller size. When bottling: Shredded chicken = packed full. Cubes or chunky chicken or more broth = pack less tight in bottles.
      I pre-cook my ground meat (we use ground turkey), add onion, garlic, sometimes taco seasoning, sometimes tomato. I also bottle soup starter: chunks of potatoes, carrots, onions, spices, cooked ground meat, 1/2 cup raw barley, process for no more than 90 minutes. Bottle raw hard beans: 1 rounded cup washed raw beans, add sea salt, dried onion, fill with water and process for 90 minutes. White raw beans with some ham chunks!!! Raw pinto beans with chili seasoning and ground meat. My husband got me a huge canner with no rubber gasket to wear out. It holds 14 quarts or 3 layers of pints. Best addition to years supply. I recently purchased an ELECTRIC Cuisinart pressure cooker at Costco for $65.00. It also cooks raw beans with no pre-soaking. I set it outside in the summer to keep heat out of kitchen.

      • I’m interested in detaails about your pressure cooker canner. What is the brand, where did you find it and is it expensive? I have looked everywhere for one. I had decided that they don’t make the big ones anymore. It sounds good too that you don’t have to worry about the rubber gasket. I hope you don’t mind me asking. Thanks, Dora

    • Anonymous

      I can deer meat and beef. just cut all the fat off cut into stew size pieces and pack into jars. don’t add water. i add a little salt half tsp for pints and tsp for quarts. the process time is in the ball blue book for different size jars and it tells you what pound of pressure to use.

  • Nicoyar

    Liz, canning meat is a breeze! 🙂 And right now you can get great prices! For chicken breasts… all I do is fill the jar with the raw meat (no broth, no salt, no fillers, no nuthin'). Process for 1 hour 15 minutes at 10 pounds pressure. You'll see that the chicken will make it's own broth. Same goes for cuts of beef. Go ahead and buy the cheap stuff… it will be tender as anything when you open your bottle! 🙂 I de-bone all of my meat and trim the fat. If you want to do ground beef I suggest browning it first. I did add a tomato sauce to my ground beef because all of my recipes call for some sort of tomato base and that was one less can I had to worry about. 🙂 I hope this helps but if you have any questions let me know. I'm happy to help. 🙂

  • liz76522

    My Aunt Margie helped me can meat one year, but for the life of me I can't remember how. It was great though, when we had company I could have dinner for the whole crew in less than 15 minutes. I just used to dump the meat, liquid and all in a pot, thicken it with flour and that would be meat and gravey over mashed potatoes and a veggie. I had no way of knowing any other way to use it, but no one complained about it.
    My canned chicken, made great chicken and bisquits, chicken pot pies and chicken salad sandwiches.
    Nikki, it would be sweet of you to share how to can meats, although I'm sure I can find out on my own.

  • Nikki

    I’d love to see more recipes using canned meats. It’s so easy to can them (easier than fruits and veggies in my opinion). I have a whole pantry stocked up with meats and need more ideas to fill my menus. 🙂 Thanks for all you do. I love your site!!

  • Nikki

    I'd love to see more recipes using canned meats. It's so easy to can them (easier than fruits and veggies in my opinion). I have a whole pantry stocked up with meats and need more ideas to fill my menus. 🙂 Thanks for all you do. I love your site!!

  • Sean

    A good recipe using split peas is Alton Brown’s Split Pea Burgers http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/split-pea-burgers-recipe/index.html They are delicious. We fed them to a friend’s 6 and 3 year old and told them they were just burgers. They scarfed them down.

  • Sean

    A good recipe using split peas is Alton Brown's Split Pea Burgers http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/… They are delicious. We fed them to a friend's 6 and 3 year old and told them they were just burgers. They scarfed them down.

  • Carolyn

    Sprouts: When I have sprouts in the house our family enjoys them in egg foo yong. This is not exactly a recipie, quantities of each ingredient are forgiving and dependent on individual taste. I have never tried powdered eggs, and they would probably work.

    2 eggs per person, beaten in a mixing bowl
    1 oz. milk per person (any form as liquid)
    1/3 cup sprouts and/or peas per person
    salt/peper/soy sauce to taste
    1 tsp. butter or margarin

    Add the milk, salt, peper, soy sauce to the eggs and beat. Put the butter in a frying pan and melt on medium heat. Pour in the egg mixture and stir the sprouts/peas into the top.

    Turn to finish (about the same as an easy over egg)

  • Carolyn

    Sprouts: When I have sprouts in the house our family enjoys them in egg foo yong. This is not exactly a recipie, quantities of each ingredient are forgiving and dependent on individual taste. I have never tried powdered eggs, and they would probably work.

    2 eggs per person, beaten in a mixing bowl
    1 oz. milk per person (any form as liquid)
    1/3 cup sprouts and/or peas per person
    salt/peper/soy sauce to taste
    1 tsp. butter or margarin

    Add the milk, salt, peper, soy sauce to the eggs and beat. Put the butter in a frying pan and melt on medium heat. Pour in the egg mixture and stir the sprouts/peas into the top.

    Turn to finish (about the same as an easy over egg)

  • I just made the peanut butter criss cross cookies in the churches cook book. I used white bean puree in stead of shortening and I used whole wheat flour instead of regular flour. They are a little more crisp but really good.

  • Michelle

    I just made the peanut butter criss cross cookies in the churches cook book. I used white bean puree in stead of shortening and I used whole wheat flour instead of regular flour. They are a little more crisp but really good.

    • Sheila

      Where do I find the churches cookbook? Sheila

  • mom2hrz

    I will 2nd the hillbillyhousewife site. I have also used a bunch of her recipes and my family has loved them. We especially love making our own rice mixes. Tons cheaper than buying them in the store–and all from using home food storage! Check it out!

  • mom2hrz

    I will 2nd the hillbillyhousewife site. I have also used a bunch of her recipes and my family has loved them. We especially love making our own rice mixes. Tons cheaper than buying them in the store–and all from using home food storage! Check it out!

  • J.S.R.

    I have been using some of the lentil, rice and other recipes from this site. http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com. It’s been fun learning to use this staples that typically are not in traditional cook books. Hope this resource helps.

  • J.S.R.

    I have been using some of the lentil, rice and other recipes from this site. http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com. It’s been fun learning to use this staples that typically are not in traditional cook books. Hope this resource helps.

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