Food Storage Recipe: Pea Soup

If any of you have ever lived in one state, or country, then moved to another where your favorite restaurants, or foods were no longer you’ll understand this post… (For example: anyone leave Utah and miss Cafe Rio?)

Growing up as a kid in Canada I always ate “Habitant Pea Soup”. It was warm and delicious on a cold winters day. When I moved to the States I could never find my favorite soup and lived for 10 years without it! While in a class about legumes I stumbled upon Rita Bingham’s Country Beans book and found this recipe.

peasoup

ate

It tasted just like my favorite childhood soup, was EASY, and or course, used food storage. Here’s the recipe:

Pea Soup:

Ingredients:
2½ T of dried peas (green or yellow) ground to make 3 T pea flour
1 ½ c. cold water
2 t chicken bouillon

Directions:
Mix ½ c cold water and 3 T pea flour in a bowl, set aside. Bring 1 cup and 2 t of chicken bouillon to a boil. Add in pea mixture. Bring back to a boil. Soup will thicken. You can add shredded carrots, veggies, or onion powder.


  • Vivian Johnson

    If you like split peas, I have a soup recipe to share with you.

    Split Pea

    Makes: 8-10 servings

    Ham bone (leave some
    meat on it, don’t use bare bone, remove most of the fat)
    10 c water (you may need to add more if it cooks away)
    Chop finely:
    1 white onion
    ½ a head of celery
    (use the inner stems with their leaves) chop finely
    2 carrots, grated or
    shredded (optional)
    1 tsp. thyme leaves
    1 tsp. black pepper with Worcestershire
    1 tsp. basil
    1 tsp. ginger
    1 T. garlic puree or granulated garlic
    5 chicken bouillon cubes

    Boil together for ten minutes, then lower temperature to
    simmer for an hour.
    If you can refrigerate, it helps skim fat off soup in the
    morning, or after several hours of cooling.
    Remove the bones from the meat; throw bones out, unless you
    know of another use for them. Throw out extra fat whenever possible. Break meat into small pieces before returning
    to soup.

    Sort and rinse,
    1 lb. of split peas, either green or yellow.
    or ½ and ½ split peas and lentils—if you use a pound of each
    you’ll want to increase the stock.

    Add to soup stock.
    When peas are completely soft and ready to eat, check for
    saltiness. If necessary, add salt to taste.

    If too salty or too thin, add up to 1 c. instant potato
    (dry, right from the container) Add a little extra cook time—5 min or so.

  • Zimmermanfarm

    How many serving does this recipe make?

    • Suz

      Just by looking at the recipe, I’d say one bowl. If you wanted to make enough for a whole pot, it would take a lot of bouillon, but you could always substitute the water with chicken broth.

      So, if you made around 3 quarts of soup, it would be 2 cups of pea flour and 12 cups of broth. (Or you could use water and broth if your broth is concentrated) If you want veggies, I suggest cooking them in the broth and then adding the pea flour.

      • Suz

        Or, if 3 quarts is too much:

        2/3 C. pea flour to one quart broth or
        1 1/3 C. pea flower to 2 quarts broth.

        And so on and so forth. Use 2/3 C flour for every quart of soup you want.

  • I can relate. My husband works out of state, so when we travel with him, the food is all different in stores and in restaurants. We lived in Georgia for 18 months and now we are back north. I miss Publix!! http://thepreparedhousehold.blogspot.com/

  • I can relate. My husband works out of state, so when we travel with him, the food is all different in stores and in restaurants. We lived in Georgia for 18 months and now we are back north. I miss Publix!! http://thepreparedhousehold.blogspot.com/