Ezekiel Bread – Julie’s Long Overdue Promise

So awhile back one of our Facebook Fans asked if someone would try this bread for her because she didn’t have a wheat grinder. I promised I would – And I’m not going to admit how long it took me to get around to it… (although you could find the thread on our facebook discussions and I would be busted!)

So I really had no idea why so many people fussed about this bread, I was just excited to try something new… I looked it up and found this:

HISTORY

Ezekiel bread in it’s earliest form can be found in the Holy Bible in the book of Ezekiel chapter 4, verse 9 which says: “Also take wheat, barley, beans, lentils, millet, and spelt, and put them into one vessel and make bread of them.” (Amplified Bible) In this verse the prophet Ezekiel is told by God to make bread in a certain way and then he lives on water and this bread for 390 days while he resides in the desert.

Ezekiel bread is a bread made from four grains and four beans. Typically it contains wheat, spelt or rye, barley, millet, lentils, great northern beans, kidney beans, and pinto beans ground in a grain mill. The specific mixture of grains and beans has been tested by food scientists and found to be complete nutritionally.

ADVENUTRE
ezekiel_01

Combined the wet ingredients and got all my grains out. I bought the ones I didn’t already have at the bulk section of a store called Winco here in Utah. I think most health food stores, or stores that sell grains in bulk should have all the ingredients.

ezekiel_02

Layered the grains in legumes in this clear measuring cup (for no reason other then to take a cute picture…) Isn’t it decorative and beautiful?

ezekiel_03

Threw all the grains and legumes into my WonderMill wheat grinder that I LOVE and ….

ezekiel_04

Out came a beautiful flour. I mixed the flour with the wet stuff and kept mixing. The consistency is more like a batter then a doughy bread-

ezekiel_05

Let the loaves rise, then I baked them and tested it by taking a glob of bread out of the middle…

ezekiel_06
ezek

Ingredients
• 2 1/2 cups wheat berries
• 1 1/2 cups spelt flour
• 1/2 cup barley
• 1/2 cup millet
• 1/4 cup dry green lentils
• 2 tablespoons dry great Northern beans
• 2 tablespoons dry kidney beans
• 2 tablespoons dried pinto beans
• 4 cups warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
• 1 cup honey
• 1/2 cup olive oil
• 2 (.25 ounce) packages active dry yeast
• 2 teaspoons salt

Directions
1. Measure the water, honey, olive oil, and yeast into a large bowl. Let sit for 3 to 5 minutes.
2. Stir all of the grains and beans together until well mixed. Grind in a grain mill. Add fresh milled flour and salt to the yeast mixture; stir until well mixed, about 10 minutes. The dough will be like that of a batter bread. Pour dough into three greased 9 x 5 inch loaf pans.
3. Let rise in a warm place for about 1 hour, or until dough has reached top of the pan.
4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 45 to 50 minutes, or until loaves are golden brown.

love

What FASCINATED me so much about this bread was how good for you it is- AND IT STILL TASTES GOOD!

I’m slowly learning more and more about nutrition and this I do know from one of my favorite books by Rita Bingham – if you combine a legume with a whole grain it makes a complete protein. For people who don’t want to consume a lot of meat, this is a great way to get protein… (there are other combination of foods you can do to get complete proteins also but if I start talking like this too much Jodi will stop me!). Most reviews of this bread said it was crumbly… and it was…. but I sliced up the pieces threw them in the freezer and I’m toasting them for breakfast. You could put honey, peanut butter, butter, or jam on this.


  • Liam

    This recipe is not complete nutritionally as the ingredients must be sprouted or at minimum soaked before they are digestible.

  • Sarah

    What could I use as a replacement for honey? I am allergic to honey.

    • White sugar can usually be substituted straight across. I’m not sure what else would be equivalent without just testing it out. Hope that helps a bit!

    • sherrie

      have you tried Agava? that might be a good sub?

    • Mare

      My niece is, also, allergic to honey. I use maple syrup when making this, or other items calling for honey, for her. Just make sure it’s real maple syrup, not the corn syrup with maple flavoring.

  • Stephanie

    I found the source for your recipe and am still left with the same question – I wonder if the 1 1/2 cups spelt flour should really be listed as 1 1/2 cups spelt berries. All the other ingredients are listed in their whole form. Changing this would certainly help the consistency of the dough.

    • It specifically says to use the spelt flour so I would just grind about 1 1/4 cup spelt berries to get to that amount of the flour.

  • Kathy

    I’ve been making Ezekiel Bread for years and have tried many recipes-the good, the bad, and the completely gross. The best recipe I found was very similar to this one with one surprising ingredient- when grinding up the grains/beans, throw in a 500 mg Vitamin C tablet (not a time release capsule, but the little white pill) and it makes the bread rise up beautifully and turned out a moist, light loaf with no hint of bean flavor. I forget why exactly the vitamin improves the rise, but it really does work. I know it’s a 21st century addition to an ancient recipe, but it’s really good.

    • Kathy

      Oops, the vitamin is supposed to be a 1000 mg. Sorry!

  • Hungry

    I made a bread like this very recently. I also re-made it using the same bean/grain mix, but used it in my standard whole-wheat bread recipe (I replaced some of my whole wheat with the bean flour mix). I liked it much better. As there was more flour it rose like typical bread and was much less crumbly than the Ezekiel recipe (although more crumbly than my typical bread).

    • That’s good to know! I’ve been wanting to try that.

  • The recipe calls for 1/2 cups of Barley, but I have Barley flour. Does anyone know how much Barley flour is equal to 1/2 cup of Barley?

  • Angie

    Thanks for this recipe and review!  I have a diet book (Biggest Loser)that specifies Ezekiel Bread and I had no idea what it was.  I’ll be trying this soon. 

  • Teri

    Usually batter bread has egg in it to hold it together. Do you think adding an egg or egg sub would help it not crumble as much?
    Teri

  • Cee

    I thought Ezekial bread is made from sprouted grains for the additional nutrition that comes from sprouting. Did you sprout your grains? Or am I mistaken about the sprouting?

    • The idea with the Ezekiel bread is that you could live on water and this
      bread alone as Ezekiel does in the bible (see Julie’s little “history
      lesson” above. Making it from sprouted grains WOULD enhance the nutritional
      value but I don’t think it is a necessity for it to be called Ezekiel bread.
      Julie also talks about making sprouted wheat bread at this post:
      http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net/2011/03/07/lets-talk-about-sprouted-bread/

      • Sarah Lee

        My understanding is that the sprouting process uses up the gluten and is probably why it is so crumbly. Essentially, you’re turning a grain into a plant and then making bread with it, so there is a difference, but I’m not sure if the name matters much.  

    • Mare

      I’ve been making Ezekial bread for many years, from a very similar recipe. If I plan on making it ahead of time, I will sprout some wheat berries and add them in, as an extra, just before pouring the batter into the pans. Of coarse, I add sprouted wheat berries to my regular wheat bread, too.

  • Mandy

    I am wanting to come up with a complete protein flour that I can use in all of my cooking, and I was wondering, with this combination of grains and legumes, could it be ground up and used as everyday flour for pancakes, cookies, etc? We LOVE the bread.

    • I haven’t tried that yet, but I definitely want to. I think pancakes
      would be a good place to try it first.
      -Julie

    • Susan

       Mandy, my understanding that Quinoa, pronounced kee-n-wah. It is 100% whole grain. Organic, wheat free and gluten free. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, guarantees it is a complete protein  grain as it stands by itself. I love it myself.

  • I am excited to try this recipe! I love the Ezekiel bread that I buy form the store, but it is expensive, and since no one else in my family cares to much for it, I don’t buy it all the time. Does anyone know if I could grind the beans in my VitaMix? I have the dry canister and can grind wheat in it, but have never tried beans. I was just wondering if anyone else has. Thanks!

    • My mom has an older version and she can. She used it recently for flax seed and it even turned those into solid flour!

  • Love this recipe but I noticed one small error. I printed it out so that I could have it in the kitchen and when I got to the number of pans, it says 2. Let me tell you………2 definately does not work! JAJAJAJAJAJAJA I had a nicely raised gooy mess inside the microwave where I had left it to rise.

    After the cleanup and whatnot, the bread came out awesome! Very tasty and I can’t wait until everyone eats it up so I can do it again! (this time with 3 bread pans). LOL!

  • Jamie

    Oh my, I just made this bread. It is really good! You gotta try this.

  • Jamie

    Oh my, I just made this bread. It is really good! You gotta try this.

  • I find ordering directly from the church to be this best site with the best prices.

    http://www.ldscatalog.com/webapp/wcs/stores/ser

  • You say 1 1/2 cups smelt flour. I just received my spelt berries. How much do yuou use if you use the berries to start. I am really looking forward to trying this bread. I have a friend how is Vegan & I think she would love this. I think it might make a good gift to give to someone during brevement when they don't eat well. We just attending a funeral yesterday & I think my friend would also love some of this bread.

  • You say 1 1/2 cups smelt flour. I just received my spelt berries. How much do yuou use if you use the berries to start. I am really looking forward to trying this bread. I have a friend how is Vegan & I think she would love this. I think it might make a good gift to give to someone during brevement when they don’t eat well. We just attending a funeral yesterday & I think my friend would also love some of this bread.

    • Did anyone answer Lisa’s question about spelt berries vs flour?

  • Marian

    I want to make Ezekiel Bread but I need a resource for buying wheat berries. Any suggestions?

    • Jodi — Food Storage Made Easy

      I believe you could find it at health food stores. Also there are a lot of online sources for food storage foods. You can check out our Links page for some ideas.

  • Marian

    I want to make Ezekiel Bread but I need a resource for buying wheat berries. Any suggestions?

  • Our manual says legumes, corn, etc. are all fine to grind. The only things that shouldn't be ground in an electric grinder are oily things like seeds, nuts, etc. Perhaps some of the inexpensive manual grinders have limitations on what you can grind, but I haven't heard anything specifically.

  • Pam

    I have always been told that if you grind anything other than wheat in your grinder, such as beans, corn etc. it would ruin the grinder eventually. Is there any truth to this? Are there some grinders that are not made to grind other grains?

  • Pam

    I have always been told that if you grind anything other than wheat in your grinder, such as beans, corn etc. it would ruin the grinder eventually. Is there any truth to this? Are there some grinders that are not made to grind other grains?

    • Our manual says legumes, corn, etc. are all fine to grind. The only things that shouldn’t be ground in an electric grinder are oily things like seeds, nuts, etc. Perhaps some of the inexpensive manual grinders have limitations on what you can grind, but I haven’t heard anything specifically.

  • Oh I'm excited about trying this one. I've tried the storebrought bread before, but it was so expensive it didn't end up in my cart again. Interesting book recommendation too, just required it from the library.

  • Oh I’m excited about trying this one. I’ve tried the storebrought bread before, but it was so expensive it didn’t end up in my cart again. Interesting book recommendation too, just required it from the library.

  • Oh I'm excited about trying this one. I've tried the storebrought bread before, but it was so expensive it didn't end up in my cart again. Interesting book recommendation too, just required it from the library.

  • This is an amazing recipe. Thanks for sharing it! Does anyone know about the sprouted version of this bread that can be found in grocery stores?

    • Surretha

      I made the sprouted version of the Ezekiel 4:9 bread. I sprouted all of my grains and legumes, ground them in my Ninja, added leavening ingredients, and baked. We didn’t care for it. I want to experiment with it more to get a better flavor.

  • This is an amazing recipe. Thanks for sharing it! Does anyone know about the sprouted version of this bread that can be found in grocery stores?

  • Anonymous

    We have had a Winco store here in Eureka, California for years. I love that store!

  • bmantel

    We have had a Winco store here in Eureka, California for years. I love that store!

  • Karen

    I have an autistic son who won’t eat meat. I’m always looking for sneaky ways to add protein to his diet. I will definitely try this, although he might balk at the “crumbly” aspect. Maybe French toast? Have you experimented with other recipes that I can add beans and legumes to?

    • Blend cooked beans in your blender with the wet ingredients for most baked goods. You can use it cup for cup to replace all or some of the fat. I always add extra beans. Say a cookie recipe calls for 1 cup shortening, I will add 11/2 cups of beans with the eggs and sugar and purée it in the blender. It makes baked goods moist and fluffy. One tip, match the color of the bean to the finished product (black beans in brownies, pintos in oatmeal cookies, white beans in sugar cookies). This even fools my husband who won’t eat beans of any kind, or so he thinks.

  • By the way, thanks for passing along the information.

  • Wow, I didn't know the difference would be that much. I may have to get a little more serious about getting a grinder!

  • By the way, thanks for passing along the information.

  • Wow, I didn't know the difference would be that much. I may have to get a little more serious about getting a grinder!

  • Karen

    I have an autistic son who won't eat meat. I'm always looking for sneaky ways to add protein to his diet. I will definitely try this, although he might balk at the “crumbly” aspect. Maybe French toast? Have you experimented with other recipes that I can add beans and legumes to?

  • Kristine

    You can buy Ezekial Mix already made up at Walton Feed (online). I have milled and used it in recipes just as I would whole wheat flour. Since I use my normal bread recipe, it isn’t crumbly, but I can taste a hint of “beaniness” to it.

  • Kristine

    You can buy Ezekial Mix already made up at Walton Feed (online). I have milled and used it in recipes just as I would whole wheat flour. Since I use my normal bread recipe, it isn't crumbly, but I can taste a hint of “beaniness” to it.

  • Janet, I think the cost of all 3 loves was around 3.50 (if I did the math right on the honey)…. the grains and legumes in bulk are CHEAP! If you get honey and oil in bulk or on sale its a great price savings

  • Janet, I think the cost of all 3 loves was around 3.50 (if I did the math right on the honey)…. the grains and legumes in bulk are CHEAP! If you get honey and oil in bulk or on sale its a great price savings

  • I don't have a grinder (not yet anyway), so I can't make this from scratch, but I am curious to know how the cost of making it yourself compares to buying it from the health food store. I can get a loaf at the store here for about $3.30.

  • I don't have a grinder (not yet anyway), so I can't make this from scratch, but I am curious to know how the cost of making it yourself compares to buying it from the health food store. I can get a loaf at the store here for about $3.30.

  • tried bread pudding from this yum- make when it is slightly stale or to use up crumbly bits

  • tried bread pudding from this yum- make when it is slightly stale or to use up crumbly bits