Jodi’s Food Storage Summary – Month 1

Here is what I have in my food storage so far:

  • Water – 6 two-liter bottles
  • 72 Hour Kits – 3 complete kits (over 2 years old)
  • Baking Goods – 10 lbs flour, 1 can salt, 2 lbs each brown and powdered sugar
  • Baby Items – 1 can formula
  • Grains, Cereals, Rice, Pasta, etc. – 1 lb white rice, 13 lbs dried beans, 3 boxes instant oatmeal, 2 boxes cream of wheat, 2 boxes of cold cereal, 2 boxes kraft dinner, multiple sprouting seeds, several spares of common spices
  • Commercial Soups – 2 chunky campbell’s, 5 tomato, 4 chicken noodle, 1 cream of chicken
  • Canned Fruits and Veggies – 6 qts. peaches, 1 can fruit cocktail, 1 can mandarin oranges, 5 qts. tomatoes
  • Psychological Foods – 3 qts. pickles, 3 jars tomato sauce, 2 pts. salsa, 1 small jar mayonnaise
  • Non-Food – contact solution, shampoo, toothbrushes, washclothes

Hopefully by next month I will have added a LOT more to these shelves. I’m definitely going to have to rearrange them and better utilize the space. I also need to compile some sort of spreadsheet to keep track of what I have and what I still need. All in good time.

  • Anonymous

    always enjoy comign back to your original posts. you’ve come a long way baby! as the old commercial used to say.

  • Grandma Shirley Nelson

    Hey, Julie and Jodi – – you are doing great on your Food Storage site. I’m so proud of you. I have a quick suggestion: When storing bags of dry stuff, like flour, wheat, rice, etc., put blocks of wood or something underneath, rather than putting the bags directly on the cement (if in basement). You only need to have water in your basement once to see stuff like that get ruined.
    Keep up the good work. I like the simple approach for those just beginning their storage

  • Grandma Shirley Nelson

    Hey, Julie and Jodi – – you are doing great on your Food Storage site. I’m so proud of you. I have a quick suggestion: When storing bags of dry stuff, like flour, wheat, rice, etc., put blocks of wood or something underneath, rather than putting the bags directly on the cement (if in basement). You only need to have water in your basement once to see stuff like that get ruined.
    Keep up the good work. I like the simple approach for those just beginning their storage

  • jweiss08

    I think there are A LOT of us just getting started. It seems a lot less overwhelming to be doing this together and sharing tips along the way!

  • jweiss08

    I think there are A LOT of us just getting started. It seems a lot less overwhelming to be doing this together and sharing tips along the way!

  • Rebecca McLaren

    You’ve done a great job! I’m just getting started on mine aswell.

  • Rebecca McLaren

    You’ve done a great job! I’m just getting started on mine aswell.

  • Jodi

    Ah yes, you are looking at the tomatoes on the top shelf and envisioning some major problems! You can tell I’m just a beginner. hehe. I was just so proud to actually have some home-canned food stored at all.

    This is great advice we will probably add to the site. Thanks Kelly!

  • Jodi

    Ah yes, you are looking at the tomatoes on the top shelf and envisioning some major problems! You can tell I’m just a beginner. hehe. I was just so proud to actually have some home-canned food stored at all.

    This is great advice we will probably add to the site. Thanks Kelly!

  • Kelly

    So, I just taught a whole stake seminar on earthquake preparedness. And since you’re talking about rearranging your shelves, I thought I’d throw you a tip. Put all the lightest stuff at the top of your shelves and work down to your heaviest / most breakable items. So, toilet paper, kleenex boxes, etc. at the top. Cereal boxes next. Put heavy cans, chemicals, and glass jars at the bottom. Glass should be stored inside a box. That way, in an earthquake as items fall 1) you’ll protect yourself if you’re nearby, 2) you won’t have to clean up broken glass and spilled chemicals if they have lower gravitational potential energy and don’t break, and 3) you’ll preserve your items so you can still use them.

  • Kelly

    So, I just taught a whole stake seminar on earthquake preparedness. And since you’re talking about rearranging your shelves, I thought I’d throw you a tip. Put all the lightest stuff at the top of your shelves and work down to your heaviest / most breakable items. So, toilet paper, kleenex boxes, etc. at the top. Cereal boxes next. Put heavy cans, chemicals, and glass jars at the bottom. Glass should be stored inside a box. That way, in an earthquake as items fall 1) you’ll protect yourself if you’re nearby, 2) you won’t have to clean up broken glass and spilled chemicals if they have lower gravitational potential energy and don’t break, and 3) you’ll preserve your items so you can still use them.

  • Tracy

    What did all that cost? Estimates are ok…

  • Tracy

    What did all that cost? Estimates are ok…