72 Hour/Disaster Kits for Babies/Toddlers

Due to popular demand, we have put together a comprehensive list of things you may want to consider including in your disaster kit if you have babies or toddlers at home. Remember these are only guidelines, and you should customize everything to suit the needs of your own family. Hopefully we will be able to get these ideas incorporated into our Emergency Preparedness Plan eventually so it’s all in one place!

If you have an infant or a toddler at home, consider including these items as you put together your disaster and 72 hour kits for your family:

  • Instant formula. Make sure to buy the kind you do not need to mix with water. Also, track expiration dates and rotate through them frequently.
  • 5 small bottles for the formula. You can fill them with purified water to provide extra drinking water in your kit.
  • Refrigerated bottle bag. This is helpful in case you get the chance to warm up or cool down the formula you can keep it at that temperature for around 4 hours.
  • Plenty of diapers. The exact number needed depends on the age of your child. I recommend including about 20 disposables and also 3 cloth ones that can be washed, dried and reused in case you run out.
  • A travel package of wipes. These are great for washing as well. If you have space I’d recommend just storing a full box of wet wipes.
  • Pacifiers. Put in two just in case. If you’re stressed the baby will probably be stressed and it’s a comfort for them.
  • 3 cotton/flannel wraps, and 2 muslin wraps.
  • Baby food. Depending on the age of your child you will probably want to include some jars of baby food. Once your baby can eat mostly regular foods just pop these out of your kit.
  • Washcloths. Stored around 10 small ones, it’s an eventuality, you’ll require them at some point.
  • Small comfort toy/s. If you child has a specific toy or blanket that he/she really loves, try to grab that in an emergency. But if you can’t, then try to have a usable substitute that will help comfort the child in lieu of their favorite item.
  • Clothes – and plenty of them! This is a tough one as babies grow so fast. One trick I recommend is that as you swap out their closets to put in the next size of clothes to remember to do that in the disaster kit at the same time. Make sure to include clothes for all types of weather and include lots of spares.
  • Ziplock bags. These work great for storing used diapers or anything else that is dirty, or clean for that matter.
  • Bulb nose syringe and saline. Saline loosens mucous and syringe sucks water/mucous/misc out of ears, nose, mouth etc. You never know if you’ll need one so it’s great to keep in your kit.
  • Infant tylenol/motrin. It never fails that kids get sick as soon as you are somewhere WITHOUT your medicine. So this is a definite requirement for any child disaster kit.
  • Desatin or other diaper rash cream and travel-sized baby powder. The last thing you’d want in an emergency situation is a sore bum and nothing to treat it with. This will be especially useful if you have to resort to using cloth diapers.

The most important thing to remember is to always be thinking about what is appropriate for your child’s age and stage of development. For example, if your child is no longer drinking bottles then there is no reason to keep formula in your disaster kit.

  • Lizz

    Thank you for writing this with formula feeding parents in mind. So many of the other ones I’ve seen are just a big piece on how I should magically grow working breasts in an emergency and hope that they can magically digest lactose.

    I know that it’s a situation that we all don’t like to think about but having formula on hand in the case that you are severely injured or dead might be a good idea even if you are a breastfeeding family. If you are a pumping Mom and the emergency where the power is down happens while your gone can make it so that baby can eat.

    For older babies a cup can be used in an emergency because it’s easier to clean then a bottle. Also for a 72 hour kit these might be good http://www.steribottle.com/

    Also these: http://www.toysrus.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3441674&cp=2255957.2273443.3426509.3426511.3679137.3426555&parentPage=family Nursers come in 8oz and 2 oz and you can just use a normal bottle nipple.

    • Becca

      I agree! not all of us can breastfeed! And especially if you are injured or something happens, you have backup!! Good idea to pack at least some for breastfeeding moms.

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  • amanda

    One thing I’ve added to my baby’s kit is a Moby wrap. It’s lightweight and packable and can be used for various other purposes. Any carrier is a good idea to have.

  • Sasha

    Lots of little comments:

    - Diaper rash is more rare with cloth diapers, but when it happens you can’t use cream and cloth simultaneously! The cream is meant to keep the bum dry, but it also winds up keeping the diaper dry and so it leaks everywhere… I use gDiapers, so I can carry both cloth and disposable liners. :-)

    - Breastfeed breastfeed breastfeed! Cuts that supply list in half.

    - If your outerwear covers the baby in your carrier too, then your baby needs considerably less clothing. That’s how we do all our outdoor time already!

    - Pack at least one spare carrier! Mine have been covered in poop and splurf and ick more times than I can count.

    - Anyone here given thought to actually carrying everything of baby’s, and mama’s, AND the baby during a real bug out? Scares me half to death…

    In cahoots…

    • amanda

      My kit is pretty heavy with all of baby’s gear and mine as well. It’s manageable as long as I’m in a healthy state. I suggest moms workout hike run etc. If terrain is even then I’ve heard of people using luggage carriers. I’m not sure my 4 year old will be able to carry his pack very far so I might invest in something like this just in case. As far as the breastfeeding comment goes…I second it, however my fear is if something happens to me what will baby eat. Having some formula and feeding supplies is a good idea…this can be kept separate from your pack too and can be grabbed if needed or left if not.

    • BubbasMomma

      Thank you. I love this reply. It is everything I believe, too.

  • heather

    for a toddler i’d also stitch a contact label into his jackets if he’s in a preschool for an out of state contact “family preferably” and your cell numbers but if it’s bad enough you can’t get to the kid the shelter they end up in will want to have a contact. and hankerchiefs when kids are smaller than a hundred ten pound you can use them for everything from sprained ankles to hair control to emergency bandages.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      Great tip!

  • http://www.facebook.com/holly.turner.5201 Holly Turner

    Laminate the family picture someone else suggested. You can buy the laminate in the office supply section of Walmart. Fed Ex Kinkos has let me use their laminator machine for free, ask them to show how to use it.
    For walkers I recommend buying dog tags for identification, there are machines at Walmart or pet stores. We got heart shaped ones and put them on his shoes(on the laces or threading rings for laces). You will need to play with spacing on the lines to make all desired information fit. On the first line, we did a shortened version of his first name with last name, so the name of the found child was clear. We did home phone number with area code, you could indicate H for home number if it fits. Then on last two lines, we put parents first names only and then cell phone numbers (without area code), followed by the word “cell”. We figured that they might deduce that we have the same last name, and that the cell phone area code may be the same as the cells. As he got a bit older we taught him to show people his tag if they asked him his name, until he has everything memorized.
    I’d recommend a tag for each likely pair of shoes. You just have to remember to remove it to put it on the next larger size shoe before you throw them away. (We save clothes but learned wearing someone else shoes is bad for a developing childs feet ie buy children new shoes if possible).
    My Mom tried to pick up my unaccompanied niece at the airport and she forgot her ID. She was only 5 and didn’t really know Grandma. They only let her take her because she had a picture of her(this is 20ish years ago/doubt it would work now). It would be great to have a laminated family picture(have a current family picture on your cell phone) plus your name on the dog tag would match drivers licenses/ID cards. At an event, an insurance company made laminated lost child ID cards with picture listing childs: full name, our home address, DOB, hair color, eye color, race, height, weight, indicated if he wears glasses, gender, our email addresses, birthmarks (try to find something that would identifying with needing to remove clothing), parents names, home and cell phone numbers, thumbprint and it indicated the date it was created. So I could show this too. In my wallet I keep a dated card with his current height/weight. You could also get a child hat is 2 or older a state ID (they change/grow a lot the first two years).
    I also decided crock “shoes” have their place and usefulness. When we went to Disneyland we brought in a lot of stuff and so I didn’t want to drag around water sock shoes. On days we were going into California Adventure and planned to play in the water (there is a fountain in the asphalt across from the door into “The Little Mermaid-Ariel’s Undersea Adventure” in the terraced “garden” area near the water where you stand to see World of Color, also in the center of Bugs Land there are two water play areas back to back-one is a laminar fountain the other identified by a giant pretend faucet) I would just put on sock and crocks in the morning. Just before water play, I change him into swim top and bottom, remove socks and replace crocks. Disney asks that no one go barefoot and one shouldn’t. When he was done I’d dry him with a towel we brought(hand towel or we’d buy full size souvenir and it would double as a blanket and came in handy after getting wet from world of color or rain), using it to dry the crocks too and throw the wet stuff in a bag. We did this in the late afternoon and would dress him in clean socks, long pants, top layers, jacket to warm back up and keep warm for evening/saving seats for evening shows(World of Color). Twice while traveling my son stepped in puddles and crocks could’ve been quickly washed with soap and dried. AND they are much lighter than regular shoes as a backup.
    Another thing we we’ve found handy for 2.5-4 year old is putting those short (homemade) videos from our cell phone onto a mp3 video player for entertainment. You can use a cell but know it will be dropped. We also have headphones. My husband did this for our trip and we took the player/headphones into Disneyland. If you haven’t been you are exhausted and it was a break from parenting all day (get down off that!) He would be occupied while we saved our spots for evening shows. He wants to watch videos while we shop etc.
    Also I recommend small toys: a small bottle of bubbles double ziplocked, a bouncy ball, a small car, a bendable gumby like character, a keychain flashlight, glowstick on a string/lanyard, tiny container of playdough, paper & crayons in a ziplock (beware they melt, I have not tested the Twistables- fine pointed colored pencils may not distract) or compact markers, inflatable small beach balls, tiny travel books, stickers, masking tape/duct tape around a pencil to make a “road” for a small car…

  • http://www.facebook.com/lindy.v.wilson Lindy Victoria Wilson

    Ok so this may be TMI for some, but breastmilk/nursing can replace many of the items on this list. Obviously formula and bottles (though I understand having a back up but do realize supplementing with formula could lower a nursing mother’s milk supply thus causing a feeding problem at the worst possible time), but nursing also acts as a pacifer/comfort item and breastmilk can be squirted up a baby’s nose to loosen mucus like the saline solution. It can also be put in ears and eyes to prevent/treat infections. Also it’s very soothing on diaper rash (which is rarer with cloth diapers BUT can happen due to washing issues and the need for babies to be changed more frequently).

  • http://www.facebook.com/lindy.v.wilson Lindy Victoria Wilson

    Oh and totally agree about babywearing! I love wearing my baby! It makes life so much easier! It also makes nursing (which of course is very helpful in emergency situations and a huge money saver) very easy as the carrier makes breastfeeding very discrete and hands-free! I would like to mention however that Moby wraps while nice, are not recommended for wearing children on your back. The stretchy t-shirt like material will stretch as the weight of the baby pulls it, making it less secure and therefore a fall hazard for back carries (front carries are fine but many ppl find Moby’s aren’t as supportive for older babies and toddlers as well as uncomfortable for the wearer) . I would recommend a Bali Stretch Wrapsody Baby Carrier or a woven wrap such as Walter’s Organics.

  • http://www.facebook.com/lindy.v.wilson Lindy Victoria Wilson

    As a first time mom, I found cloth diapers a life saver for our budget. There is one brand called Econobum that makes a kit with 3 adjustable covers (will fit most babies from newborns to 30+lb toddlers) with 12 cloth inserts (prefolds- depending on age of baby, this is enough to get you through about 2 days worth of diaper changes) and a wet bag for storing dirty diapers between washings for under $50! Two kits would be ideal, 3 would be perfection. Also as far as clothes, I bought lots of gender neutral clothing with some pink stuff and girly accessories for my daughter. I have enough clothes to get through the first year and more with any subsequent babies of any gender. Think basics and think things that they won’t grow out of as fast like t-shirts instead of all onesies and Babylegs (baby leg warmers that can be put on their arms and legs for layering) in addition to pants, sweaters and PJs. About a dozen outfits in each size will get you through if you wash every few days. Stop buying cutesy stuff and think practical! If you had to take baby on a trip for a long weekend to an unknown destination with no idea of weather conditions, what would you bring? It’s a short trip so you can’t bring tons but you also need outfits that can be warm.

  • Kayla Kaye

    It might be a good idea to store all of this in a backpack or small luggage with wheels, as it will be pretty heavy, and you will be carrying the baby, and possibly other 72-hour backpacks as well. Great list- I was just thinking about this!

  • Shannonlaforme

    I also keep a carry backpack on hand and in the car, the biggest i could find that will hold the child high up on the back. Even though my boy is a toddler if in an emergency we needed to walk anywhere or “bug out” I know he wouldn’t be able to walk very long. Instead of having to carry him among everything else I plan to slip him into the backpack and away we go.

  • Jk Tannefamily

    Thanks you for making my job as Food storage specialist in my ward so much easier!!!!!

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  • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

    Ya cloth diapers would be better, who knows how long you will be out and you don't want to run out of disposables with no other options! ick

  • http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/chassidy.evans Chassidy

    I would like to add cloth diapers! We only cloth diaper here, no sposies! There are loads of new styles out there. We store extra water for washing them in, but they are great because we have the one that are one size. That way, no worrying about having to keep up the stockpiles with current sizes. I keep the majority of my stash here at home, but keep extras in the car just in case.You never know if you will home when something happens or not.

    As far as rashes and such as a pp said, my kids have never had a rash and only wear cloth. So, it may have been the detergent washed in (I make my own laundry detergent) or the material or something against the baby's skin.

    Also, I have two moby wraps, one for each child. If needed, I can carry both babies at one time (one on my back and one on the front). Moby wraps are my favorite baby wraps and highly recommend them to everyone!

  • http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/chassidy.evans Chassidy

    I would like to add cloth diapers! We only cloth diaper here, no sposies! There are loads of new styles out there. We store extra water for washing them in, but they are great because we have the one that are one size. That way, no worrying about having to keep up the stockpiles with current sizes. I keep the majority of my stash here at home, but keep extras in the car just in case.You never know if you will home when something happens or not.

    As far as rashes and such as a pp said, my kids have never had a rash and only wear cloth. So, it may have been the detergent washed in (I make my own laundry detergent) or the material or something against the baby’s skin.

    Also, I have two moby wraps, one for each child. If needed, I can carry both babies at one time (one on my back and one on the front). Moby wraps are my favorite baby wraps and highly recommend them to everyone!

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Ya cloth diapers would be better, who knows how long you will be out and you don’t want to run out of disposables with no other options! ick

    • heather

      Mobies are not recomended and can be very dangerous for back carries but if you have a good neck scarf you can african carry a baby up to 20ish pounds on your back preferably a wide silk or cotton one.

  • Imdeborah

    I'd like to add a sling or wrap-style baby carrier. I got stuck in the snow about 1 1/2 miles from home (the middle of nowhere) with a 2 year old and a new baby and no way to call anyone. I took off my coat, put the 2 year old on my back, put the baby inside my sweater, covered them both with my coat and walked home. I don' think I could have done it without being able to strap the kids onto my body. Now one sling per child is in our 72 hour kits, even for the 5 year old.

  • Imdeborah

    I’d like to add a sling or wrap-style baby carrier. I got stuck in the snow about 1 1/2 miles from home (the middle of nowhere) with a 2 year old and a new baby and no way to call anyone. I took off my coat, put the 2 year old on my back, put the baby inside my sweater, covered them both with my coat and walked home. I don’ think I could have done it without being able to strap the kids onto my body. Now one sling per child is in our 72 hour kits, even for the 5 year old.

  • http://www.roundaboutkidsbabypouches.com/ Baby Pouches

    Thank you for sharing this very useful list. If you are a parent you should have all of these useful stuffs for your baby.

  • GnV

    This is a really great list! One thing I never leave without is gas drops. Most of the tummy aches that my kids get are because of gas. My oldest can take an adult size, in an emergency, because simethecone (sp?) is pretty safe. But, I do like to have the drops for the younger ones.

  • Anonymous

    This is a really great list! One thing I never leave without is gas drops. Most of the tummy aches that my kids get are because of gas. My oldest can take an adult size, in an emergency, because simethecone (sp?) is pretty safe. But, I do like to have the drops for the younger ones.

  • GnV

    This is a really great list! One thing I never leave without is gas drops. Most of the tummy aches that my kids get are because of gas. My oldest can take an adult size, in an emergency, because simethecone (sp?) is pretty safe. But, I do like to have the drops for the younger ones.

  • Anonymous

    Babies and Toddlers 72 Hour or Disaster Kits
    These came to mind after reading your article….·
    Camping wipes to use to bathe baby preferably the disposable kind
    Baby foods are great to keep in bag if baby needs a lighter diet if gets sick. Suggest food warmers that are used to warm up emergency foods included here for liquids or foods that need warming. A small spoon and straw might prove useful.
    Clothes especially for rain, snow and extremely hot weather.
    The baby powder is soothing for all little one’s creases during hot weather.
    First aid kit include child safety pins, thermometer, sunscreen also the dryer sheets for bug repellent, orajel for teething pain and some type of teether. Button comes off or something won’t close then bring needle and thread.
    A few comfort toys … include a small soft toy that is easy to wash & dry quickly and a small book with pictures and a small soft ball that doesn’t roll far.
    For older toddlers…a goodie bag with non choking types of goodies to pop in the mouth one at a time.. cereal, fun crackers, tiny cookies, soft mints, Variety: soft/crunch/ quick dissolving/ chewy/ No lollipops, gum, sticky or choking type items.
    Vitamins of a fun type that child likes
    Disposable camera
    Real small flashlight
    Organize these into separate baggies
    Keep a list of all that is in the carrying case including expiration dates and keep it handy in a baggie in the case.

  • Anonymous

    Babies and Toddlers 72 Hour or Disaster Kits
    These came to mind after reading your article….·
    Camping wipes to use to bathe baby preferably the disposable kind
    Baby foods are great to keep in bag if baby needs a lighter diet if gets sick. Suggest food warmers that are used to warm up emergency foods included here for liquids or foods that need warming. A small spoon and straw might prove useful.
    Clothes especially for rain, snow and extremely hot weather.
    The baby powder is soothing for all little one’s creases during hot weather.
    First aid kit include child safety pins, thermometer, sunscreen also the dryer sheets for bug repellent, orajel for teething pain and some type of teether. Button comes off or something won’t close then bring needle and thread.
    A few comfort toys … include a small soft toy that is easy to wash & dry quickly and a small book with pictures and a small soft ball that doesn’t roll far.
    For older toddlers…a goodie bag with non choking types of goodies to pop in the mouth one at a time.. cereal, fun crackers, tiny cookies, soft mints, Variety: soft/crunch/ quick dissolving/ chewy/ No lollipops, gum, sticky or choking type items.
    Vitamins of a fun type that child likes
    Disposable camera
    Real small flashlight
    Organize these into separate bags
    Keep a list of all that is in the carrying case including expiration dates and keep it handy in a baggie in the case.
    ·

  • tedy

    Babies and Toddlers 72 Hour or Disaster Kits
    These came to mind after reading your article….·
    Camping wipes to use to bathe baby preferably the disposable kind
    Baby foods are great to keep in bag if baby needs a lighter diet if gets sick. Suggest food warmers that are used to warm up emergency foods included here for liquids or foods that need warming. A small spoon and straw might prove useful.
    Clothes especially for rain, snow and extremely hot weather.
    The baby powder is soothing for all little one’s creases during hot weather.
    First aid kit include child safety pins, thermometer, sunscreen also the dryer sheets for bug repellent, orajel for teething pain and some type of teether. Button comes off or something won’t close then bring needle and thread.
    A few comfort toys … include a small soft toy that is easy to wash & dry quickly and a small book with pictures and a small soft ball that doesn’t roll far.
    For older toddlers…a goodie bag with non choking types of goodies to pop in the mouth one at a time.. cereal, fun crackers, tiny cookies, soft mints, Variety: soft/crunch/ quick dissolving/ chewy/ No lollipops, gum, sticky or choking type items.
    Vitamins of a fun type that child likes
    Disposable camera
    Real small flashlight
    Organize these into separate baggies
    Keep a list of all that is in the carrying case including expiration dates and keep it handy in a baggie in the case.

  • tedy

    Babies and Toddlers 72 Hour or Disaster Kits
    These came to mind after reading your article….·
    Camping wipes to use to bathe baby preferably the disposable kind
    Baby foods are great to keep in bag if baby needs a lighter diet if gets sick. Suggest food warmers that are used to warm up emergency foods included here for liquids or foods that need warming. A small spoon and straw might prove useful.
    Clothes especially for rain, snow and extremely hot weather.
    The baby powder is soothing for all little one’s creases during hot weather.
    First aid kit include child safety pins, thermometer, sunscreen also the dryer sheets for bug repellent, orajel for teething pain and some type of teether. Button comes off or something won’t close then bring needle and thread.
    A few comfort toys … include a small soft toy that is easy to wash & dry quickly and a small book with pictures and a small soft ball that doesn’t roll far.
    For older toddlers…a goodie bag with non choking types of goodies to pop in the mouth one at a time.. cereal, fun crackers, tiny cookies, soft mints, Variety: soft/crunch/ quick dissolving/ chewy/ No lollipops, gum, sticky or choking type items.
    Vitamins of a fun type that child likes
    Disposable camera
    Real small flashlight
    Organize these into separate bags
    Keep a list of all that is in the carrying case including expiration dates and keep it handy in a baggie in the case.
    ·

  • Jessica

    I’d recommend a NoseFrida instead of a bulb syringe, both in and out of the emergency pack. It is so much more effective at unclogging little noses. I’m also including teething gel, because you never know if you’ll need it but it can make a screaming, teething baby calm down faster than Tylenol, which is good for the baby and the nerves of everyone him/her!

    I thought baby powder was no longer recommended. I’ve never used it on either of my kids.

    Pipe cleaners are a very compact but entertaining little thing to keep toddlers/preschoolers occupied and entertained.

    Another thing: if you have a picky toddler, formula may be good to keep in the kit, since it’s a more complete nutrition than cocoa mix. When I ran out of milk recently, I mixed some up for my 3 year old and he drank it without question. It’s an option for the picky toddler.

    I love my sling, but I’m not packing it up. Instead, like Megan, I store it in a closet near the door, where my purse and shoes are, so I’d grab it if we needed to evacuate.

  • Jessica

    I’d recommend a NoseFrida instead of a bulb syringe, both in and out of the emergency pack. It is so much more effective at unclogging little noses. I’m also including teething gel, because you never know if you’ll need it but it can make a screaming, teething baby calm down faster than Tylenol, which is good for the baby and the nerves of everyone him/her!

    I thought baby powder was no longer recommended. I’ve never used it on either of my kids.

    Pipe cleaners are a very compact but entertaining little thing to keep toddlers/preschoolers occupied and entertained.

    Another thing: if you have a picky toddler, formula may be good to keep in the kit, since it’s a more complete nutrition than cocoa mix. When I ran out of milk recently, I mixed some up for my 3 year old and he drank it without question. It’s an option for the picky toddler.

    I love my sling, but I’m not packing it up. Instead, like Megan, I store it in a closet near the door, where my purse and shoes are, so I’d grab it if we needed to evacuate.

  • Kari

    Another good thing for kids, and maybe adults too, is to have a current picture of their family in a ziploc bag. If they are ever lost they can show someone a picture of their family which would make it easier for someone to help them.

  • Kari

    Another good thing for kids, and maybe adults too, is to have a current picture of their family in a ziploc bag. If they are ever lost they can show someone a picture of their family which would make it easier for someone to help them.

  • Jodi

    Jennifer, Thanks for the note about cloth diapers. I have never used cloth diapers before, but my mom said that when she used them with some of her older kids we always had diaper rashes. Disposable diapers keep the moisture away from directly touching the body. I think it could possibly be if you get it changed right away you are fine but if the baby is sitting in it for any amount of time it could cause irritation. It also could depend on the sensitivity of each child, the quality of the diapers, etc. Anyway, either way it’s a good idea to bring bum cream!

  • Jodi

    Jennifer, Thanks for the note about cloth diapers. I have never used cloth diapers before, but my mom said that when she used them with some of her older kids we always had diaper rashes. Disposable diapers keep the moisture away from directly touching the body. I think it could possibly be if you get it changed right away you are fine but if the baby is sitting in it for any amount of time it could cause irritation. It also could depend on the sensitivity of each child, the quality of the diapers, etc. Anyway, either way it’s a good idea to bring bum cream!

    • Megan

      Looks like the FSME girls need a lesson in modern cloth diapers! They are NOT what your mom used. There are many fabrics that keep moisture away from baby’s bum better than disposables and most babies do MUCH better in cloth diapers as far as rashes go.

      • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

        We’ll have to look into it :) Thanks

  • Megan

    Something else to consider (and this is a great list, thanks! There are a few things on the list that I had not thought of in my kit!) in an emergency situation is how you will keep your little one safe. A really great thing to have is a sling/pouch/babycarrier. Even if it’s not something you usually use, in an emergency situation it could be a real life saver. What if it’s an earthquake or flood, and you need to somehow hold your baby or toddler, but you also need both hands to climb over stuff, or hold on to things? What if you have to live in an emergency shelter for a couple of days with lots of other families, wouldn’t it be great to be able to keep your little one safely close by in a sling or something similar? I use my sling enough that I don’t want to put it away in my emergency kit, but I keep it by the door, and I also know of several ways to fashion and makeshift baby carrier. This great website has some short videos on how to do it and why! http://www.wearyourbaby.com/Default.aspx?tabid=169

  • Megan

    Something else to consider (and this is a great list, thanks! There are a few things on the list that I had not thought of in my kit!) in an emergency situation is how you will keep your little one safe. A really great thing to have is a sling/pouch/babycarrier. Even if it’s not something you usually use, in an emergency situation it could be a real life saver. What if it’s an earthquake or flood, and you need to somehow hold your baby or toddler, but you also need both hands to climb over stuff, or hold on to things? What if you have to live in an emergency shelter for a couple of days with lots of other families, wouldn’t it be great to be able to keep your little one safely close by in a sling or something similar? I use my sling enough that I don’t want to put it away in my emergency kit, but I keep it by the door, and I also know of several ways to fashion and makeshift baby carrier. This great website has some short videos on how to do it and why! http://www.wearyourbaby.com/Default.aspx?tabid=169

  • http://jenniferslanguishing.blogspot.com/ Jennifer

    This is a great list (and timely, as I live in Moorhead, right across the river from Fargo, ND). I do take issue, though, with your suggestion that the bum cream would be most useful if you had to use the cloth diapers: my daughter, now 3, wore cloth diapers all the way to the end, and only got a diaper rash in paper diapers. I think cloth diapers get a bad rap, and in reality are often better for baby bottoms.

  • http://jenniferslanguishing.blogspot.com/ Jennifer

    This is a great list (and timely, as I live in Moorhead, right across the river from Fargo, ND). I do take issue, though, with your suggestion that the bum cream would be most useful if you had to use the cloth diapers: my daughter, now 3, wore cloth diapers all the way to the end, and only got a diaper rash in paper diapers. I think cloth diapers get a bad rap, and in reality are often better for baby bottoms.

  • Ellie

    I like to use the ziploc bags to keep my stuff organized in my kit. For example, I put all the clothes in one bag, all the baby food in one bag, all the desitin, washcloths, other hygiene items in one bag, diapers in one or two bags, etc. This way my stuff is organized and easy to find and I can always dump the stuff out and use the bag if I need to. It also helps me separate different sizes of diapers since I have 2 kids that wear them. I also feel better knowing that there’s no way the desitin will get close to the baby food, which kind of grosses me out. BTW, I do the same thing in our kits for older people — 1 or 2 bags each for clothes, food, hygiene, etc. Grocery bags are also good for containing messes. They are bigger than ziplocs and free. It’s nice to have some of both.

  • Ellie

    I like to use the ziploc bags to keep my stuff organized in my kit. For example, I put all the clothes in one bag, all the baby food in one bag, all the desitin, washcloths, other hygiene items in one bag, diapers in one or two bags, etc. This way my stuff is organized and easy to find and I can always dump the stuff out and use the bag if I need to. It also helps me separate different sizes of diapers since I have 2 kids that wear them. I also feel better knowing that there’s no way the desitin will get close to the baby food, which kind of grosses me out. BTW, I do the same thing in our kits for older people — 1 or 2 bags each for clothes, food, hygiene, etc. Grocery bags are also good for containing messes. They are bigger than ziplocs and free. It’s nice to have some of both.

  • Vicki

    When my kids were little, I took a blanket sleeper a size bigger than what they were wearing at that time, and put the baby’s special needs (bottles, formula, diapers, etc.) inside the sleeper. it was convenient, and when my baby grew to the next size, it was easy to just replace that sleeper with one the next size up, and the one that had been in my kit was now the right size for my baby to wear. One size bigger would not be a big deal for the baby to wear in an emergency, and it saves having to buy a lot of extra clothes that likely won’t get worn.

  • Vicki

    When my kids were little, I took a blanket sleeper a size bigger than what they were wearing at that time, and put the baby’s special needs (bottles, formula, diapers, etc.) inside the sleeper. it was convenient, and when my baby grew to the next size, it was easy to just replace that sleeper with one the next size up, and the one that had been in my kit was now the right size for my baby to wear. One size bigger would not be a big deal for the baby to wear in an emergency, and it saves having to buy a lot of extra clothes that likely won’t get worn.