The 7 Day Challenge: DAY 1 (WEDNESDAY)

d17d

There has been a flood and everyone in your city has been told to evacuate their homes for part of the day.

limits1

  • For this day, and ALL days of the challenge: no spending money, no going to stores, and no restaurants.
  • You have no power for the whole day (except to fill out the questionnaire, or chat on facebook about what you are learning!)
  • You have to “leave” your house within an hour for at least 5 hours (but you don’t know if your house is going to be there when you get back).
  • You can only grab what is in your disasters kit and ALREADY on your grab listΒ  when you leave.Β  *remember your house may be destroyed when you get back
  • You have to eat the food from your 72 hour kit while you are gone
  • Your family gets soaking wet during evacuation, and one of your family members cuts their toe open
  • Your spouse is at work. You have to meet at your pre-determined meeting location when he or she is done work
  • Once your whole family reunites you can return to your house
  • When you get home, your fridge food is ruined, your basement food is flooded, and you need to make dinner with no power
  • Keep your family entertained with no power (remember, after dark the lights, tv, appliances etc wont work!)
  • ADVANCED “FOLKS” (for anyone who feels up to it)

  • You have to stay out of your house until it’s bed time
  • You can only eat your 72 hour kit food the whole day
  • You forgot your cell phone at home when you evacuated

REMEMBER, TOMORROW’S LIMITATIONS AND TASKS WILL BE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT. How long would you have lasted under these conditions?

7win

Each day we will be giving a prize to someone who provided feedback to that day’s challenge.Β  *Click here to see who won the “pre-challenge” giveaway. To provide feedback on today’s challenge, do one of the following:

7face1
face723

ques71

To be filled out at the END of the day.
Remember this is for us all to learn so fill it out honestly!

[form 2 “Day 1 Questionnaire”]
  • kathy fletcher

    I just had an idea. What about those backpack water packs hikers and mt bikers use? I just bought one for our freshman college student because she is taking a mountain bike course. You could have one for each member of the family stored with the water containers. Then in an emergency, fill each one up real quick. Then each person carries their own on their back. They sell them at walmart and come in different sizes. They would at least hold enough water for a day or maybe two.
    kathy

  • kathy fletcher

    I just had an idea. What about those backpack water packs hikers and mt bikers use? I just bought one for our freshman college student because she is taking a mountain bike course. You could have one for each member of the family stored with the water containers. Then in an emergency, fill each one up real quick. Then each person carries their own on their back. They sell them at walmart and come in different sizes. They would at least hold enough water for a day or maybe two.
    kathy

  • Ashley

    I think many of us realized we weren’t as “set” as we thought. One big surprise for us was coming home knowing there was no power, but kept using flashlight to turn on switches, then quickly turned them off again. Really surprised we didn’t ruin some lightbulbs!! The evening “without power” was the perfect wind-down to remember the day and make sure the “how to update” to-do list will be accomplised by our goal of September 30th.

  • Ashley

    I think many of us realized we weren’t as “set” as we thought. One big surprise for us was coming home knowing there was no power, but kept using flashlight to turn on switches, then quickly turned them off again. Really surprised we didn’t ruin some lightbulbs!! The evening “without power” was the perfect wind-down to remember the day and make sure the “how to update” to-do list will be accomplised by our goal of September 30th.

  • that was harder than i though.

  • Anonymous

    This was totally Awesome. We now have are kit ready again. Thanks

  • that was harder than i though.

  • paula5489

    This was totally Awesome. We now have are kit ready again. Thanks

  • HJ

    Was pleasantly surprised how well this went. With family totally on-board we smoked this! 12yo dd was amazing in helping to get out of the house. She even managed to load the 3 gallon jug of water into the car by herself!

    Emailed the challenge to hubby before shutting down the power in the house (not including the breaker for the fridge and freezer of course). We all met easily at our remote location, after he was done working, even without any phone calls between us all day. I took everything we I would have saved in a real emergency (external hard drive/keepsakes/etc.) so I could see if/how it all fit in the car.

    When we came home hubby shut off the water to the house because in a real flood municipal water gets contaminated but all the water in your hot water tank is still drinkable as long (as you take it from the spout of the tank so no new water runs into it).

    Ate from our 72 hour kits easily. In fact dd and I ate only what we needed to get by during the day and was shocked at how little that was. Very proud of her. Cooked over BBQ but had lots of options for cooking so no issue there. Played games in the evening by firelight and was pleasantly surprised when neither hubby nor child asked to use their computers at all! Fantastic experience for us thanks to all the assistance this site has given us in preparing. Jodi and Julie, you have inspired many “what if” conversations for us around the dinner table over the last year or so. πŸ™‚

    On the downside, I forgot all our important papers, husband’s runners and sunscreen. Our little dog couldn’t figure out why he wasn’t allowed in the house all day so will bring him something to lay on next time.

    Ran into a number of improvements we can make such as picking a second meeting place in case the first one is not an option (flooded, etc.). Lots of fine-tuning to do and looking forward to it.

    Thanks ladies! What a fantastic learning experience!

  • HJ

    Was pleasantly surprised how well this went. With family totally on-board we smoked this! 12yo dd was amazing in helping to get out of the house. She even managed to load the 3 gallon jug of water into the car by herself!

    Emailed the challenge to hubby before shutting down the power in the house (not including the breaker for the fridge and freezer of course). We all met easily at our remote location, after he was done working, even without any phone calls between us all day. I took everything we I would have saved in a real emergency (external hard drive/keepsakes/etc.) so I could see if/how it all fit in the car.

    When we came home hubby shut off the water to the house because in a real flood municipal water gets contaminated but all the water in your hot water tank is still drinkable as long (as you take it from the spout of the tank so no new water runs into it).

    Ate from our 72 hour kits easily. In fact dd and I ate only what we needed to get by during the day and was shocked at how little that was. Very proud of her. Cooked over BBQ but had lots of options for cooking so no issue there. Played games in the evening by firelight and was pleasantly surprised when neither hubby nor child asked to use their computers at all! Fantastic experience for us thanks to all the assistance this site has given us in preparing. Jodi and Julie, you have inspired many “what if” conversations for us around the dinner table over the last year or so. πŸ™‚

    On the downside, I forgot all our important papers, husband's runners and sunscreen. Our little dog couldn't figure out why he wasn't allowed in the house all day so will bring him something to lay on next time.

    Ran into a number of improvements we can make such as picking a second meeting place in case the first one is not an option (flooded, etc.). Lots of fine-tuning to do and looking forward to it.

    Thanks ladies! What a fantastic learning experience!

  • Brenda

    Because I work and live alone I wasn’t able to physically participate. However, I have spent a lot of time going over things in my head. My 72-hour kit is pretty complete. A grab list would be wonderful – it’s hard to think clearly when in an emergency. I definitely need to move more of my supplies upstairs. Everything but my 72-hour pack was in the basement. I’m going to clean out top shelves in all of my closets for toilet paper, and other supplies that can’t get wet. I have plenty of water, but again, most of it is in the basement. I need to re-think my storage. Thanks so much for the excellent help!!!

  • Jeanna

    The biggest challenge I think I am facing right now is Water! Let’s face it…that is the most important thing we must have but to store it and transport it is what is causing the most problems! Water is heavy. Either you have large containers that cannot be easily carried or transported OR you have lots of smaller containers that take lots of time to load and take lots of space. Anyone have any good ideas on this? If I can stay home during an emergency, then all is well…it’s the evacuation thing that threw our world into turmoil! The bad part is this…where we live we are not in a flood zone, we face three other possible emergencies (that I know of): 1. Tornadoes (possible evacuation) 2. Ice Storms/Winter Weather (stay home with no power) & 3. Terrorist Activity (unknown, we live near the midst of 2 military bases). The water is my main concern. Any ideas out there?

    • kathy fletcher

      I just had an idea. What about those backpack water packs hikers and mt bikers use? I just bought one for our freshman college student because she is taking a mountain bike course. You could have one for each member of the family stored with the water containers. Then in an emergency, fill each one up real quick. Then each person carries their own on their back. They sell them at walmart and come in different sizes. They would at least hold enough water for a day or maybe two.
      kathy

  • Anonymous

    I think I need to pack a diaper bag to keep in my laundry room. I didn’t leave my home, but it would have been difficult to get my little ones packed in the car. I have my 72 hour kit with diapers and baby needs, but I wouldn’t want to go through my kit to find specific things for the babies. If I could mix up a bottle and get them in the car, I would have more time to grab the rest of my kit. I think a small kit for the older kids too. Coloring books, snacks and drink. My plan would be to get all kids buckled in the car with their snacks while I packed the car.

    Our meeting place was a near by church building, but I think we should have one between my husbands work and the house. I had to consider how long I would wait at each meeting place. We have one within a couple miles of our home and one that would take an hour to get to. If everyone was trying to get out of town, I’m sure much longer than an hour.

    I think what I learned the most is having grab bags available and my grab list. I’m off to pack up some vitamins I could grab and take with me in the case of an emergency!

  • Anonymous

    As we discussed the flood scenario, we concluded that our actual location is not going to be a high risk flood zone since we are over 200 ft above the nearest source of water (not including a break in the water line or something, but that would just be our house or the block, not an evacuation situation. So, in “real life”, we would want to “stay home” and lend a hand sandbagging and helping at the shelters or something.

    I did realize that the point was to test our 72 hour kits and we did learn a few things from the exercise.

    A couple things to think about if you do have a basement, First, our basement is finished and is a walkout basement in the back, but the front is flush with the main level. So, we discussed the circumstance where there might be water in the basement and what if the power was on? Or worse, came on while you were down there trudging through the water checking things out? Bye bye, friend. So, before you start trudging through your basement full of water, it is important to turn off the main electricity — preferably BEFORE the basement floods. Oh, all the dangers that can happen, not just during, but in the aftermath of these disasters.

    Thanks for the drill. We enjoyed thinking about the flooding type situations that could occur in our area and finding higher roads that would get us out safely. And, of course, we’re going to beef up those 72 hour kits so they are up-to-date! In fact, I was thinking those rolling backpacks are pretty cool…. Maybe I’ll upgrade to one of those… πŸ˜‰

  • Jocelyn Robertson

    This was fun – can’t wait to see what tomorrow brings.

  • Kim

    In some ways, this was easy. I have a “local” bug out location in a nearby town and my son’s school is in a different town. So grabbed bags and firesafe and headed out door. Ok, bags weren’t packed so had to grab things quickly, but even without a written list I did decent. Problem with clothing was I grabbed for summer. I need to remember to grab for all weather conditions, or to check and change clothing in bags in the spring/fall. More worried at the though of how my car would handle flooding. It sits very low to the ground.

  • Anonymous

    I am a caregiver for my mom and aunt i have to kids and a grandson. I had my 72 hour not pack so with this hectic life i have i thought no time than the present to get them taken care of i use luggage bags on wheels so if need be my elderlies could manage pulling and still have some control.
    one thing don’t forget your medication if you are on any thing

  • Today I realized that I have a long way to go to be prepared. My husband and I are newleyweds and just moved to California. We started to stock up on food storage last February with Macey’s case lot sale. We thought this would be a fun way to see how prepared we were. After today’s trial period I realized that there are a lot of things to think about. My husband and I live in an area where there are many fires and last year tons of homes had to be evacuated (including my brother-in-law’s family). We also live near a major fault line which is due for a major earthquake. My husband and I realized that we really do need to prepare for any emergency. We thought it would be cool to have a bag labeled for each kind of disaster native to this area so that we can be prepared for anything. Thank goodness we didn’t have kids. I would have been a wreck trying to entertain them today. As for me…I spent most of the day at the library until my husband came home from work.

  • Anonymous

    What a learning experience! Found out that we are lacking a lot of things in order to leave our home. Extra medicine in the grab bag for our daughter. Extra clothes. Having enough water. We kept adding to our list throughout the day of nessesary supplies and things we thought about. Cooking dinner was interesting. I thought I will just cook some potatoes on the grill and top ramen in a pot on our Volcano stove. Ramen went well, potatoes took forever and used up to fuel . Heated up pork n beans in the can over the Volcano stove,cracked the lid to releave the pressure then they started to boil and blew sauce all over the patio. My wife was laughing the whole time. I guess I am not ready for wilderness survival yet. Found out that our youngest kids are facinated with the candles we planned on using, so we resorted to our flashlights and lantern for lighting. It’s amazing how early you get tired with no lighting in the home other than what we used. Looking forward to tomorrow and all the new things we learn and experience.

  • Jocelyn Robertson

    What is a 5 day cooler? I've never heard of this.

  • Cheryl Moore

    We were all sick so I did not read my email till after noon. My 72 hour bags were packed and right by the front door. I could have left in less than 5 mins if I had been able to find my purse! We have talked about several meeting places and had never settled on one. Oops, no one knew where to go! I don’t have all my important papers together so another oops. And since everyone was sick I had not thought about blankets and pillows. I have been reminded about a grab and go list but again I hadn’t done it. Oops, oops and more oops!

  • Brenda

    Because I work and live alone I wasn't able to physically participate. However, I have spent a lot of time going over things in my head. My 72-hour kit is pretty complete. A grab list would be wonderful – it's hard to think clearly when in an emergency. I definitely need to move more of my supplies upstairs. Everything but my 72-hour pack was in the basement. I'm going to clean out top shelves in all of my closets for toilet paper, and other supplies that can't get wet. I have plenty of water, but again, most of it is in the basement. I need to re-think my storage. Thanks so much for the excellent help!!!

  • Anonymous

    WE weren’t able to participate because of a surgery I had this morning, but we did take the time to discuss the drill and see what changes we need to make and what I still need to purchase for my storage. We added to our “Take with you list” cell phones and chargers, external computer backup, lap tops, the jars of $$ that we have to add to the $$ that is in our important document binder and to have a ice chest on hand to empty the refrigerator. These are things that could be done in a very short time when evacuating. Even thouugh we couldn’t participate we felt like we still learned and gained from the drill. We took great notes as to what we need to do to improve. Thanks, looking forward to tommorows surprise.

  • Anonymous

    I am new at this but I do have my 72-hour kit together. All but the wing stove. So cold Beenie Weenies not real yummy. We did very good regarding having clothes and first aid kit. This did make me think about how water proof my food item might not be. I need to think of more intertainment for in the dark. Also how to transport all of my pictures maybe down load them? That would be a chore. The pictures taken the last 5 years or so are on CD and orginized in an Album.

  • Jeanna

    The biggest challenge I think I am facing right now is Water! Let's face it…that is the most important thing we must have but to store it and transport it is what is causing the most problems! Water is heavy. Either you have large containers that cannot be easily carried or transported OR you have lots of smaller containers that take lots of time to load and take lots of space. Anyone have any good ideas on this? If I can stay home during an emergency, then all is well…it's the evacuation thing that threw our world into turmoil! The bad part is this…where we live we are not in a flood zone, we face three other possible emergencies (that I know of): 1. Tornadoes (possible evacuation) 2. Ice Storms/Winter Weather (stay home with no power) & 3. Terrorist Activity (unknown, we live near the midst of 2 military bases). The water is my main concern. Any ideas out there?

  • Anonymous

    I have to admit we did not leave the house today. 102+ heat and a 3 month old. But I thought about what I would have done and boy am I not prepared. I had just taken all of the food out of our 72 hr kits to rotate and was planning on buying food on friday for it and so we had a few snacks, that was not enough. I usually rotate food, clothes, bateries, etc. every Arpil and October(while I watch conference). But last April I was very sick with pregnancy and didn’t change out anything. I also realized I didn’t have anything for my little baby! This is such a great thing you ladies are doing to help us better prepare for anything that may be thrown our way. Hopefully I will be better prepared!!!

  • linzjen

    I think I need to pack a diaper bag to keep in my laundry room. I didn't leave my home, but it would have been difficult to get my little ones packed in the car. I have my 72 hour kit with diapers and baby needs, but I wouldn't want to go through my kit to find specific things for the babies. If I could mix up a bottle and get them in the car, I would have more time to grab the rest of my kit. I think a small kit for the older kids too. Coloring books, snacks and drink. My plan would be to get all kids buckled in the car with their snacks while I packed the car.

    Our meeting place was a near by church building, but I think we should have one between my husbands work and the house. I had to consider how long I would wait at each meeting place. We have one within a couple miles of our home and one that would take an hour to get to. If everyone was trying to get out of town, I'm sure much longer than an hour.

    I think what I learned the most is having grab bags available and my grab list. I'm off to pack up some vitamins I could grab and take with me in the case of an emergency!

  • Anonymous

    What a day for this to start! LOL I lost. Didn’t check email today until I got back from the grocery store this morning, and had already promised my brother we would get him to the airport so he could head to his new post. Army orders that take all day are not something we could skip for a mock disaster…

  • Jeanna

    Hmmmm….where to start. The first thing I learned today is that a 72 hour kit planned on paper doesn’t do much for a hungry tummy! Need to get that done! My dog, however, has her own Milk Jug filled with her food, which is plenty for 3 days. Unless she has to share with her people….just kidding! My first aid kit would take care of a cut on the toe, but nothing more serious. I did have a case of water bottles in the trunk of the car, not because I was prepared…because I was lazy yesterday and didn’t unload it after grocery shopping. That case will now stay in the trunk of my car. I have a really good start on my Emergency Binder but it needs more work. I have all of our important papers in a fire-proof lock box, but I’m not sure if it’s water-proof. I’m guessing it is because what’s the point in protecting things from a fire if you are going to destroy them with water while trying to put out the fire? That’s on my growing To Do List that I started this morning after reading the email. Gas in the car? Nope, the low fuel light is on (that’s a bad habit I have). Speaking of bad habits…I guess I should either quit smoking or pack cigarettes in my ER Kit. Change of clothes, yes, from last year and only for my daughter. My 7 yo daughter will never fit into her clothes that I packed last year. They are, however, in a waterproof bag. We had absolutely NO entertainment planned. We would have had to rely on the pen in my purse and the Sharpie that was in the car. We are good at playing games that you might play while traveling. For example, I Spy, Alphabet I Spy (start with A and name something you can see that starts with A, then move to B and so on). But, trust me, those games get really old, really quick. I know that I am sorely lacking in the non-food area, but now I know just how bad it is. I’m very thankful for this challenge and have an awesome start on a To Do List that suits my family and makes preparing more real. All the information out there can be overwhelming and makes it easy to sit back and just think about it without actually acting on it! Thanks Jodi & Julie! See you all tomorrow!

  • Melissa Sanchez

    It was such a challenge for me to cook dinner with no power. However, I cooked everything on the BBQ and it was delicious. I definately learned a new skill that I can use over and over again.

  • theresar

    As we discussed the flood scenario, we concluded that our actual location is not going to be a high risk flood zone since we are over 200 ft above the nearest source of water (not including a break in the water line or something, but that would just be our house or the block, not an evacuation situation. So, in “real life”, we would want to “stay home” and lend a hand sandbagging and helping at the shelters or something.

    I did realize that the point was to test our 72 hour kits and we did learn a few things from the exercise.

    A couple things to think about if you do have a basement, First, our basement is finished and is a walkout basement in the back, but the front is flush with the main level. So, we discussed the circumstance where there might be water in the basement and what if the power was on? Or worse, came on while you were down there trudging through the water checking things out? Bye bye, friend. So, before you start trudging through your basement full of water, it is important to turn off the main electricity — preferably BEFORE the basement floods. Oh, all the dangers that can happen, not just during, but in the aftermath of these disasters.

    Thanks for the drill. We enjoyed thinking about the flooding type situations that could occur in our area and finding higher roads that would get us out safely. And, of course, we're going to beef up those 72 hour kits so they are up-to-date! In fact, I was thinking those rolling backpacks are pretty cool…. Maybe I'll upgrade to one of those… πŸ˜‰

  • Anonymous

    This really makes one think about all of the items you might need to be waterproof. A flood could come very quickly and therefore you might not have time to get everything before it gets wet a bit. In so many places floods mean not being able to drive your vehicle and then where to go? This really made me think. One thing that is interesting here – in this city I live in, in Texas there are no houses with basements, due to the water table and possible flooding. It is something I’ve missed, but maybe there are some good reasons for it? Great opportunity to think about a lot of situations.

  • Jocelyn Robertson

    This was fun – can't wait to see what tomorrow brings.

  • Anonymous

    I was unable to leave the house due to the fact that my husband had the car and I have a 22 month old and 2 month old twins, but I was able to think about the things that I still need. We need just about everything! I have to admit that we are not very prepared. I just discovered this Web site about a week ago and I am very impressed! : ) We need to get an emergency binder and grab list ready. We also need to put our 72 hour kit together. The funny thing is that we have just about all the food that goes into the kit, but we haven’t put it in one spot. We have first aid kits and TONS of water which is a good thing. We also have food to make without electricity. I have found that we have a lot of food the problem is that it isn’t organized so I feel unprepared. I just purchased the checklists e-binder and will be putting it together tonight. Thanks for this Web site and the opportunity to plan for the future! Food Storage and Preparedness has always seemed a little bit intimidating to me but I am getting really excited.

  • Anonymous

    I got the “evac” email right after my daughter headed off to work. Hubby leaves at 5am, so after calling my husband & texting my daughter, I headed out to the pop up tent trailer. We keep it fairly stocked with canned foods & water. We figure it only takes a minute to hook it up & go. I had no car to leave, so just me & the 2 dogs spent the day in he trailer. We took lots of walks – keeping 2 Jack Russel dogs in a small space would be like keeping 4 kids in one room. Anyway, hubby & daughter got home at about the same time & I already had supper started on the propane stove. Kept my sanity by listening to a hand crank radio & quilting. Learned that we never put summer clothing in our 72 hr packs, so we fairly roasted in our sweat pants! Will have to remember to change clothing when we update food supplies (every 6 months-same time we change batteries in smoke alarms). Must say, all in all, showed us that we really are mostly ready for anything. Can’t wait for tomorrow!

  • Chris Snyder

    I had not dealt with or planned for a disaster with 30 cows and 5 horses. It is an awakening thought that you have animals that need to be protected. We typically don’t have floods in rural Wyoming but we do have blizzards. Planning is essential. Feed during a blizzard is just as important as negotating a flood.

  • Kim

    In some ways, this was easy. I have a “local” bug out location in a nearby town and my son's school is in a different town. So grabbed bags and firesafe and headed out door. Ok, bags weren't packed so had to grab things quickly, but even without a written list I did decent. Problem with clothing was I grabbed for summer. I need to remember to grab for all weather conditions, or to check and change clothing in bags in the spring/fall. More worried at the though of how my car would handle flooding. It sits very low to the ground.

  • bonnie1967

    I am a caregiver for my mom and aunt i have to kids and a grandson. I had my 72 hour not pack so with this hectic life i have i thought no time than the present to get them taken care of i use luggage bags on wheels so if need be my elderlies could manage pulling and still have some control.
    one thing don't forget your medication if you are on any thing

  • A great Learning and challenging experience.

  • Today I realized that I have a long way to go to be prepared. My husband and I are newleyweds and just moved to California. We started to stock up on food storage last February with Macey's case lot sale. We thought this would be a fun way to see how prepared we were. After today's trial period I realized that there are a lot of things to think about. My husband and I live in an area where there are many fires and last year tons of homes had to be evacuated (including my brother-in-law's family). We also live near a major fault line which is due for a major earthquake. My husband and I realized that we really do need to prepare for any emergency. We thought it would be cool to have a bag labeled for each kind of disaster native to this area so that we can be prepared for anything. Thank goodness we didn't have kids. I would have been a wreck trying to entertain them today. As for me…I spent most of the day at the library until my husband came home from work.

  • bradu

    What a learning experience! Found out that we are lacking a lot of things in order to leave our home. Extra medicine in the grab bag for our daughter. Extra clothes. Having enough water. We kept adding to our list throughout the day of nessesary supplies and things we thought about. Cooking dinner was interesting. I thought I will just cook some potatoes on the grill and top ramen in a pot on our Volcano stove. Ramen went well, potatoes took forever and used up to fuel . Heated up pork n beans in the can over the Volcano stove,cracked the lid to releave the pressure then they started to boil and blew sauce all over the patio. My wife was laughing the whole time. I guess I am not ready for wilderness survival yet. Found out that our youngest kids are facinated with the candles we planned on using, so we resorted to our flashlights and lantern for lighting. It's amazing how early you get tired with no lighting in the home other than what we used. Looking forward to tomorrow and all the new things we learn and experience.

  • Anonymous

    This was harder than I expected even though I went through hurricane Ike less than a year ago. I think that the fact that it rained all day made it hard to hang out outside of the house for four hours with 3 kids 4 and younger while 7 months pregnant. I had everything ready and food worked out but it would have been nice to have more or at least a bigger blanket to hang out on. First aid was great. My biggest problem was having enough things to keep everyone from dying from boredom.

    we met up fine a the meet up spot. Dark was not a problem. I think because i was so unprepared for Ike i did much better than I would have. Just a few more kinks to work out.

    Side note. Needed more water in smaller water bottles.

  • Cheryl Moore

    We were all sick so I did not read my email till after noon. My 72 hour bags were packed and right by the front door. I could have left in less than 5 mins if I had been able to find my purse! We have talked about several meeting places and had never settled on one. Oops, no one knew where to go! I don't have all my important papers together so another oops. And since everyone was sick I had not thought about blankets and pillows. I have been reminded about a grab and go list but again I hadn't done it. Oops, oops and more oops!

  • Anonymous

    Okay…I found that I was not as prepared as I thought. I need clothes for the kids and I also found that I need to make a seperate 72 hour kit that has just baby food in it for my 10 month old. She could have the lipton soup and oatmeal, but that is where it ends. Thanks for helping me prepare!

  • RoxAtkinson

    WE weren't able to participate because of a surgery I had this morning, but we did take the time to discuss the drill and see what changes we need to make and what I still need to purchase for my storage. We added to our “Take with you list” cell phones and chargers, external computer backup, lap tops, the jars of $$ that we have to add to the $$ that is in our important document binder and to have a ice chest on hand to empty the refrigerator. These are things that could be done in a very short time when evacuating. Even thouugh we couldn't participate we felt like we still learned and gained from the drill. We took great notes as to what we need to do to improve. Thanks, looking forward to tommorows surprise.

  • kdmay

    I am new at this but I do have my 72-hour kit together. All but the wing stove. So cold Beenie Weenies not real yummy. We did very good regarding having clothes and first aid kit. This did make me think about how water proof my food item might not be. I need to think of more intertainment for in the dark. Also how to transport all of my pictures maybe down load them? That would be a chore. The pictures taken the last 5 years or so are on CD and orginized in an Album.

  • deanabushman

    I have to admit we did not leave the house today. 102+ heat and a 3 month old. But I thought about what I would have done and boy am I not prepared. I had just taken all of the food out of our 72 hr kits to rotate and was planning on buying food on friday for it and so we had a few snacks, that was not enough. I usually rotate food, clothes, bateries, etc. every Arpil and October(while I watch conference). But last April I was very sick with pregnancy and didn't change out anything. I also realized I didn't have anything for my little baby! This is such a great thing you ladies are doing to help us better prepare for anything that may be thrown our way. Hopefully I will be better prepared!!!

  • deannh03

    What a day for this to start! LOL I lost. Didn't check email today until I got back from the grocery store this morning, and had already promised my brother we would get him to the airport so he could head to his new post. Army orders that take all day are not something we could skip for a mock disaster…

  • Jeanna

    Hmmmm….where to start. The first thing I learned today is that a 72 hour kit planned on paper doesn't do much for a hungry tummy! Need to get that done! My dog, however, has her own Milk Jug filled with her food, which is plenty for 3 days. Unless she has to share with her people….just kidding! My first aid kit would take care of a cut on the toe, but nothing more serious. I did have a case of water bottles in the trunk of the car, not because I was prepared…because I was lazy yesterday and didn't unload it after grocery shopping. That case will now stay in the trunk of my car. I have a really good start on my Emergency Binder but it needs more work. I have all of our important papers in a fire-proof lock box, but I'm not sure if it's water-proof. I'm guessing it is because what's the point in protecting things from a fire if you are going to destroy them with water while trying to put out the fire? That's on my growing To Do List that I started this morning after reading the email. Gas in the car? Nope, the low fuel light is on (that's a bad habit I have). Speaking of bad habits…I guess I should either quit smoking or pack cigarettes in my ER Kit. Change of clothes, yes, from last year and only for my daughter. My 7 yo daughter will never fit into her clothes that I packed last year. They are, however, in a waterproof bag. We had absolutely NO entertainment planned. We would have had to rely on the pen in my purse and the Sharpie that was in the car. We are good at playing games that you might play while traveling. For example, I Spy, Alphabet I Spy (start with A and name something you can see that starts with A, then move to B and so on). But, trust me, those games get really old, really quick. I know that I am sorely lacking in the non-food area, but now I know just how bad it is. I'm very thankful for this challenge and have an awesome start on a To Do List that suits my family and makes preparing more real. All the information out there can be overwhelming and makes it easy to sit back and just think about it without actually acting on it! Thanks Jodi & Julie! See you all tomorrow!

  • Anonymous

    Well I learned a lot today. I was not as prepared as I thought. Did not include cat. Tonight I made his 72 pack & placed it in his cat carrier (still looking for his halter & leash). I got my med despenser made, but had not placed it in my bag. Found my milk in husbands bag when I got home. I need more water to put in my car kit. Need 3 more 1 liter water bottles to put on our kits. My tuna can heaters are not made (one have 1 can saved so far). Thank goodness most of our food is not heated. I included more food because people have a tendacy to nibble more during an emergency. I have 2 large trauma bags which include a OB birth kit & burn blanket. I put small pocket kits in our 72hr packs. Each pack has a pint size ziplock with hygeine products. & plent of handwipes & alcohol hand sanitizer which can be also used in the empty vienne sausage can for heaters.
    5 day coolers work great to keep food from getting wet. They have very good seals & can even float if not to heavy with food. I have 2 stuffed with food.

    • Jocelyn Robertson

      What is a 5 day cooler? I’ve never heard of this.

  • Anonymous

    This is such a wonderful plan! Unfortunately, since I am working at home I couldn’t follow everything, but it definitely made me go through bullet by bullet as to what we needed to have prepared.

  • **For this day, and ALL days of the challenge: no spending money, no going to stores, and no restaurants. **
    OK — except will need to get more gas (I need to drive to work– and Friday is my usual “fill up day”), and will be attending a conference for work– which will include a prepared, “restaurant” type lunch.

    **You have no power for the whole day (except to fill out the questionnaire, or chat on facebook about what you are learning!) **
    OK — except for at work, or course!

    **You have to β€œleave” your house within an hour for at least 5 hours (but you don’t know if your house is going to be there when you get back).**
    Had to “start” this after coming back from school– so I guess I could at least think about what I’d need and where it was before I actually started. Usually there is a similar amount of “pre-warning” for disasters like these– at least there was for the two wildfires in our area, and most weather related disasters can be predicted.
    Came home much earlier than planned– the dog beach had an uncontrolled rowdy dog there, and it didn’t make sense to just drive around wasting gas.

    **You can only grab what is in your disasters kit and ALREADY on your grab list when you leave. *remember your house may be destroyed when you get back **
    Had “emergency stuff” bag already packed, re-backed up computer to external hard drive while I put “stuff”, dog food/dishes, water jugs and small lunch cooler in car. 1st Aid/Emergency food & water already there.

    **You have to eat the food from your 72 hour kit while you are gone **
    Ate the fresh food in the cooler instead– actually, didn’t finish that. There’s enough for at least one more meal. Dogs had at least a weeks’ worth of dry food in the bag I brought, and they could “share” some of the fresh food I brought if it seemed likely it would spoil before I could eat it.

    **Your family gets soaking wet during evacuation, and one of your family members cuts their toe open **
    Well, #2 dog DID get wet, not totally soaked, but enough that I had to rinse her off, and dry her before letting her back in the car. I got soaked to the knees, and splashed, but just left the wet clothes on. Rather pleasant getting wet, actually…. #1 dog was bowled over by an uncontrolled dog, and limped for a while, but doesn’t seem to be hurt. There are Band-aides, gauze pads and medical tape, Mycetracin ointment, Steri-strips and a suture kit in the 1st Aid can– but definitely would need help holding down the dogs if they needed stitching. Need to get some Coban/”vet tape”.

    **Your spouse is at work. You have to meet at your pre-determined meeting location when he or she is done work **
    Spouse is out of town. For 2 weeks– so I’ll see him then, at the airport.

    **Once your whole family reunites you can return to your house. **
    Exercise 5h period is over before kids (and hubby) are due home. I’ll be in bed by the time my kids get home.

    **When you get home, your fridge food is ruined, your basement food is flooded, and you need to make dinner with no power **
    No basements here! Dinner was in the solar oven before the “evacuation notice”… and there are oranges and apples still on the trees if anybody wants dessert….

    **Keep your family entertained with no power (remember, after dark the lights, tv, appliances etc wont work!) **
    #2 son has a PSP; both kids have laptops with Wi-fi connections and the “big batteries” (they can go several hours without being “tied to a wall”). I can crochet to the light of the solar glow globes in the garden– I’ve done it! Also have battery-type lanterns and candles if needed. The weather is still warm enough that it is pleasant to sit outside in the evenings, and there are blankets in storage in the shed if those are needed (plus the “72 hr buckets” with those metalized blankets, and extra clothes). Still have the “dog blankets” in the car, too.

  • Melissa Sanchez

    It was such a challenge for me to cook dinner with no power. However, I cooked everything on the BBQ and it was delicious. I definately learned a new skill that I can use over and over again.

  • mel6

    This really makes one think about all of the items you might need to be waterproof. A flood could come very quickly and therefore you might not have time to get everything before it gets wet a bit. In so many places floods mean not being able to drive your vehicle and then where to go? This really made me think. One thing that is interesting here – in this city I live in, in Texas there are no houses with basements, due to the water table and possible flooding. It is something I've missed, but maybe there are some good reasons for it? Great opportunity to think about a lot of situations.

  • annadenney

    I was unable to leave the house due to the fact that my husband had the car and I have a 22 month old and 2 month old twins, but I was able to think about the things that I still need. We need just about everything! I have to admit that we are not very prepared. I just discovered this Web site about a week ago and I am very impressed! : ) We need to get an emergency binder and grab list ready. We also need to put our 72 hour kit together. The funny thing is that we have just about all the food that goes into the kit, but we haven't put it in one spot. We have first aid kits and TONS of water which is a good thing. We also have food to make without electricity. I have found that we have a lot of food the problem is that it isn't organized so I feel unprepared. I just purchased the checklists e-binder and will be putting it together tonight. Thanks for this Web site and the opportunity to plan for the future! Food Storage and Preparedness has always seemed a little bit intimidating to me but I am getting really excited.

  • kathybeachy

    I got the “evac” email right after my daughter headed off to work. Hubby leaves at 5am, so after calling my husband & texting my daughter, I headed out to the pop up tent trailer. We keep it fairly stocked with canned foods & water. We figure it only takes a minute to hook it up & go. I had no car to leave, so just me & the 2 dogs spent the day in he trailer. We took lots of walks – keeping 2 Jack Russel dogs in a small space would be like keeping 4 kids in one room. Anyway, hubby & daughter got home at about the same time & I already had supper started on the propane stove. Kept my sanity by listening to a hand crank radio & quilting. Learned that we never put summer clothing in our 72 hr packs, so we fairly roasted in our sweat pants! Will have to remember to change clothing when we update food supplies (every 6 months-same time we change batteries in smoke alarms). Must say, all in all, showed us that we really are mostly ready for anything. Can't wait for tomorrow!

  • have to add a little humor here husband threw a box of midol in our bug out bag saying it was a matter of survival to him, lol. We did pretty well . Think I will get a kerosene stove it would be a lot better to cook on and we already have a lot of kerosene lamps. I failed on the issue of having my important papers in one place and protected by fire and water.Have to get that done.Tupperware boxes would be great but expensive I am wondering if putting boxes of mac and cheese and stuff like that in zip lock bags would protect it from flood waters. I also have read onlike to dip boxes in wax as well as cans for long term storage what do you think of that?

  • Even though I didn’t actually participate in the challenge, I decided to get out my manual can opener when making dinner tonight, just in the spirit of things. I had gotten it from my Dad when he got remarried, and pulled it out of the garage for the first time. I had always known in the back of my mind that I had it, and didn’t think twice about it. Unfortunately, it didn’t even work! I’m glad it hadn’t been a real disaster. Now imagine what else I might have learned if I actually had participated!

  • Chris Snyder

    I had not dealt with or planned for a disaster with 30 cows and 5 horses. It is an awakening thought that you have animals that need to be protected. We typically don't have floods in rural Wyoming but we do have blizzards. Planning is essential. Feed during a blizzard is just as important as negotating a flood.

  • Anonymous

    Found out we did not have the necessary medicine for our kids, learned that some of us really did not like a lot of the food in our 72 hour kits. Also, it has become a discipline issue with our little ones about not eating all the food at once. Another discipline issue is safety over candles and our cookstove with a 3 and 4 year old and trying to keep them safe, since we usually do not use these items. What an eye opener!

  • A great Learning and challenging experience.

  • keating737

    This was harder than I expected even though I went through hurricane Ike less than a year ago. I think that the fact that it rained all day made it hard to hang out outside of the house for four hours with 3 kids 4 and younger while 7 months pregnant. I had everything ready and food worked out but it would have been nice to have more or at least a bigger blanket to hang out on. First aid was great. My biggest problem was having enough things to keep everyone from dying from boredom.

    we met up fine a the meet up spot. Dark was not a problem. I think because i was so unprepared for Ike i did much better than I would have. Just a few more kinks to work out.

    Side note. Needed more water in smaller water bottles.

  • kimsanderson

    Okay…I found that I was not as prepared as I thought. I need clothes for the kids and I also found that I need to make a seperate 72 hour kit that has just baby food in it for my 10 month old. She could have the lipton soup and oatmeal, but that is where it ends. Thanks for helping me prepare!

  • I need to buy a Llama cart. The Llamas didn’t want to ride in the car with the 2 cats and grandchildren. I didn’t have 72 hour kits packed up but manager to grab enough stuff to leave, lucky as a nurse I did have an extensive 1st aid kit. All important papers are easily grabbed in a fireproof box. A can opener would of been nice though. I always have a deck of cards in my purse. We do need to do alot more preps though. I never thought about having to evac the llamas that fast.
    πŸ™

    • Llamas as in the big kind that sort of look like camels and spit?

  • LGCS

    Well I learned a lot today. I was not as prepared as I thought. Did not include cat. Tonight I made his 72 pack & placed it in his cat carrier (still looking for his halter & leash). I got my med despenser made, but had not placed it in my bag. Found my milk in husbands bag when I got home. I need more water to put in my car kit. Need 3 more 1 liter water bottles to put on our kits. My tuna can heaters are not made (one have 1 can saved so far). Thank goodness most of our food is not heated. I included more food because people have a tendacy to nibble more during an emergency. I have 2 large trauma bags which include a OB birth kit & burn blanket. I put small pocket kits in our 72hr packs. Each pack has a pint size ziplock with hygeine products. & plent of handwipes & alcohol hand sanitizer which can be also used in the empty vienne sausage can for heaters.
    5 day coolers work great to keep food from getting wet. They have very good seals & can even float if not to heavy with food. I have 2 stuffed with food.

  • beckytfisher

    This is such a wonderful plan! Unfortunately, since I am working at home I couldn't follow everything, but it definitely made me go through bullet by bullet as to what we needed to have prepared.

  • **For this day, and ALL days of the challenge: no spending money, no going to stores, and no restaurants. **
    OK — except will need to get more gas (I need to drive to work– and Friday is my usual “fill up day”), and will be attending a conference for work– which will include a prepared, “restaurant” type lunch.

    **You have no power for the whole day (except to fill out the questionnaire, or chat on facebook about what you are learning!) **
    OK — except for at work, or course!

    **You have to β€œleave” your house within an hour for at least 5 hours (but you don’t know if your house is going to be there when you get back).**
    Had to “start” this after coming back from school– so I guess I could at least think about what I'd need and where it was before I actually started. Usually there is a similar amount of “pre-warning” for disasters like these– at least there was for the two wildfires in our area, and most weather related disasters can be predicted.
    Came home much earlier than planned– the dog beach had an uncontrolled rowdy dog there, and it didn't make sense to just drive around wasting gas.

    **You can only grab what is in your disasters kit and ALREADY on your grab list when you leave. *remember your house may be destroyed when you get back **
    Had “emergency stuff” bag already packed, re-backed up computer to external hard drive while I put “stuff”, dog food/dishes, water jugs and small lunch cooler in car. 1st Aid/Emergency food & water already there.

    **You have to eat the food from your 72 hour kit while you are gone **
    Ate the fresh food in the cooler instead– actually, didn't finish that. There's enough for at least one more meal. Dogs had at least a weeks' worth of dry food in the bag I brought, and they could “share” some of the fresh food I brought if it seemed likely it would spoil before I could eat it.

    **Your family gets soaking wet during evacuation, and one of your family members cuts their toe open **
    Well, #2 dog DID get wet, not totally soaked, but enough that I had to rinse her off, and dry her before letting her back in the car. I got soaked to the knees, and splashed, but just left the wet clothes on. Rather pleasant getting wet, actually…. #1 dog was bowled over by an uncontrolled dog, and limped for a while, but doesn't seem to be hurt. There are Band-aides, gauze pads and medical tape, Mycetracin ointment, Steri-strips and a suture kit in the 1st Aid can– but definitely would need help holding down the dogs if they needed stitching. Need to get some Coban/”vet tape”.

    **Your spouse is at work. You have to meet at your pre-determined meeting location when he or she is done work **
    Spouse is out of town. For 2 weeks– so I'll see him then, at the airport.

    **Once your whole family reunites you can return to your house. **
    Exercise 5h period is over before kids (and hubby) are due home. I'll be in bed by the time my kids get home.

    **When you get home, your fridge food is ruined, your basement food is flooded, and you need to make dinner with no power **
    No basements here! Dinner was in the solar oven before the “evacuation notice”… and there are oranges and apples still on the trees if anybody wants dessert….

    **Keep your family entertained with no power (remember, after dark the lights, tv, appliances etc wont work!) **
    #2 son has a PSP; both kids have laptops with Wi-fi connections and the “big batteries” (they can go several hours without being “tied to a wall”). I can crochet to the light of the solar glow globes in the garden– I've done it! Also have battery-type lanterns and candles if needed. The weather is still warm enough that it is pleasant to sit outside in the evenings, and there are blankets in storage in the shed if those are needed (plus the “72 hr buckets” with those metalized blankets, and extra clothes). Still have the “dog blankets” in the car, too.

  • Michelle

    I got lucky a few months ago and they were giving away a five pound bag of dog food where I buy my dog's goodies, I took them up on their gift and immediately deemed that “Camille's food storage!” I take her on weekly hikes in the mountains, so I always have collapsable dishes for her with me and keep a spare leash in the truck as well. Since it is just me and her, I think I have it a bit simpler than folks with human children, but she does have meds that she needs daily, and marshmallows to make the meds go down. I had her meds, but had not packed any marshmallows in our kit! Go figure πŸ™‚

  • Hold direct pressure for 10-15 mins, as you elevate it. Make a pressure dressing and don't let them walk on it. If you don't know how to do this, take a first aid class or get with a boy scout, etc. FYI, a sanitary pad makes a GREAT dressing (clean and absorbent), and you can hold it in place with that tapeless dressing material. It is called coban if you buy it at a drug store, but you can get it at IFA, etc as it is used to wrap horses' ankles, etc. It is much cheaper at IFA-type stores (and better colors, too).

  • Anonymous

    I forgot to include items for our newly adopted kitten! I realize now that I need to keep up with my kits and not just make them and forget them! Thanks Jodi and Julie! You are really helping me!!!! If this had been for real, my poor little kitten might not make it! Oh, how horrible that would be!

  • Anonymous

    Our family got up and did our regular morning routine and left for work before I seen the e-mail. But I work very near our home I went home for lunch and grabbed our 72 hour kits and immediately left again and have only eaten out of that. I always thought even though it was a 72 hour kit it would never make that long. I actually think now, if necessary it would work well, although a bowl or spoon, etc. would be really handy to go with it. I have what I need but it’s not really in one spot. I could’ve got it together in a very short amount of time, but it still would be a good ideal to bring it all together a little more.

  • Anonymous

    I realized that I have some major holes in my preps. I am making a list of all the things that I have put off. I realized that I have not made any preps for our pets! I also need to store extra medicines to keep on hand.

  • Jeanna

    Our dog, a Boston Terrier, has her own 72 hour Milk Jug filled with her food. She's a small dog and doesn't eat alot, especially when nervous, so a milk jug full of her food will be plenty for 72 hours. πŸ™‚

  • I need more water for my two dogs. I forgot that any trip out of the house constitutes excitement which induces panting which makes them drink like crazy. I’m going to add a gallon beside the go box. They are both small dogs, but mercy can they drink. And it was only 70 degrees today…

  • have to add a little humor here husband threw a box of midol in our bug out bag saying it was a matter of survival to him, lol. We did pretty well . Think I will get a kerosene stove it would be a lot better to cook on and we already have a lot of kerosene lamps. I failed on the issue of having my important papers in one place and protected by fire and water.Have to get that done.Tupperware boxes would be great but expensive I am wondering if putting boxes of mac and cheese and stuff like that in zip lock bags would protect it from flood waters. I also have read onlike to dip boxes in wax as well as cans for long term storage what do you think of that?

  • Llamas as in the big kind that sort of look like camels and spit?

  • Even though I didn't actually participate in the challenge, I decided to get out my manual can opener when making dinner tonight, just in the spirit of things. I had gotten it from my Dad when he got remarried, and pulled it out of the garage for the first time. I had always known in the back of my mind that I had it, and didn't think twice about it. Unfortunately, it didn't even work! I'm glad it hadn't been a real disaster. Now imagine what else I might have learned if I actually had participated!

  • Anonymous

    It is amazing on how much you really are not prepared when something does come up. We have the basics if we needed to stay here in our home. The having to leave your home is the hard part. We are new to this area and have not learned enough about where to go yet. It is a good eye opener to what needs to be done. The kids are thinking about this a little more serious now that they didn’t do so well on the first day.

  • amberunfred

    Found out we did not have the necessary medicine for our kids, learned that some of us really did not like a lot of the food in our 72 hour kits. Also, it has become a discipline issue with our little ones about not eating all the food at once. Another discipline issue is safety over candles and our cookstove with a 3 and 4 year old and trying to keep them safe, since we usually do not use these items. What an eye opener!

  • I need to buy a Llama cart. The Llamas didn't want to ride in the car with the 2 cats and grandchildren. I didn't have 72 hour kits packed up but manager to grab enough stuff to leave, lucky as a nurse I did have an extensive 1st aid kit. All important papers are easily grabbed in a fireproof box. A can opener would of been nice though. I always have a deck of cards in my purse. We do need to do alot more preps though. I never thought about having to evac the llamas that fast.
    πŸ™

  • Anonymous

    My husband is not particapating. He thinks I have enuff food storage and emergency supplies. I have approx 8 months put back, a little more in some things. But he is the one who makes sure we have all the gas we need. That all the equipement is working well. I does the heavy work for the garden. He does the hunting. The care of the orchard. I think he is particapting in emergency preparedness without relising it.

  • I was already at work when I got the word. Flooding does happen in the Northwest, though we are at the top of a hill that would not flood, we deal with it in the area annually. I had shamefully not thought of dog food for the dog, and we would meet at the church “if I could get over the river”. The 72 hour kit needs a little refreshing as we head into winter, as I am on the road early and late. Crossing a river both ways need to be prepared to deal with not getting home. Delighted we are doing this

  • barbarapak

    I forgot to include items for our newly adopted kitten! I realize now that I need to keep up with my kits and not just make them and forget them! Thanks Jodi and Julie! You are really helping me!!!! If this had been for real, my poor little kitten might not make it! Oh, how horrible that would be!

  • rferguson

    Our family got up and did our regular morning routine and left for work before I seen the e-mail. But I work very near our home I went home for lunch and grabbed our 72 hour kits and immediately left again and have only eaten out of that. I always thought even though it was a 72 hour kit it would never make that long. I actually think now, if necessary it would work well, although a bowl or spoon, etc. would be really handy to go with it. I have what I need but it's not really in one spot. I could've got it together in a very short amount of time, but it still would be a good ideal to bring it all together a little more.

  • mithreesons

    I realized that I have some major holes in my preps. I am making a list of all the things that I have put off. I realized that I have not made any preps for our pets! I also need to store extra medicines to keep on hand.

  • I need more water for my two dogs. I forgot that any trip out of the house constitutes excitement which induces panting which makes them drink like crazy. I'm going to add a gallon beside the go box. They are both small dogs, but mercy can they drink. And it was only 70 degrees today…

  • krazedma

    It is amazing on how much you really are not prepared when something does come up. We have the basics if we needed to stay here in our home. The having to leave your home is the hard part. We are new to this area and have not learned enough about where to go yet. It is a good eye opener to what needs to be done. The kids are thinking about this a little more serious now that they didn't do so well on the first day.

  • Anonymous

    This is so amazing. I cannot believe the things that I do not have ready. I am so grateful that you are doing this challenge to get me thinking and replanning. I did locate some of the things you talked about having…and I’m talking with my family about the place we are to meet. I definately did not have dog food ready to go.

    • Jeanna

      Our dog, a Boston Terrier, has her own 72 hour Milk Jug filled with her food. She’s a small dog and doesn’t eat alot, especially when nervous, so a milk jug full of her food will be plenty for 72 hours. πŸ™‚

      • Michelle

        I got lucky a few months ago and they were giving away a five pound bag of dog food where I buy my dog’s goodies, I took them up on their gift and immediately deemed that “Camille’s food storage!” I take her on weekly hikes in the mountains, so I always have collapsable dishes for her with me and keep a spare leash in the truck as well. Since it is just me and her, I think I have it a bit simpler than folks with human children, but she does have meds that she needs daily, and marshmallows to make the meds go down. I had her meds, but had not packed any marshmallows in our kit! Go figure πŸ™‚

  • Anonymous

    Luckily today isn’t too hot so going without the AC shouldn’t be too bad. My dogs might get warm though. I wasn’t prepared for my 2 month old. And, I didn’t make arrangements for our 2 dogs! This is a great way to get prepared for the next “disaster”

  • LGCS

    My husband is not particapating. He thinks I have enuff food storage and emergency supplies. I have approx 8 months put back, a little more in some things. But he is the one who makes sure we have all the gas we need. That all the equipement is working well. I does the heavy work for the garden. He does the hunting. The care of the orchard. I think he is particapting in emergency preparedness without relising it.

  • I was already at work when I got the word. Flooding does happen in the Northwest, though we are at the top of a hill that would not flood, we deal with it in the area annually. I had shamefully not thought of dog food for the dog, and we would meet at the church “if I could get over the river”. The 72 hour kit needs a little refreshing as we head into winter, as I am on the road early and late. Crossing a river both ways need to be prepared to deal with not getting home. Delighted we are doing this

  • debbiecole

    This is so amazing. I cannot believe the things that I do not have ready. I am so grateful that you are doing this challenge to get me thinking and replanning. I did locate some of the things you talked about having…and I'm talking with my family about the place we are to meet. I definately did not have dog food ready to go.

  • tiffanygreen

    Luckily today isn't too hot so going without the AC shouldn't be too bad. My dogs might get warm though. I wasn't prepared for my 2 month old. And, I didn't make arrangements for our 2 dogs! This is a great way to get prepared for the next “disaster”

  • Anonymous

    I live in the country. We only have a little over 1,000 people in our township. Our meeting place is my work, about 30 minutes away. Where I work is also a disaster shelter for vets in hosp to the south. Also disaster shelter of last resort if the rest of the state is full. We usually get a lot of people from down south during a hurricane. Our parish population doubles or has even tripled during a disaster. Gas & food are the first to disappear. We keep approx 50 gal of gas for the generators, lawn tractors, chain saws, & so I can get to work.

  • Anonymous

    If the whole city flooded we would be meeting in the next town, 45 min away, we are modifing it for our family, to our neighborhood flooded. Hope this doesn’t count as cheating. This is so much fun, my kids are loving it!!! Thanks for all you guys have done!!!

  • I’m really interested to see how those people who were trying to do this without cars did it. If the whole city is being evacuated, how in the world are you going to get out?

  • Anonymous

    Got the E-mail about 0640 this morning & was out of the house by 0650. (I had to go to work). Could not find my powdered milk in my 72hr kit, so I could not have my instant breakfast. Had to settled for a snack bar & glass of crystal light. Lucky I took my medication before this started. I had not put my 2nd weekly pill box in my backpack. It’s sitting on by bathroom counter all filled up. Only have 2.75 gal water, but also have 1 gal of soda in my car pack. I do have 2 changes of clothes & 1 work uniform sealed in ziplock bags along with 3 sets of underthings. I think having a car pack along with a 72hrs pack in a big help. Much more food to choose from. For my car pack I used a #10can with plastic lid packed with items that will last even in 100 degree weather like we have in Louisiana. Oh no forgot the insect Repellent.

  • Anonymous

    We needed to know if we could take the car when we left the house. We have had drills in our ward where cars were not to be used and some where you could use the car. Big dif

  • Great all is well so far. I have a generator to power my sump pump so I can pump the water out of my basement! I can take 1 dog with me, no room for 2 (they are big) my chickens will have to stay though. Hopefully they will make it. This is a great learning experience!

  • LGCS

    I live in the country. We only have a little over 1,000 people in our township. Our meeting place is my work, about 30 minutes away. Where I work is also a disaster shelter for vets in hosp to the south. Also disaster shelter of last resort if the rest of the state is full. We usually get a lot of people from down south during a hurricane. Our parish population doubles or has even tripled during a disaster. Gas & food are the first to disappear. We keep approx 50 gal of gas for the generators, lawn tractors, chain saws, & so I can get to work.

  • Can you please let us know if pets were evacuated as well? I assume so for a flood, however I live on the tip-top of a mountain (if we flood, we’re all in trouble) so I’m not positive here. I presume we’re taking our critters?

    • YES! We should have clarified. You would definitely want to bring your
      pets. If you want to see how that would really work out, then try it
      today. If you “cheat” and don’t ACTUALLY bring them with you we won’t know
      because we didn’t add that as a specific task. lol.

  • hagreen

    If the whole city flooded we would be meeting in the next town, 45 min away, we are modifing it for our family, to our neighborhood flooded. Hope this doesn't count as cheating. This is so much fun, my kids are loving it!!! Thanks for all you guys have done!!!

  • I'm really interested to see how those people who were trying to do this without cars did it. If the whole city is being evacuated, how in the world are you going to get out?

  • LGCS

    Got the E-mail about 0640 this morning & was out of the house by 0650. (I had to go to work). Could not find my powdered milk in my 72hr kit, so I could not have my instant breakfast. Had to settled for a snack bar & glass of crystal light. Lucky I took my medication before this started. I had not put my 2nd weekly pill box in my backpack. It's sitting on by bathroom counter all filled up. Only have 2.75 gal water, but also have 1 gal of soda in my car pack. I do have 2 changes of clothes & 1 work uniform sealed in ziplock bags along with 3 sets of underthings. I think having a car pack along with a 72hrs pack in a big help. Much more food to choose from. For my car pack I used a #10can with plastic lid packed with items that will last even in 100 degree weather like we have in Louisiana. Oh no forgot the insect Repellent.

  • Luckily the place where I will be “evacuating” to is my sister's house, in the next county over, and she is a nurse. I just so happen to have a suture kit in the first aid bag!

  • Just for clarification… how bad is the toe injury?

    • The toe injury is a small slice that won’t stop bleeding. What will you do
      for it?

      • Luckily the place where I will be “evacuating” to is my sister’s house, in the next county over, and she is a nurse. I just so happen to have a suture kit in the first aid bag!

      • Hold direct pressure for 10-15 mins, as you elevate it. Make a pressure dressing and don’t let them walk on it. If you don’t know how to do this, take a first aid class or get with a boy scout, etc. FYI, a sanitary pad makes a GREAT dressing (clean and absorbent), and you can hold it in place with that tapeless dressing material. It is called coban if you buy it at a drug store, but you can get it at IFA, etc as it is used to wrap horses’ ankles, etc. It is much cheaper at IFA-type stores (and better colors, too).

  • dorothysandaker

    We needed to know if we could take the car when we left the house. We have had drills in our ward where cars were not to be used and some where you could use the car. Big dif

  • Anonymous

    You state no power. Do you mean no power from electrical company or all power supplies? I have a generator & a backup generator. Also propane bottles & stove.

  • Great all is well so far. I have a generator to power my sump pump so I can pump the water out of my basement! I can take 1 dog with me, no room for 2 (they are big) my chickens will have to stay though. Hopefully they will make it. This is a great learning experience!

  • YES! We should have clarified. You would definitely want to bring your
    pets. If you want to see how that would really work out, then try it
    today. If you “cheat” and don't ACTUALLY bring them with you we won't know
    because we didn't add that as a specific task. lol.

  • Can you please let us know if pets were evacuated as well? I assume so for a flood, however I live on the tip-top of a mountain (if we flood, we're all in trouble) so I'm not positive here. I presume we're taking our critters?

  • No power from the electrical company. If you have a generator you will be
    in good shape!

  • The toe injury is a small slice that won't stop bleeding. What will you do
    for it?

  • Just for clarification… how bad is the toe injury?

  • LGCS

    You state no power. Do you mean no power from electrical company or all power supplies? I have a generator & a backup generator. Also propane bottles & stove.

  • Anonymous

    This is such a great idea! Can’t wait to try it tomorrow!