The 7 Day Challenge: Day 5 (SUNDAY)

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There has been an earthquake and you have lost some utilities

limits1

  • For this day, and ALL days of the challenge: no spending money, no going to stores, and no restaurants.
  • Your water pipe broke, and you have no water access
  • The power has been cut off
  • It’s the 2nd day of the earthquake, your fridge food has gone bad, but the food in your freezer has managed to stay cold enough to use
  • You’re driving home from checking on a family member and the road is blocked with a bunch of large rocks from the earthquake, did you have a small car shovel (this is a very highly recommended item to store in your car)
  • During the earthquake a beam fell on your computer(s) and crushed it. Did you have your data backed up in a remote location?
  • Keep your family entertained all day with no power

ADVANCED “FOLKS” (for anyone who feels up to it)

  • If you have a generator – it got CRUSHED!
  • Unfortunately all fridges and freezers in your home ALSO got crushed!

REMEMBER, TOMORROW’S LIMITATIONS AND TASKS WILL BE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT. How long would you have lasted under these conditions?

7win

Each day we will be giving a prize to someone who provided feedback to that day’s challenge.  *Click here to see who won Day 4’s PRIZE. To provide feedback on today’s challenge, do one of the following:

7face1
face723

ques71

To be filled out at the END of the day.
Remember this is for us all to learn so fill it out honestly!

[form 6 “Day 5 Questionnaire”]
  • it is given that there was earthquake and some of the utilities has been alot in the earth quake.

  • it is given that there was earthquake and some of the utilities has been alot in the earth quake.

  • it is given that there was earthquake and some of the utilities has been alot in the earth quake.

  • max191

    I happen to enter your blog with the help of google search. To my sheer luck I got what I was searching for. Thanks
    regards
    charcoal grill

  • max191

    I happen to enter your blog with the help of google search. To my sheer luck I got what I was searching for. Thanks
    regards
    charcoal grill

  • Anonymous

    We have alot of earthquakes here. So this one was pretty easy.

  • Csherrychavez

    We have alot of earthquakes here. So this one was pretty easy.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xV1xRP7XQI&feature=related

    1994 NORTHRIDGE EARTHQUAKE NEWS FOOTAGE

  • Anonymous

    This was an easy one for us. Although we live in an area that is VERY unlikely to have an earthquake, we would be OK in this situation. We have plenty of potable water stored for several days, and other water we could use for washing and cleaning. We have a variety of cooking options from camp stoves and backpacking stoves of several kinds and fuels to dutch oven cooking on the fire pit in the back yard – my DH is a pro at that, including desserts. We have many options for food as well. We also have a variety of tents and camping gear we could use. Besides this we have a motorhome in our back yard that would provide all the facilities we would need even if we couldn’t drive anywhere due to the roads. (We would have to clean it out, though, because we are in the process of moving and are using it for storage right now;-)

    TIP: One reason we have all this stuff is because my husband and I , now in our 60’s, have spent many years working in the scouting program both as youth leaders and as trainers. Are your kids in scouts? If so, do they have good survival/camping skills? If they don’t you need to talk to your scout leaders and find out why – and encourage them to work on this. You might be amazed at what kids can do. Thanks, Debbie for telling us about your son!

    We have lots of games and good books to read to keep us and others entertained.

    We do have a shovel in our car along with other basic tools and emergency items, but this shovel would not move large rocks on the road.

    Now the confession – we don’t have either of our computers backed up – we’ll get on this right away:-(

  • Melissa Sanchez

    We had a lot of previous commitments today so weren’t able to go without power. (dinner guests, had to make refreshments for an event)However, found out that I am not prepared for an earthquake. I don’t have a shovel in my car and I don’t have a back up for my computer. Where can I purchase these things? I did find out that I have plenty of water. I have them stored in various sizes. This helps a lot. ( 16.9 ounces, 1 gallon, 5 gallon, and 55 gallon.) What ideas do others have about ways to entertain small children without electricity?

  • Anonymous

    In these type of situations where we are not shopping or spending money it is nice to be able to go to the pantry or freezer for fruits and vegetables. If there is something I would stock up on even more, it would be a variety of both. We had steak and potatoes and actually a pretty nice meal using stored foods. Our son is going to help me back up the computer, we have not done that yet. Good Challenge to keep us thinking.

  • jocelynrobertson

    This was an easy one for us. Although we live in an area that is VERY unlikely to have an earthquake, we would be OK in this situation. We have plenty of potable water stored for several days, and other water we could use for washing and cleaning. We have a variety of cooking options from camp stoves and backpacking stoves of several kinds and fuels to dutch oven cooking on the fire pit in the back yard – my DH is a pro at that, including desserts. We have many options for food as well. We also have a variety of tents and camping gear we could use. Besides this we have a motorhome in our back yard that would provide all the facilities we would need even if we couldn't drive anywhere due to the roads. (We would have to clean it out, though, because we are in the process of moving and are using it for storage right now;-)

    TIP: One reason we have all this stuff is because my husband and I , now in our 60's, have spent many years working in the scouting program both as youth leaders and as trainers. Are your kids in scouts? If so, do they have good survival/camping skills? If they don't you need to talk to your scout leaders and find out why – and encourage them to work on this. You might be amazed at what kids can do. Thanks, Debbie for telling ua about your son!

    We do have a shovel in our car along with other basic tools and emergancy items, but this shovel would not move large rocks on the road.

    Now the confession – we don't have either of our computers backed up – we'll get on this right away:-(

  • this one just happend on last weeks THE COLONY.

  • Anonymous

    Been trying today. We cooked steaks and potaotes on the grill, baked potatoes which we didn’t think would work. thank goodness we had enough propane. Got milk from a friend who borrowed lemon juice last week, she repaid me with a gallon! the solar powered radio worked great, my husband listened to the football game on it. We have a battery powered radio, but no batteries! This has been a great way to test our stamina, but like others have said we are pretty much out of fresh food and will need to get really creative with what we’ve got left.I got Mozy back up just last week, so that was great!

  • KimL

    We do not have our computer info backed up. I was still able to cook because of stored water and a gas stove but I really should have a dutch oven and the other gear for cooking outdoors in case gas lines were broken. We stayed entertained by reading and drawing!

  • Suzanne Stokes

    I really need an off site back-up! I would really have a hard time if I lost my hard drive. My life is on the computer!

  • Melissa Sanchez

    We had a lot of previous commitments today so weren't able to go without power. (dinner guests, had to make refreshments for an event)However, found out that I am not prepared for an earthquake. I don't have a shovel in my car and I don't have a back up for my computer. Where can I purchase these things? I did find out that I have plenty of water. I have them stored in various sizes. This helps a lot. ( 16.9 ounces, 1 gallon, 5 gallon, and 55 gallon.) What ideas do others have about ways to entertain small children without electricity?

  • lbrewer

    In these type of situations where we are not shopping or spending money it is nice to be able to go to the pantry or freezer for fruits and vegetables. If there is something I would stock up on even more, it would be a variety of both. We had steak and potatoes and actually a pretty nice meal using stored foods. Our son is going to help me back up the computer, we have not done that yet. Good Challenge to keep us thinking.

  • Anonymous

    I am glad that I had my computer stuff backed up. You just don’t realize how much you rely on the basics until they are not there. We didn’t realize how much water we really used until we had this happen and had to plan it out. This has opened our eyes to how much we really are not prepared. We have been taking notes and learning from what others have said they did to handle the challenge. The ideas have been great and hopefully we will be much better prepared when these things really do happen to use. Thanks so much for the practice run. This was such a great idea.

  • Stephen Schaefer

    No problems so far–have been pretty well prepared and well stocked with propane and kerosene. Need a better way to back up computer but we can live without it. Have tents that we could use if need be and lots of camping equipment. We try not to watch TV on Sabbath day and use that for family time so that was a moot point. Have been enjoying all this.

  • this one just happend on last weeks THE COLONY.

  • Anonymous

    I am so glad that we bought a butane stove. Between that and the gas grill we were able to cook. This week is getting more and more difficult as I haven’t shopped since 9-2. There is very little left in the freezer and tomorrow and Tuesday are going to be pretty much pantry food only.

    Boy is the week ever eye opening to me! Thank you again, Jodi and Julie.

  • sharonhaynie

    Been trying today. We cooked steaks and potaotes on the grill, baked potatoes which we didn't think would work. thank goodness we had enough propane. Got milk from a friend who borrowed lemon juice last week, she repaid me with a gallon! the solar powered radio worked great, my husband listened to the football game on it. We have a battery powered radio, but no batteries! This has been a great way to test our stamina, but like others have said we are pretty much out of fresh food and will need to get really creative with what we've got left.I got Mozy back up just last week, so that was great!

  • KimL

    We do not have our computer info backed up. I was still able to cook because of stored water and a gas stove but I really should have a dutch oven and the other gear for cooking outdoors in case gas lines were broken. We stayed entertained by reading and drawing!

  • Suzanne Stokes

    I really need an off site back-up! I would really have a hard time if I lost my hard drive. My life is on the computer!

  • Sheila Shepardson

    It is hard sometimes when you see a need and other family members do not. It is a time when I will be trusting God.

  • krazedma

    I am glad that I had my computer stuff backed up. You just don't realize how much you rely on the basics until they are not there. We didn't realize how much water we really used until we had this happen and had to plan it out. This has opened our eyes to how much we really are not prepared. We have been taking notes and learning from what others have said they did to handle the challenge. The ideas have been great and hopefully we will be much better prepared when these things really do happen to use. Thanks so much for the practice run. This was such a great idea.

  • Anonymous

    These scenarios really make you think everything through. You don’t realize that there are so many details involved when disasters strike. What you are doing is a wonderful way to help us all be better prepared. I thought we were well prepared, but boy have I been surprised!

  • Stephen Schaefer

    No problems so far–have been pretty well prepared and well stocked with propane and kerosene. Need a better way to back up computer but we can live without it. Have tents that we could use if need be and lots of camping equipment. We try not to watch TV on Sabbath day and use that for family time so that was a moot point. Have been enjoying all this.

  • barbarapak

    I am so glad that we bought a butane stove. Between that and the gas grill we were able to cook. This week is getting more and more difficult as I haven't shopped since 9-2. There is very little left in the freezer and tomorrow and Tuesday are going to be pretty much pantry food only.

    Boy is the week ever eye opening to me! Thank you again, Jodi and Julie.

  • Sheila Shepardson

    It is hard sometimes when you see a need and other family members do not. It is a time when I will be trusting God.

  • I have thought a lot about alternative cooking methods. If things aren’t too bad, and we have our natural gas, we have a gas stove that we can use the burners without electricity (but not the oven). I thought about using my little, homemade solar oven for today, but it is overcast and threatening to rain, so that wouldn’t work today. I have a camp stove and fuel, and a propane BBQ grill. I have buddy burners (those tin cans filled with rolled cardboard and wax or sawdust and wax, and I have a stove made out of a #10 can to put over them–unfortunately, the “stove” is pretty rusty, after being in our shed which leaked last year. I also have those paint can/alcohol stoves. I used to have a wood-burning stove, but we moved from that house, and unfortunately we haven’t been able to get anything like that here yet. I have learned about haybox cooking, where you bring your food to a boil and put it in a well-insulated spot, and the residual heat cooks it. I think in an on-going disaster I would quickly have to use solar cooking as much as possible, using our fueled cooking when solar wasn’t practical, and using haybox cooking for as much as possible also, so we could ration our our available fuels.

  • Anonymous

    Wow. This is a big one. I hope we can get computer back up soon. Also, I need more fuel for cooking. The interesting thing about emergencies is that you never know where you will be when they strike. I would hate for something to happen while I was apart from my family. I really need to train my kids to know what to do as well.

  • Having been a a few earthquakes– none of which were really bad, and having had plenty of drills– you need to make this a bit more realistic:

    Your water pipe broke, and you have no water access /The power has been cut off —
    I think here– it is important that you know WHERE to shut off the lines to your house– natural gas or propane shut-off, water cut-off valve, electrical breaker or fuse box– and HOW to do it. And be ABLE to do it. The utility companies may not be able to get things shut off quickly, and it’s a very dangerous combination having electrical sparks with gas, and/or electrical lines in water. Turn yours off if you even suspect damage to your lines.

    It’s the 2nd day of the earthquake, your fridge food has gone bad, but the food in your freezer has managed to stay cold enough to use —
    THIS is unrealistic. If you have access to your refrigerator, and keep it closed, food will last several days– not spoil in one. I dealt with a typhoon induced electrical outage– 3 days without power in 90+F heat, and the food was fine. Just keep the kids (and hubby) from opening it every 10 minutes to “look”, and you’ll do OK.

    If there is no access to the refrigerator because of structrual damage to the house, we do have food storage that doesn’t require refrigeration, but unfortunately, all of that is in the house (except a bit in the cars’ 72hr kits), and if the kitchen is inaccessible, the rest of the house may also not be accessable. What should be done about that situation, especially if roads may not be passable? Storage outside is not an option because of adverse environmental conditions, and apartment dwellers may not have any outside storage. (I have things like blankets and paper goods outside, and cooking equipment, but except for seasonal fruit, no food).

    You’re driving home from checking on a family member and the road is blocked with a bunch of large rocks from the earthquake, did you have a small car shovel (this is a very highly recommended item to store in your car) —
    A small shovel will be useless for moving big rocks…. When “big rocks” end up on the roads, heavy earthmoving equipment and/or explosives are needed to clear them. You may be able to use your small shovel to dig a latrine pit while you wait, but that would be about it. Or use it to fend off coyotes on your walk home. Just don’t count on one to clear the road for you.

  • tracibryan

    These scenarios really make you think everything through. You don't realize that there are so many details involved when disasters strike. What you are doing is a wonderful way to help us all be better prepared. I thought we were well prepared, but boy have I been surprised!

  • Anonymous

    I did not read this until went got home from church. So we started then by fining our home a damaged. We have all of our camping gear stored in a small shed away from the house. It did just fine. Our BBQ did not survive since it was in the garage under the house. We made some small stoves out of #10 cans. For our heat source for cooking we used our tuna cans that we had filled with cardboard and wax. They work great for small meals. I have had problems with computers before so I have put all my information on backup hard drive that I keep in a safe box. I also make copies on disk of family pictures and documents. It is a good thing that it is still warm. But we do have slepping gear to keep warm if needed. My daughter is liking the fact that we do camping and no showers. I hope that we have water for Monday so we can clean up some of the mess that we have been going through because of all the things that have been happening. We have decide to use our generator to keep the food in the freezer food from going bad. It looks like hot dogs and beans for dinner.

  • I have thought a lot about alternative cooking methods. If things aren't too bad, and we have our natural gas, we have a gas stove that we can use the burners without electricity (but not the oven). I thought about using my little, homemade solar oven for today, but it is overcast and threatening to rain, so that wouldn't work today. I have a camp stove and fuel, and a propane BBQ grill. I have buddy burners (those tin cans filled with rolled cardboard and wax or sawdust and wax, and I have a stove made out of a #10 can to put over them–unfortunately, the “stove” is pretty rusty, after being in our shed which leaked last year. I also have those paint can/alcohol stoves. I used to have a wood-burning stove, but we moved from that house, and unfortunately we haven't been able to get anything like that here yet. I have learned about haybox cooking, where you bring your food to a boil and put it in a well-insulated spot, and the residual heat cooks it. I think in an on-going disaster I would quickly have to use solar cooking as much as possible, using our fueled cooking when solar wasn't practical, and using haybox cooking for as much as possible also, so we could ration our our available fuels.

  • mithreesons

    Wow. This is a big one. I hope we can get computer back up soon. Also, I need more fuel for cooking. The interesting thing about emergencies is that you never know where you will be when they strike. I would hate for something to happen while I was apart from my family. I really need to train my kids to know what to do as well.

  • Having been a a few earthquakes– none of which were really bad, and having had plenty of drills– you need to make this a bit more realistic:

    Your water pipe broke, and you have no water access /The power has been cut off —
    I think here– it is important that you know WHERE to shut off the lines to your house– natural gas or propane shut-off, water cut-off valve, electrical breaker or fuse box– and HOW to do it. And be ABLE to do it. The utility companies may not be able to get things shut off quickly, and it's a very dangerous combination having electrical sparks with gas, and/or electrical lines in water. Turn yours off if you even suspect damage to your lines.

    It’s the 2nd day of the earthquake, your fridge food has gone bad, but the food in your freezer has managed to stay cold enough to use —
    THIS is unrealistic. If you have access to your refrigerator, and keep it closed, food will last several days– not spoil in one. I dealt with a typhoon induced electrical outage– 3 days without power in 90+F heat, and the food was fine. Just keep the kids (and hubby) from opening it every 10 minutes to “look”, and you'll do OK.

    If there is no access to the refrigerator because of structrual damage to the house, we do have food storage that doesn't require refrigeration, but unfortunately, all of that is in the house (except a bit in the cars' 72hr kits), and if the kitchen is inaccessible, the rest of the house may also not be accessable. What should be done about that situation, especially if roads may not be passable? Storage outside is not an option because of adverse environmental conditions, and apartment dwellers may not have any outside storage. (I have things like blankets and paper goods outside, and cooking equipment, but except for seasonal fruit, no food).

    You’re driving home from checking on a family member and the road is blocked with a bunch of large rocks from the earthquake, did you have a small car shovel (this is a very highly recommended item to store in your car) —
    A small shovel will be useless for moving big rocks…. When “big rocks” end up on the roads, heavy earthmoving equipment and/or explosives are needed to clear them. You may be able to use your small shovel to dig a latrine pit while you wait, but that would be about it. Or use it to fend off coyotes on your walk home. Just don't count on one to clear the road for you.

  • krazedma

    I did not read this until went got home from church. So we started then by fining our home a damaged. We have all of our camping gear stored in a small shed away from the house. It did just fine. Our BBQ did not survive since it was in the garage under the house. We made some small stoves out of #10 cans. For our heat source for cooking we used our tuna cans that we had filled with cardboard and wax. They work great for small meals. I have had problems with computers before so I have put all my information on backup hard drive that I keep in a safe box. I also make copies on disk of family pictures and documents. It is a good thing that it is still warm. But we do have slepping gear to keep warm if needed. My daughter is liking the fact that we do camping and no showers. I hope that we have water for Monday so we can clean up some of the mess that we have been going through because of all the things that have been happening. We have decide to use our generator to keep the food in the freezer food from going bad. It looks like hot dogs and beans for dinner.

  • Anonymous

    I had some questions about this one. Did the earthquake happen early in the morning or while we were at Church? Did I have water to get ready for Church? No biggy, could handle it either way. I pretended we were on our way home from Church and found the road block and finally found our house in shambles. My CERT training kicked in and I wouldn’t let anyone in till it had been checked out for safty. Then we went in and secured the roof as best we could where the beams had come down. Got out what we needed and went to our “bug out place”. Our camper. I don’t trust any structure that has beams coming down on the computer. Our camper is parked a safe distance from the house so it was not damaged. Fired up the generator for power to keep the freezer going. Had plenty of propane for the camper, if we don’t have to use it for heat, to last several days. A small shovel in the trunk of the car isn’t going to do much good at clearing a slide across the road with large rocks like you said, but it may help us get around the slide. I agree the CERT back packs should be in the car at all times for times like this. Cooking for us was no problem because I keep the camper stocked with utensals and try to keep the propane tanks both full. In summer even keep the water tank full with silver to keep it fresh enough to use. Our food storage is in the basement and I just hope we were able to get to it. If not we may be in real trouble. but we have more than one way to get in so think we would be alright. Not sure how the glass canning jars would fare in a large earth quake. got to get some protection across the front of the shelves so the jars won’t fall off. Haven’t done that yet. Sorry to loose my brand new computer and my backup was in the desk drawer so don’t know if it would have survived. From now on I will put the back up of all that geneology in the strong box. Entertainment for us, hubby and I wouldn’t be a problem either. At that point just give us a pillow of somekind and a safe place to lay down and we will be just fine. Both over 70 you know doesn’t take much to entertain us.

  • Anonymous

    I just found the feedback on Facebook too..awesome I am getting some great ideas!
    Yes to the recipe submissions!

  • Oh my! How on earth did you come up with these disaster scenarios? You are really working us up into some doozies! :o)

  • Anonymous

    If our house was unlivable we have a “wall tent” and a camping tent. We have the supplies to camp if needed. Concerned if house was damaged, food/water storage is in the basement. Deep freeze and extra refrigerator is in the garage.
    No generator, but enough propane,lantern oil and batteries for many days.
    Now to research how keep freezer going, or preserve more meat by canning. No back up for computer….
    Need to keep CERT backpack/shovel in van if there was emergency on the
    road.
    I am loving the challenges! I hope you will do this every year! Maybe have a contest of submitted scenarios 🙂

  • dorothysandaker

    I had some questions about this one. Did the earthquake happen early in the morning or while we were at Church? Did I have water to get ready for Church? No biggy, could handle it either way. I pretended we were on our way home from Church and found the road block and finally found our house in shambles. My CERT training kicked in and I wouldn't let anyone in till it had been checked out for safty. Then we went in and secured the roof as best we could where the beams had come down. Got out what we needed and went to our “bug out place”. Our camper. I don't trust any structure that has beams coming down on the computer. Our camper is parked a safe distance from the house so it was not damaged. Fired up the generator for power to keep the freezer going. Had plenty of propane for the camper, if we don't have to use it for heat, to last several days. A small shovel in the trunk of the car isn't going to do much good at clearing a slide across the road with large rocks like you said, but it may help us get around the slide. I agree the CERT back packs should be in the car at all times for times like this. Cooking for us was no problem because I keep the camper stocked with utensals and try to keep the propane tanks both full. In summer even keep the water tank full with silver to keep it fresh enough to use. Our food storage is in the basement and I just hope we were able to get to it. If not we may be in real trouble. but we have more than one way to get in so think we would be alright. Not sure how the glass canning jars would fare in a large earth quake. got to get some protection across the front of the shelves so the jars won't fall off. Haven't done that yet. Sorry to loose my brand new computer and my backup was in the desk drawer so don't know if it would have survived. From now on I will put the back up of all that geneology in the strong box. Entertainment for us, hubby and I wouldn't be a problem either. At that point just give us a pillow of somekind and a safe place to lay down and we will be just fine. Both over 70 you know doesn't take much to entertain us.

  • Don’t know how to respond to the earthquake bit as we never get them in my neck of the woods (Durban, South Africa). We do get the occasional rock fall in the mountain passes.I had stored water, food, candles and matches, a stove which runs on biofuel if I needed to cook. I would have lost my computer, so that is something I need to look at. We always have plenty of cards and board games and I thought a trip down memory lane through our photo albums, recalling happy times might help to lift the mood.I have tried as best I could to react to your “situations”, but there are some of them that would never happen here.Once the week is over I am going to evaluate what has happened over the week, and try and pass the lessons I have learnt on to our RS sisters. Hopefully it will help them too.

  • lauradean

    I just found the feedback on Facebook too..awesome I am getting some great ideas!
    Yes to the recipe submissions!

  • Oh my! How on earth did you come up with these disaster scenarios? You are really working us up into some doozies! :o)

  • lauradean

    If our house was unlivable we have a “wall tent” and a camping tent. We have the supplies to camp if needed. Concerned if house was damaged, food/water storage is in the basement. Deep freeze and extra refrigerator is in the garage.
    No generator, but enough propane,lantern oil and batteries for many days.
    Now to research how keep freezer going, or preserve more meat by canning. No back up for computer….
    Need to keep CERT backpack/shovel in van if there was emergency on the
    road.
    I am loving the challenges! I hope you will do this every year! Maybe have a contest of submitted scenarios 🙂

  • Don't know how to respond to the earthquake bit as we never get them in my neck of the woods (Durban, South Africa). We do get the occasional rock fall in the mountain passes.I had stored water, food, candles and matches, a stove which runs on biofuel if I needed to cook. I would have lost my computer, so that is something I need to look at. We always have plenty of cards and board games and I thought a trip down memory lane through our photo albums, recalling happy times might help to lift the mood.I have tried as best I could to react to your “situations”, but there are some of them that would never happen here.Once the week is over I am going to evaluate what has happened over the week, and try and pass the lessons I have learnt on to our RS sisters. Hopefully it will help them too.

  • Anonymous

    We are still camping, but played along anyway. Camping & using only food storage items still shows me that even in our small family of 3 people & 2 dogs, we use a lot of stuff every day. I’m really going to have to re-asses the stuff I store and what we go through daily. I am really learning a lot on this challenge. Keep it coming!

  • kathybeachy

    We are still camping, but played along anyway. Camping & using only food storage items still shows me that even in our small family of 3 people & 2 dogs, we use a lot of stuff every day. I'm really going to have to re-asses the stuff I store and what we go through daily. I am really learning a lot on this challenge. Keep it coming!

  • HJ

    I’m glad day 5 is a little more on the challenging side. Testing our systems one day at a time is interesting but doing two days back-to-back will really help bring out the strengths and weaknesses in our preparations. Thanks ladies!!!

  • Anonymous

    We will do fine. Have 2nd generator as backup. 1 broke during Hugo & had to get a 2nd. My husband had been saying for several years before that we needed a 2nd one & he was right. We have all the necessary equipement to surive in the back yard. The shed out back can even be convertided to a place to sleep out of the weather. I really don’t like camping, but would surive. My husband said if the house gets destroyed he would build us a one room cabin within a few days with what is left of the house. He is a retired carpender. He is still expanding our house at this time, along with gardening & taking care of the orchard. He keep busy.

  • Heather

    Well, I did not do the Saturday challenge as it was intended. However, I wanted to share something else we did that was fun and easy, but it was useful.

    Without warning the kids ahead of time, I set a kitchen timer for five minutes and told them we were doing a safety drill. I started the countdown and gave them instructions like: Find a flashlight – the first person to get one “wins”! (But everybody had to find one.) I had them find portable radios too, and then I told them to grab their emergency food kits. They put it all in one location.

    Then I gave some more random instructions – I said we were pretending to evacuate due to flood (this is a good example for kids because they understand why that would be a reason to evacuate). I requested a can of cat food, a gallon of bottled water, and a bottle of Gatorade. Also, I said that one of us had a pretend cut and needed a bandage and Neosporin.

    My kids are 6, 8, and 10 and they did all this in four minutes! There was one minute left on the timer. I then showed them the “family” bag that has the things that are not in their food kits, such as the garden work gloves, sterno-type stoves, etc.

    Last, I let them each pick one treat to eat from their emergency kits. It was great fun and the whole process was just a few minutes. I think we’ll do this again some time.

  • HJ

    I'm glad day 5 is a little more on the challenging side. Testing our systems one day at a time is interesting but doing two days back-to-back will really help bring out the strengths and weaknesses in our preparations. Thanks ladies!!!

  • LGCS

    We will do fine. Have 2nd generator as backup. 1 broke during Hugo & had to get a 2nd. My husband had been saying for several years before that we needed a 2nd one & he was right. We have all the necessary equipement to surive in the back yard. The shed out back can even be convertided to a place to sleep out of the weather. I really don't like camping, but would surive. My husband said if the house gets destroyed he would build us a one room cabin within a few days with what is left of the house. He is a retired carpender. He is still expanding our house at this time, along with gardening & taking care of the orchard. He keep busy.

  • Heather

    Well, I did not do the Saturday challenge as it was intended. However, I wanted to share something else we did that was fun and easy, but it was useful.

    Without warning the kids ahead of time, I set a kitchen timer for five minutes and told them we were doing a safety drill. I started the countdown and gave them instructions like: Find a flashlight – the first person to get one “wins”! (But everybody had to find one.) I had them find portable radios too, and then I told them to grab their emergency food kits. They put it all in one location.

    Then I gave some more random instructions – I said we were pretending to evacuate due to flood (this is a good example for kids because they understand why that would be a reason to evacuate). I requested a can of cat food, a gallon of bottled water, and a bottle of Gatorade. Also, I said that one of us had a pretend cut and needed a bandage and Neosporin.

    My kids are 6, 8, and 10 and they did all this in four minutes! There was one minute left on the timer. I then showed them the “family” bag that has the things that are not in their food kits, such as the garden work gloves, sterno-type stoves, etc.

    Last, I let them each pick one treat to eat from their emergency kits. It was great fun and the whole process was just a few minutes. I think we'll do this again some time.