Spice Up Your Comfort Foods

Step 9: Comfort Foods is one of our favorite steps. When we participated in our 7 Day Challenge we came to realize just how important these foods really are in making your life feel somewhat normal in an emergency, and also in adding variety to your long term storage foods. We recommend getting a few spare bottles of spices/herbs that you commonly use. This will ensure you have enough for your long term cooking needs, and also give you the convenience and cost-savings in the short term. Don’t go overboard on buying too many bottles though, as spices can lose their flavor over time.

spices-stock

Here are a list of common spices/herbs to get you started:

Herbs*
Basil
Bay Leaves
Chives
Cilantro
Dill
Mint
Oregano
Parsley
Rosemary
Sage
Tarragon
Thyme

Spices*
Allspice
Black Pepper
Caraway
Cardamom
Celery Salt/Seed
Chili Powder
Cinnamon
Cloves
Coriander
Cumin
Fennel
Fenugreek
Garlic Powder/Salt
Ginger
Mustard Seed/Dry Mustard
Nutmeg
Onion Powder/Salt
Paprika
Red pepper flakes
Saffron
Turmeric
Vanilla
White Pepper

* Herbs are the leafy, green plant parts used for flavouring purposes, and may be used fresh or dried, typically cut into very small pieces. Spices are dried and often ground or grated into a powder. Small seeds, such as fennel and mustard seeds, are used both whole and in powder form.

Feel free to add your own ideas in the comments below


  • We started ordering from San Francisco Herb Co about once or twice a year. Most of the items come in 1 lb sealed bags, but some come in an8 oz. bag. It’s a lot to buy at once for most items so definitely makes sense to go in on it with one or more other families. The costs are low enough that you can afford to give some of it away if you need to. They also sell tea, nuts, seeds and liquid extract flavorings, which can help build an order up to meet a minimum for quantity discount.

    Save your favorite spice bottles to refill, even start collecting a particular style that you like, then soak off the brand label. Or look for sets of cute bottles at places like import stores. Then use cute hand-written or computer-generated labels to make them all a similar style. It’s taking me time to build up a complete set of little square spice jars, but talk to your friends about saving them for you, some people just recycle or through them away. Write the date you refilled, or the date of original purchase, on the bottom of the bottle.

    If you have a good metal or glass food blender or grinder, buy the whole spices like cloves and allspice berries – they will stay fresher longer if you grind them within a few weeks or months of when you will use them.

    For long term dry storage for our backup inventory, we recently purchased the canning lid seal attachment to the FoodSaver unit and then packing the excess in canning jars in our dark, cool cellar. It works great if you have the space!

  • val

    Check around your area to see if there’s a food or bulk co-op near you. We have Azure Standard available to us. I can get my spices and herbs at a fairly good price and in bulk too. For items I don’t go through very quickly I split the price of a bag with a friend and we both get the item for much cheaper than most grocery store prices.

  • Nina Saavedra

    I became a fan on fb

  • Nina Saavedra

    I became a fan on fb

  • Nina Saavedra

    I became a fan on fb

  • what i did was i gought 8 different spices at the 99cents only store. the spices are wide and varied there in their "gourmet" section. but i now have seasonings that can go on salads, soul food, various poultries, steaks, hams, etc…

  • what i did was i gought 8 different spices at the 99cents only store. the spices are wide and varied there in their "gourmet" section. but i now have seasonings that can go on salads, soul food, various poultries, steaks, hams, etc…

  • Excellent! Great article, I already saved it to my favourite,