How To Make Strawberry Jam

As you may have seen on our Facebook fan page, strawberries have been on sale for crazy low prices lately, resulting in a lot of us making up some delicious strawberry jam. A few of our readers mentioned being nervous to try making it so I decided to post a step by step guide here so you can see how easy it really is. Some people make strawberry freezer jam but my favorite is the regular cooked jam so that is what I’m posting here!

How to make strawberry jam!

jam1Gather everything you need to get started, including some helpers. jam2Chop off the tops of the berries and any gross parts (2 quarts = 1 batch).
 
jam3Chop up the berries. Oh how I love my imitation slap chop. Although it IS falling apart so I might have to splurge for a REAL one soon! jam4Pour the beautiful chopped berries into a large pot and start cooking (if you like chunkier jam you can mash the berries with a potato masher first).
 
jam5Pour in 1/4 c. lemon juice (some recipes don’t call for this). jam6Add the pectin.
 
jam7Add 1/2 tsp. of butter to reduce the foaming. jam8If you like smooth jam like my family, puree it with a Bamix at this step (I love my Bamix too!)
 
jam9While you wait for the strawberries to come to a boil, measure out 7 cups of sugar into a bowl. (Yes SEVEN!) jam10Now take a well-deserved quick break and enjoy an ice cold diet coke. This step is mandatory at my house.
 
jam11Dump the whole bowl of sugar in at once. Bring back to a boil and stir for 1 minute while it boils. jam12Meanwhile, sterilize your jar lids on the stove and try to ignore the fact that my burner looks freakishly purple.
 
jam13Remove the pot from the stove and pour the delicious jam into sterilized jars. One batch makes about 4 small jars. jam14Add the lids and rings and wait for them to pop to know they are sealed. Isn’t this just a beautiful site?



While I didn’t include this part, you should make sure to water bath can your finished jars according to the directions on your pectin package or in your canning guide. This will make sure your jam is properly preserved for long term storage.

Happy jam-making!


  • Ekg1803

    Why do you use pectin for canning strawberries, but not peaches?

  • melissa

    I am new to canning strawberry jam. I was very excited about making it and it all looked good up until I poured the content in to the jars. There is syrup at the bottom and perserves at the top. Please help me!! What did I do wrong?
    Melissa

  • melissa

    I am new to canning strawberry jam. I was very excited about making it and it all looked good up until I poured the content in to the jars. There is syrup at the bottom and perserves at the top. Please help me!! What did I do wrong?
    Melissa

  • melissa

    I am new to canning strawberry jam. I was very excited about making it and it all looked good up until I poured the content in to the jars. There is syrup at the bottom and perserves at the top. Please help me!! What did I do wrong?
    Melissa

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Melissa Kuehl-Coe

    Please! I need help! I'm new at canning and tried the jam recipe, however, I have perserves at the top and syrup at the bottom. What did I do wrong? My gramma's never looked like this:(

  • http://www.facebook.com Melissa Kuehl-Coe

    Please! I need help! I'm new at canning and tried the jam recipe, however, I have perserves at the top and syrup at the bottom. What did I do wrong? My gramma's never looked like this:(

  • Judy

    Jodi, Jam looks great ! Have you checked it to see if it jelled ? I have made jam for years and the only time it didn’t jell was when I wasn’t careful with my measurements. I didn’t see a measurement for the amount of strawberries to sugar. If you have more berries than the proper ratio to sugar it won’t jell. Makes great syrup though for ice cream ! I would just encourage new jam and jelly makers to simply measure carefully and then the process is easy like you said ! Also they should make sure their jars and lids are sterile before using or the jam can spoil. I always put my jars of jam in a large pot that is sufficient to be able to cover the jars with water and just bring to a boil and boil for 15 min. Then they are good to go. You are doing such a fine job and I love that you include the children . They will remember that all their lives. Your a good mommy !

  • Judy

    Jodi, Jam looks great ! Have you checked it to see if it jelled ? I have made jam for years and the only time it didn't jell was when I wasn't careful with my measurements. I didn't see a measurement for the amount of strawberries to sugar. If you have more berries than the proper ratio to sugar it won't jell. Makes great syrup though for ice cream ! I would just encourage new jam and jelly makers to simply measure carefully and then the process is easy like you said ! Also they should make sure their jars and lids are sterile before using or the jam can spoil. I always put my jars of jam in a large pot that is sufficient to be able to cover the jars with water and just bring to a boil and boil for 15 min. Then they are good to go. You are doing such a fine job and I love that you include the children . They will remember that all their lives. Your a good mommy !

  • Name

    If you skip the canner stage, your jam will technically have NO shelf life. It must be water-bath canned in order to be safe and shelf-stable. You could skip the canning and store them in your fridge for a few weeks, or your freezer for a few months. But it really wouldn't be safe to keep them on the shelf, even if the lids have sealed, because you didn't get the internal temperature high enough for a long enough time to prevent the growth of possible mold and bacteria.

  • Linda A.

    As a Master Food Preserver from the County of San Bernardino, CA, the “open kettle” method of preservation is NOT recommended as a safe way to preserve anything!! There are organisms that could be present in any area you are using to preserve that can be introduced into the product, jars, or lids. These organisms will be destroyed using the water bath canner or the steam canner. The length of the heating process is less than a half an hour, why take the chance of your product spoiling because of improper processing at the least, and even worse, making your family and friends sick. Also, cleaning the rims of your jars with a warm,wet paper towel will remove any product that would prevent a proper seal on your jars AFTER YOU HAVE PROCESSED THEM ACCORDING TO THE INSTRUCTIONS IN THE RECIPE OR THE PECTIN BOX! The jelly looks lovely and there are so many types to make that are delicious, please process them correctly. The Ball Blue Book is a great, inexpensive resource as well as any University Extension Office(online) if you need help.

  • Anonymous

    I am all for home jam, but I get my fruit from my own trees, vines & bushes. The cost of the jars can be hard, but if you buy a case a year it is not so bad. This year I hope to put up concord grapes, blackberries, blueberries, peaches, plums, pears, & apples, along with my peas, greenbeans, tomatoes, & hopefully carrots. My husband said no corn this year. We are still eatting last years harvest with the purplehull peas. I want to try putting up some stew meat & hamburger in jars & see what happens.

  • Linda A.

    As a Master Food Preserver from the County of San Bernardino, CA, the “open kettle” method of preservation is NOT recommended as a safe way to preserve anything!! There are organisms that could be present in any area you are using to preserve that can be introduced into the product, jars, or lids. These organisms will be destroyed using the water bath canner or the steam canner. The length of the heating process is less than a half an hour, why take the chance of your product spoiling because of improper processing at the least, and even worse, making your family and friends sick. Also, cleaning the rims of your jars with a warm,wet paper towel will remove any product that would prevent a proper seal on your jars AFTER YOU HAVE PROCESSED THEM ACCORDING TO THE INSTRUCTIONS IN THE RECIPE OR THE PECTIN BOX! The jelly looks lovely and there are so many types to make that are delicious, please process them correctly. The Ball Blue Book is a great, inexpensive resource as well as any University Extension Office(online) if you need help.

  • lgcsmallwood

    I am all for home jam, but I get my fruit from my own trees, vines & bushes. The cost of the jars can be hard, but if you buy a case a year it is not so bad. This year I hope to put up concord grapes, blackberries, blueberries, peaches, plums, pears, & apples, along with my peas, greenbeans, tomatoes, & hopefully carrots. My husband said no corn this year. We are still eatting last years harvest with the purplehull peas. I want to try putting up some stew meat & hamburger in jars & see what happens.

  • http://www.mamasheartblog.com sue

    Dear Person Who Is Nameless,

    I wish you'd used your name! It makes it seem like you're posting a hit-and-run comment. :

    While the USDA isn't officially “in charge” of home canning, they do have reach through the university extension offices all over the US. And as evidenced by your further comments, they do have opinions about home canning.

    When I started canning, some 15 yrs ago, there was no internet, no multiple places to check information. The inversion-method that I mentioned was included in a package of Ball canning jam jars as an acceptable method, per the USDA. I had no reason to doubt any of that information. The USDA also used to advocate no water-bath canning for jam and sealing with hot paraffin, and also removing any mould growth from the jam and consuming the rest. They have since changed their collective minds on the hot paraffin and the mould-scraping, and based on one site I saw, they have also changed their minds on inversion of jam, on the *potential* of burns, wasted jam, etc. They didn't indicate problems with inverted jam jars & lids with regard to botulism, as if you've sterilized your jars, lids, and used boiling jam there is no chance for the botulinum toxin to survive. They did indicate that for “long-term storage,” this inverted jam has a shorter shelf-life, but our jam never lasts more than 15 months, at the most – because we eat it. One of the things that makes jam “safe” for this method (and you'll note I never said it was for other types of canning) is the immense amount of sugar in the jam – between acid in the fruit and sugar added, jam is considered “safe” from botulism, in general.

    You can, of course, do whatever you'd like with your home canning and produce. While it might not be the currently favoured-method of canning jam, it's not dangerous and it does work.

  • Name

    Could you please post your source where the USDA (which actually has no authority over home canning, so I can't imagine they would even publish anything about this) says it is safe to turn the jars over and not water-bath can them properly? I can't seem to find that info anywhere…

    Every state extension office in the nation will tell you that the ONLY safe and approved method for preserving jams and jellies is to wath-bath the jars. If you choose to disregard that advice, it is your choice, but please do not encourage others to go against tried and true methods. Just because your family hasn't died from botulism yet doesn't mean someone else's won't – it only takes once, and it is NOT WORTH THE RISK! Especially when the solution is a simple bath in boiling water for 20 minutes…

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Leslie Peterson Hobbs

    I am going to start a discussion on Clear Jel. I need to learn!

  • http://www.facebook.com Leslie Peterson Hobbs

    I am going to start a discussion on Clear Jel. I need to learn!

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Leslie Peterson Hobbs

    How do you use the Clear Jel Lenda? For freezer or cooked jam and jellies? I am very interested in Clear Jel.

  • http://www.facebook.com Leslie Peterson Hobbs

    How do you use the Clear Jel Lenda? For freezer or cooked jam and jellies? I am very interested in Clear Jel.

  • Heather B.

    Thanks for the instructions, Jodi. If you skip the canner stage, does that change the shelf life of the jam?

    P.S. Your last step has a minor typo: should be “Isn’t this just a beautiful SIGHT?”

    • Name

      If you skip the canner stage, your jam will technically have NO shelf life. It must be water-bath canned in order to be safe and shelf-stable. You could skip the canning and store them in your fridge for a few weeks, or your freezer for a few months. But it really wouldn’t be safe to keep them on the shelf, even if the lids have sealed, because you didn’t get the internal temperature high enough for a long enough time to prevent the growth of possible mold and bacteria.

  • Heather B.

    Thanks for the instructions, Jodi. If you skip the canner stage, does that change the shelf life of the jam?

    P.S. Your last step has a minor typo: should be “Isn’t this just a beautiful SIGHT?”

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Lenda Johnson Webb

    Jodi, have you tried using the Clear Jel in the jam and jelly recipes? I love it. You use half of the sugar to the same amount of fruit and it sets just as well. Without all that sugar….yeah !!!

  • http://www.facebook.com Lenda Johnson Webb

    Jodi, have you tried using the Clear Jel in the jam and jelly recipes? I love it. You use half of the sugar to the same amount of fruit and it sets just as well. Without all that sugar….yeah !!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Lenda Johnson Webb

    Chloe, if you put a bay leaf at the bottom of your 5-6 gallon bucket, and then pour your flour on top, that keeps the bugs away. Bay leaves were used a lot in the 1800's to ward off pests. I also lay one on top just for good measure.

  • http://www.facebook.com Lenda Johnson Webb

    Chloe, if you put a bay leaf at the bottom of your 5-6 gallon bucket, and then pour your flour on top, that keeps the bugs away. Bay leaves were used a lot in the 1800's to ward off pests. I also lay one on top just for good measure.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Chloe Storm

    How do you all store 25 lbs or greater of Flour without the bugs getting in it ??? I want to stock up but afraid of those flour bugs ?? I have no room in freezer or fridge for 50lbs of flour

  • http://www.facebook.com Chloe Storm

    How do you all store 25 lbs or greater of Flour without the bugs getting in it ??? I want to stock up but afraid of those flour bugs ?? I have no room in freezer or fridge for 50lbs of flour

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Lou Perugini

    Cassie, with all due respect, if your home made bread is not coming out 10 times better than store bought, you are doing something wrong. My wife and I have it down to a science, such that it is pretty effortless to do (do all the work in our kitchen aid mixer). And everyone agrees that it is far superior to store bought. Plus it only costs us something like $0.63/ loaf to make (not inclusive of our time, but that is inclusive of energy costs).we use this recipe:http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/walter-sands-basic-white-bread-recipeand instead of regular butter, we are using powdered butter from our long term supply. We also put in the "optional" dry milk. We use this flour which is super cheap at costco: http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=10278894&whse=BD_827&Ne=4000000&eCat=BD_827|11121|11260|11919&N=4007564&Mo=8&No=5&Nr=P_CatalogName:BD_827&cat=11919&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&hierPath=11121*11260*11919*&topnav=bd

  • http://www.facebook.com Lou Perugini

    Cassie, with all due respect, if your home made bread is not coming out 10 times better than store bought, you are doing something wrong. My wife and I have it down to a science, such that it is pretty effortless to do (do all the work in our kitchen aid mixer). And everyone agrees that it is far superior to store bought. Plus it only costs us something like $0.63/ loaf to make (not inclusive of our time, but that is inclusive of energy costs).we use this recipe:http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/walter-sands-basic-white-bread-recipeand instead of regular butter, we are using powdered butter from our long term supply. We also put in the "optional" dry milk. We use this flour which is super cheap at costco: http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=10278894&whse=BD_827&Ne=4000000&eCat=BD_827|11121|11260|11919&N=4007564&Mo=8&No=5&Nr=P_CatalogName:BD_827&cat=11919&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&hierPath=11121*11260*11919*&topnav=bd

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Sue Carpenter

    I think you need to consider though how much better homemade is for you. There are none of those horrible artificial additives in homemade unlike shop bought and I have to say homemade bread tastes sooooo much better. Its also important not to let these preserving/baking skills be lost as we rely too much on commercial food.

  • http://www.facebook.com Sue Carpenter

    I think you need to consider though how much better homemade is for you. There are none of those horrible artificial additives in homemade unlike shop bought and I have to say homemade bread tastes sooooo much better. Its also important not to let these preserving/baking skills be lost as we rely too much on commercial food.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Andie Smith

    Makes me want to go out and get strawberries! Yum..

  • http://www.facebook.com Andie Smith

    Makes me want to go out and get strawberries! Yum..

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Cassie Salt

    I do have to agree that making homemade is NOT always cheaper. Especially when you take into account the time it takes to make a loaf of bread, or a batch of jam. It's nice to know that the food is fresh and made with wholesome ingredients, but sometimes that's not enough of a motivator for me to spend 2.5 hours making 2 loaves of bread that still aren't as good as store bought.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Cassie Myers Salt

    I do have to agree that making homemade is NOT always cheaper. Especially when you take into account the time it takes to make a loaf of bread, or a batch of jam. It's nice to know that the food is fresh and made with wholesome ingredients, but sometimes that's not enough of a motivator for me to spend 2.5 hours making 2 loaves of bread that still aren't as good as store bought.

  • http://www.facebook.com Cassie Myers Salt

    I do have to agree that making homemade is NOT always cheaper. Especially when you take into account the time it takes to make a loaf of bread, or a batch of jam. It's nice to know that the food is fresh and made with wholesome ingredients, but sometimes that's not enough of a motivator for me to spend 2.5 hours making 2 loaves of bread that still aren't as good as store bought.

  • http://www.facebook.com Cassie Salt

    I do have to agree that making homemade is NOT always cheaper. Especially when you take into account the time it takes to make a loaf of bread, or a batch of jam. It's nice to know that the food is fresh and made with wholesome ingredients, but sometimes that's not enough of a motivator for me to spend 2.5 hours making 2 loaves of bread that still aren't as good as store bought.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Mary Cummings Williams

    Lou, I don't know where you live and if this is feasible for you, but in many states they have farmer co-ops where you can either buy crates of fruit for SUPER cheap, or subscribe to have surplus delivered, or grow your own.Jars are often found on sites such as http://www.craigslist.com, http://www.freecycle.org, your local community reusable websites, or garage sales. Pectin, sugar and new lids will likely always have to be purchased, but rings can often be borrowed or obtained from the previous websites.Monetary costs aside, although that much sugar can't be said to be super healthy, the extra additives in storebought jam certainly are not. The taste of homemade jam is also highly superior.

  • http://www.facebook.com Mary Cummings Williams

    Lou, I don't know where you live and if this is feasible for you, but in many states they have farmer co-ops where you can either buy crates of fruit for SUPER cheap, or subscribe to have surplus delivered, or grow your own.Jars are often found on sites such as http://www.craigslist.com, http://www.freecycle.org, your local community reusable websites, or garage sales. Pectin, sugar and new lids will likely always have to be purchased, but rings can often be borrowed or obtained from the previous websites.Monetary costs aside, although that much sugar can't be said to be super healthy, the extra additives in storebought jam certainly are not. The taste of homemade jam is also highly superior.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Shelley Penner Croonen

    My thought for the jam and the bread is about knowing the ingredients that go into your food. With the bread it's also the preservatives that you will not use in homemade. My dad used to work int he berry fields that picked the berries for jam, and the processing plant where they got processed, when he was a younger man. He has told me stories of what type of berries actually get put into the jam, not to mention that slugs and other things that they put in. Now, this may have just been him and his friends being stupid, but it is enough for me to make my own.

  • http://www.facebook.com Shelley Penner Croonen

    My thought for the jam and the bread is about knowing the ingredients that go into your food. With the bread it's also the preservatives that you will not use in homemade. My dad used to work int he berry fields that picked the berries for jam, and the processing plant where they got processed, when he was a younger man. He has told me stories of what type of berries actually get put into the jam, not to mention that slugs and other things that they put in. Now, this may have just been him and his friends being stupid, but it is enough for me to make my own.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ Lou Perugini

    I have to ask, what are the economics of making jam at home? Do you actually save any money over store bought? I found with bread making, that I needed to buy flour and yeast in bulk for the economics to work. Are there any tricks to Jam making for getting the economics right? A quick scan of local prices for stuff like jars, pectin, sugar, etc., would seem to indicate that it would cost me around $3/jar for home made. I know the the price of the jars cam be amortized over several years/seasons, but it still looks to me like it may be cheaper to by jam at the megamart, if i am not raising my own berries. Any thoughts or suggestions?

  • http://www.facebook.com Lou Perugini

    I have to ask, what are the economics of making jam at home? Do you actually save any money over store bought? I found with bread making, that I needed to buy flour and yeast in bulk for the economics to work. Are there any tricks to Jam making for getting the economics right? A quick scan of local prices for stuff like jars, pectin, sugar, etc., would seem to indicate that it would cost me around $3/jar for home made. I know the the price of the jars cam be amortized over several years/seasons, but it still looks to me like it may be cheaper to by jam at the megamart, if i am not raising my own berries. Any thoughts or suggestions?

  • http://www.mamasheartblog.com/ sue

    There are two things that I like to do when making jam which might help someone.

    1) Use Dutch Gel. It’s the Amish version of pectin, comes in bulk (handy for food storage, no?) and is FAR cheaper than the boxes at the grocery store. You can typically find it at an Amish or Mennonite market in the country or online. :)

    2) Once the hot jars with jam are lidded & ringed, I turn them upside down for 5 minutes. Then I flip them right side up again – and let the seal work. The USDA says this is as safe and effective as water-bath canning jams and jellies and I have never had it fail yet. :)

    Last year, we made strawberry-serviceberry jam (we have a serviceberry tree in the backyard) and the tree is blooming again now. Our son looked at it and said, “I can’t WAIT for those berries – and jam-making again!” :)

    • Name

      Could you please post your source where the USDA (which actually has no authority over home canning, so I can’t imagine they would even publish anything about this) says it is safe to turn the jars over and not water-bath can them properly? I can’t seem to find that info anywhere…

      Every state extension office in the nation will tell you that the ONLY safe and approved method for preserving jams and jellies is to wath-bath the jars. If you choose to disregard that advice, it is your choice, but please do not encourage others to go against tried and true methods. Just because your family hasn’t died from botulism yet doesn’t mean someone else’s won’t – it only takes once, and it is NOT WORTH THE RISK! Especially when the solution is a simple bath in boiling water for 20 minutes…

      • http://www.mamasheartblog.com sue

        Dear Person Who Is Nameless,

        I wish you’d used your name! It makes it seem like you’re posting a hit-and-run comment. :

        While the USDA isn’t officially “in charge” of home canning, they do have reach through the university extension offices all over the US. And as evidenced by your further comments, they do have opinions about home canning.

        When I started canning, some 15 yrs ago, there was no internet, no multiple places to check information. The inversion-method that I mentioned was included in a package of Ball canning jam jars as an acceptable method, per the USDA. I had no reason to doubt any of that information. The USDA also used to advocate no water-bath canning for jam and sealing with hot paraffin, and also removing any mould growth from the jam and consuming the rest. They have since changed their collective minds on the hot paraffin and the mould-scraping, and based on one site I saw, they have also changed their minds on inversion of jam, on the *potential* of burns, wasted jam, etc. They didn’t indicate problems with inverted jam jars & lids with regard to botulism, as if you’ve sterilized your jars, lids, and used boiling jam there is no chance for the botulinum toxin to survive. They did indicate that for “long-term storage,” this inverted jam has a shorter shelf-life, but our jam never lasts more than 15 months, at the most – because we eat it. One of the things that makes jam “safe” for this method (and you’ll note I never said it was for other types of canning) is the immense amount of sugar in the jam – between acid in the fruit and sugar added, jam is considered “safe” from botulism, in general.

        You can, of course, do whatever you’d like with your home canning and produce. While it might not be the currently favoured-method of canning jam, it’s not dangerous and it does work.

  • http://www.mamasheartblog.com/ sue

    There are two things that I like to do when making jam which might help someone.

    1) Use Dutch Gel. It's the Amish version of pectin, comes in bulk (handy for food storage, no?) and is FAR cheaper than the boxes at the grocery store. You can typically find it at an Amish or Mennonite market in the country or online. :)

    2) Once the hot jars with jam are lidded & ringed, I turn them upside down for 5 minutes. Then I flip them right side up again – and let the seal work. The USDA says this is as safe and effective as water-bath canning jams and jellies and I have never had it fail yet. :)

    Last year, we made strawberry-serviceberry jam (we have a serviceberry tree in the backyard) and the tree is blooming again now. Our son looked at it and said, “I can't WAIT for those berries – and jam-making again!” :)

  • http://www.mamasheartblog.com/ sue

    I have purchased “freeze or can” jars from Ball, but I found that if you freeze the jars and then want to use them (later) in a water-bath canning process, they break while you're trying to can them. I consistently had the bottom of the jars “break off” – there was a ring of cracked glass at the bottom & it was only on the jars that had been previously used for freezing. :(

    Maybe my results aren't typical, but I found it completely annoying. :

  • Anonymous

    I love making strawberry jam! I only top the berries and cut them into two-four chunks. I mash them a bit as they are cooking and end up with a nice, fruity-chunky jam in a short time.

  • Morning Sunshine

    couple of things I would like to add. I had never boiled my jars either until one year after I had jammed the last of the berries one August. A few weeks later, the jars were bulging and bad. I have been a believer ever since.
    I would also like to recommend something called pomona pectin (http://www.pomonapectin.com/) which allows you to use any kind of sweetener you want to your jam, even honey. It has an added step, but it is very easy, and with a low-sugar jam you really taste the fruit so much more, and not the sugar. I did not know how much I would like it until I tried jam with lower sugar.
    I tried the regular low-sugar pectin that Andrea recommended, and my jams never “set.” they tasted yummy (again like the fruit, not the sugar), but were very runny, like a very thick syrup. I do not have that problem with pomona.
    If you do use a low-sugar pectin, be aware that not only does it become off-color, it will also mold a lot quicker since there is not enough sugar to inhibit its growth. This means you have to eat it faster :)

  • mommaofmany

    I love making strawberry jam! I only top the berries and cut them into two-four chunks. I mash them a bit as they are cooking and end up with a nice, fruity-chunky jam in a short time.

  • Anonymous

    I’ve been wanting to make jam, so this makes it look very easy! Thank you. With the way you made it, can the jars be stored in the freezer?

    • http://www.mamasheartblog.com/ sue

      I have purchased “freeze or can” jars from Ball, but I found that if you freeze the jars and then want to use them (later) in a water-bath canning process, they break while you’re trying to can them. I consistently had the bottom of the jars “break off” – there was a ring of cracked glass at the bottom & it was only on the jars that had been previously used for freezing. :(

      Maybe my results aren’t typical, but I found it completely annoying. :

  • http://www.gettingfinancesdone.com/ Sam the budgeting guy

    You should have been listening to this song titled “strawberry jam” while you did it (http://www.rhapsody.com/michelle-shocked). It’s one of my favorite songs (I should be the 6th song in the list). I need to get Emily making some Jam this summer.

  • bambers

    I've been wanting to make jam, so this makes it look very easy! Thank you. With the way you made it, can the jars be stored in the freezer?

  • andrea

    I was also scared to make jam at first. A few years ago I took the plunge and haven’t bought jam at the store since.
    At my mom’s suggestion I tried out the low-sugar pectin. We use only 4 cups of sugar (it has directions for sugar free (splenda) jam as well). It still sets up great and tastes super sweet. It costs about the same and you save tons of calories by cutting down the sugar. It does tend to brown a little with time, so we like to add a “fruit fresh” to it, or even better decrease the strawberries a little and add in raspberries instead to get a great color and taste.
    I’ve heard that the water bath processing can add to your shelf life, so if you make a lot of jam you may want to keep that step.

  • andrea

    I was also scared to make jam at first. A few years ago I took the plunge and haven't bought jam at the store since.
    At my mom's suggestion I tried out the low-sugar pectin. We use only 4 cups of sugar (it has directions for sugar free (splenda) jam as well). It still sets up great and tastes super sweet. It costs about the same and you save tons of calories by cutting down the sugar. It does tend to brown a little with time, so we like to add a “fruit fresh” to it, or even better decrease the strawberries a little and add in raspberries instead to get a great color and taste.
    I've heard that the water bath processing can add to your shelf life, so if you make a lot of jam you may want to keep that step.