One Second After: Storing Non-Food Items and Medications

This is the seventh topic for our Group Book Discussion of the novel One Second After. To return to the main discussion page click here.

In the story, one of the most tragic situations was the main character’s daughter had Type 1 diabetes and required insulin. The supply was short and they ran out before more could be located or shipped in. While some health issues simply could not be treated, others could have been managed much better were there proper supplies on hand. Some other thoughts mentioned in the book are the logistics of feminine hygiene products, personal hygiene in general, and the health risks associated with the lack of hygiene.

QUESTIONS TO PONDER

  • What medical conditions do you have that would be affected by no new medicine?
  • How can you store extra medicine?
  • What type of natural remedies could be learned to replace modern medicines that will not be available once supplies run out?
  • What can you do TODAY to be healthier thus avoiding the need for medical intervention?
  • What other non-food items will you need?
  • Do you have items that can help you stay clean, and help kill germs that could cause illness?
  • What plans do you have in place for proper sanitation?
  • Do you have necessary tools, instructions, and items needed for building and living more primitively?

DISCUSS

In our comments section below, ask questions, discuss your thoughts on this topic, and these questions. We will be covering a lot of the other issues over the next three days, so to keep it organized please stick with this topic.

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  • wtmtnfox

    Essential oils are a great “natural” health alternative to treat many medical conditions.  They are also easy to store.  Of course, now is the time to educate yourself and try them out to see if you can replace your traditional prescriptions with specific oils.  My family has been able to get off cholestral medicines, hormone replacement meds, high blood pressure meds, sleeping aids, etc…Many single oils and blends have natural antibiotic, antiviral and antiseptic properties that would be life savers.  I personally use doTerra products, but know there are other good ones out there. You can also use many oils to flavor food storage items.

  • Kym

    I just wanted to remind those who have an emergency stash of medication, please make sure you are rotating this medication regularly, since medications do expire! The last thing you want is to be in an emergency situation and realize your emergency stash of medication is expired!! (I try to rotate mine each time I get a refill)

  • Terry

    I do everything I possibly can to avoid pharmaceutical medications, but have a 25-year-old daughter that is on a high dose of Lithium (and something else I can’t remember the name of) for severe Bi-Polar Disorder. As a controlled substance, I am terrified as to what will happen should she be unable to obtain it and have to go off of it ‘cold turkey’. I doubt she would survive. Does anyone have any idea as to what we should do about this frightening reality?

    • Victoriansecret

      Have her prescriptions filled a week or so earlier so you can build up a supply.

      Also research alternative methods and natural remedies. Start to keep these supplies on hand.

      Hopefully others will return and help you out.

  • TK

    Our elders are on many meds, and sadly as in the book may not live long without them. Have been trying to at least have a three month supply on hand. Still the inevitable is that we will loose loved ones in a prolonged situation. Trying to keep the family up on all dental and stay healthy. Need to look more into natural medicines for options.

    Have non-food stored for short term, but what to do in long term for hygiene? Some things like running out of TP… Families use to use newspaper, corncobs and catalogs for TP, but in an EMP situation availability could be a challenge and besides catalogs now have glossy pages that wouldn’t be useful. A bucket of water with each having personal rags? How do you keep sanitary with those? Missionary friends in Sandakan only have buckets of water for toilet needs. Things to ponder.

  • TK

    Our elders are on many meds, and sadly as in the book may not live long without them. Have been trying to at least have a three month supply on hand. Still the inevitable is that we will loose loved ones in a prolonged situation. Trying to keep the family up on all dental and stay healthy. Need to look more into natural medicines for options.

    Have non-food stored for short term, but what to do in long term for hygiene? Some things like running out of TP… Families use to use newspaper, corncobs and catalogs for TP, but in an EMP situation availability could be a challenge and besides catalogs now have glossy pages that wouldn’t be useful. A bucket of water with each having personal rags? How do you keep sanitary with those? Missionary friends in Sandakan only have buckets of water for toilet needs. Things to ponder.

  • Sharon

    A pot in a pot solar refrigerator called a zeer would keep insulin or medicine cool if you have supplies on hand that needs to keep cool.

  • Sharon

    The pot in a pot refrigerator or zeer would keep insulin, milk for a baby or medicine cool. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfKgOpJc7Ps

  • well, for myself, I am on a med that does 2 jobs, first helps my borderline high blood pressure, and second helps me to not have migraines. Unfortunately if I stop it cold turkey I could have a heart attack. So, I have stored up a 4 month supply and am still trying to get more. I also am storing extra gelatin capsules so that if I have to wean myself from it, I can slowly do that by taking a portion of the powder out of the original capsule and slowly weaning myself off of it. My DH has a larger problem. He is type 2 diabetic, has high blood pressure, high cholesterol and really bad reflux. He also has sleep apnea. We got a solar panel and deep cycle gel battery and can run the cpap for 4 days on a charge assuming the wiring isn’t fried, otherwise he will have to sleep sitting up. The type 2 diabetes will get better if he has a better diet which living off of food storage he would (I could finally get him to give up all that junk food) and loses weight and exercises more, (all of which would happen naturally in a survival situation) but he is the type that waits until he is almost a week out of meds before refilling them. Yes, we have talked about it, but no he refuses to ask the DR to write him an extra 3 month script in case of emergencies.
    Other than that, we have some herbals stored up and a green house so I can grow more even in winter, we have fish biotics stored, sutures, crazy glue, temporary dental kits, and even some of those potassium pills that are supposed to be good if exposed to radiation.
    I have extra soaps, shampoos, canning supplies, 2 grey water barrels, 3 water barrels of stored drinking water and 2 filters for water. I live around several lakes.
    I don’t have alot of know how but am trying to learn and printing off reference stuff.
    For the whole sanitation thing, we are on septic, so I hope to use the grey water to flush. We have some hand cleaners, I have cloths for toilet papering, and will boil laundry outside on the fire. We have never been the type though that have to have everything sterile in the house, so hopefully we will have soe immunity to some of the dirt issues, and can boil/sterilize everything needed to be OK. Oh and I have stored vitamins for the family which we use and rotate thru.

  • Anonymous

    i have a genral question for everyone here. what would you store (non-medicinal) that you could use later for trade or use? personally, as i’ve stated before, i would store dental hygiene kits.
    the kits would include a toothbrush, a toothpaste;minimally. then first extension would include dental floss. second extension would include dental pic/dental mirror.
    another would be baking soda and vinegar.

    • Rise’

      While I have no kids I plan to store some child-care items. I also plan to store fabrics and patterns in a variety of sizes so I can make children’s clothing. Since I don’t have a non-electric machine I will sew them by hand. I will also store fleece for blankets.

      Also – don’t forget to stock items for the comfort and care of Fido… flea and tick medications/shampoos/sprays, heartworm medication, etc.

  • J – newbie

    Thanks for including specific web sites that you have checked out re accuracy! It will very helpful when I really get into research aspects of thse categories of emergency.

  • J – newbie

    Me again :-). Ever since reading the book, Insulin has been on my mind. Here’s an excerpt from endocrineweb.com:

    The first successful insulin preparations came from cows (and later pigs). The pancreatic islets and the insulin protein contained within them were isolated from animals slaughtered for food in a similar but more complex fashion than was used by our doctor and med-student duo [Banting & Best]. The bovine (cow) and porcine (pig) insulin were purified, bottled, and sold. Bovine and porcine insulin worked very well (and still do!) for the vast majority of patients, but some could develop an allergy or other types of reactions to the foreign protein (a foreign protein is a protein which is not native to humans). In the 1980’s technology had advanced to the point where we could make human insulin. [REST OF PARAGRAPH NOT COPIED].

    Upshot = Anyone who has diabetes or even thinks it might become an issue (based on family history) or simply chooses to take preventive action can research and learn the “how to” of the original method! Would have to add microscope and ‘whatever’ to the storage list but **it is feasible** and thus not necessary for someone to die of it.

    You know, we’re actually very, very lucky to be living when we do. The ‘Net makes it possible to discuss and **learn about** so much that may – or does – impact our lives. As fast as a question can be asked, the ‘Net provides answers, both historic (i.e. what previous generations did and learned), the very latest, and what the future could hold … always, of course, with the proviso to ‘check source’ :-).

    • Npp1966

      not bad idea to learn how to do the things our ancestors did to survive. the biggie with the insulin is you have to have access to the animals. for those people living in cities even small ones there may not be any farm animals near you. it is nice that the internet makes it so much easier to research.

    • Cherlynn

      I’ve researched this topic of Bovine insulin and asked my experts if in a severe crisis like major earthquake or EMP attack if there was any way insulin could be produced and each and every one said no it would take years of work to be able to reproduce a working insulin.

      • Midnightmom

        The recombinant/genetically modified kind, maybe. But the original animal based product shouldn’t be that difficult to manufacture.

  • Anonymous

    Duh I forgot candles, lamp fuel, wicks and blocks of wax to make more candles as needed.

    • You can make candles out of animal fat, as well. Do a search for tallow candle making and give it a try. They don’t burn as long as wax, but fat may be more readily available.

      • Anonymous

        I use all animal fat to make soaps! Sure would hate to have to share to make candles too!

      • Bon_32

        Don’t forget beeswax!

  • Npp1966

    according to yankee prepper you can purchase pool shock (he got his from wal mart 5lb for 10.00) and as long as the active ingredient is calcium hypochlorite you can make your own bleach. Takes very little powder and will keep indefinitely. Has you tube video on many things.

  • J – newbie

    Lots of thoughts/ideas but still too much at the beginning of preparation to easily list ‘the plan’. I’ve copied the questions into folder set up for Sanitation/Medical and will use them as one of my guides. Also avidly reading everyone’s comments and plan to copy this whole section into folder. There is already a ton of info in folder, but sure need to distill it down to what works and is practical for us.
    Have on hand a couple of books about herbal treatments for long list of medical conditions. My seed supply includes some that are indicated in the books but far, far from finished. Brian, thank you for identifying the book re Modern Medicine – I will do a ‘Net search of the title & download … then print out!
    Personally in good health, close-by-family have some medical problems. Not sure if herbal treatments would work but will prepared on the premise that they will. At all times, family has a 3-month emergency supply with none have a short shelf list … but need to confirm that!
    Sanitation will include scoop-able version of kitty litter, so have to get at least a few bags (no cats in residence). Also hope it will be a “common storage” item if other tenants agree to set up building-wide plan. IMHO it will work very well in the double-garbage-bags-in-toilet-bowl suggested method when lose water or sewer. It also should make it easier to remove wastes (scoop + rubber gloves for safety) to another, larger container.

    • Npp1966

      like your idea on kitty litter for toileting.

      • Cherlynn

        don’t forget many toilets may still be workable. I know we will be able to just pour water into the bowl and flush and let it go into our lagoon. But of course we’ll have to hike up and down the hill to get the water.

  • Medical Conditions – N/A and we are very blessed. An extra couple of sets of eyeglasses are the most we have to concern with.

    Medical Storage – We actually take an approach of have multiple kits set up based on where they are to be used: Automobile, Home, Get Home Bag (GHB), Bug Out Bag (BOB), etc.

    Modern Medicine – There is a great book called “When There Is No Doctor” we have both downloaded (It’s Free) and purchased in hard copy in the event of an EMP. We’re not doctors or nurses, but I am willing and able to learn. We do have all of the essentials or basic elements for first aid covered.

    Physical Health and Well-being – Our family is active and always ensuring we are eating healthily and within reason for our diet. The Navy SEAL’s have a saying – “You can never be too fast or too strong.” Same applies here and it is something you just have to keep working at for your entire life. Regular health checks, physicals, etc. All are done annually.

    Non-Food Related – We have extra sanitation, water, filtration, utensil/cutlery, personal hygiene. I try real hard to always have between 2 and 3 extra of what we use regularly.

    Hygiene – In all of our first aid kits and what we use to keep ourselves clean, we are well stocked. Baby Wipes are a great thing to have and a $15 box goes a super long way from the local Sam’s or Costco. Toothpaste, floss, toothbrushes, etc. All are stocked in bulk. Bottom line though, you are either the type of person who is clean or you’re not. An EMP isn’t going to change your hygiene… I would like to make a long cable and possible retrofit kit for our laundry machines to run off the generator though, but there are other solutions too. Have too research more..

    Sanitation – We have a bucket kit with enzymes for breaking it down over time. And, I would ensure it is cleaned out on cycle to keep us healthy as is possible. These aren’t perfect solutions, but they would do the trick if you can’t go outdoors or if it’s too cold outside or dangerous. An outhouse could be a dangerous place in the wrong setting or social decline.

    Primitive Living – I don’t think many people can answer yes to this question, but I do have a list of things to have if we wanted to retrofit our living today to accommodate that lifestyle. It’s just a matter of picking them up one at a time. For the general construction, we’re taken care of. For the primitive living in the home, I’d like to pick up a stove/heating unit that is extra for now. A portable solar unit (high enough wattage is the key, though) would be nice to power cordless tools and recharge what is using our Duracell Portable PowerPack.

    I guess I would summarize a lot of this in that there are lists to be put together and a lot of prioritizing required. We’ve been doing this for a while and some expensive items and niceties now remain on the list. It’s always a work in progress…

    • J – newbie

      Brian, I followed up and did ‘Net search for the book you mentioned. Thank you.

      Wow! As well as “Where There Is No Doctor”, the publisher’s web site has a bunch of other publications … all available for free download. Haven’t read any of them, but seems worth a second visit to check them out.

      Here’s the web site if anyone else is interested:
      http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php#wtnd

  • Here’s a 4-H site that has instructions for turning one of the older electric sewing machines into a non-electric one. I’ve held onto the link so I could turn my old Singer 301a into one if I had to. http://4-h.wsu.edu/clothing/4HGoGreenActitivity.pdf

    As for me, the book really brought to light that I need to look into alternative healthcare things and have some handy reference manuals just in case. I read on another forum that horse & fish antibiotics are the same as human ABs, but can be bought and stored OTC. Would have to google it to find out what specific named ones were what, but interesting info to file in my brain anyway. The biggest eye-opener in the book was the sanitation problem. It really cycled numerous times through the novel. I store nitrile and latex gloves, but also bleach (which does have to be rotated) & vinegar. We also have a porta potty that I bought a big bottle of extra chems for.

    Mostly, I just need to quit being lazy on printing interesting tidbits of info out instead of just bookmarking them, and get it done and in a binder. 🙂

  • Cherlynn

    * What medical conditions do you have that would be affected by no new medicine?
    We have 3 of us with allergies and severe asthma. I’ve been searching the herbal legacy/ Dr christopher websites ( http://www.christopherwebsites.com/ ) to learn all I can to help with any problems we might hit. have tried several of them out and have learned what works and what doesn’t and how to make them on our own. We have a possible type 2 diabetic thing that could happen but due to my liver problem we have changed our diet and so far it has prevented that problem in our home.

    * How can you store extra medicine?
    We have a 6 month supply on hand and know how to use and are growing herbal substitutes.

    * What type of natural remedies could be learned to replace modern medicines that will not be available once supplies run out? I have printed out info for everything I have found at the http://www.christopherwebsites.com/ website. I’m only worried about those with type 1 diabetes now and have not found any substitute for the insulin they are very much dependent on. Study up now and try things out so if you have to you can handle things!

    * What can you do TODAY to be healthier thus avoiding the need for medical intervention?

    Change your diet to whole grains and real whole foods. Exercise!

    * What other non-food items will you need?
    Made up kits with peri bottles and sponges/ clothes to replace toilet paper. Made our laundry kit and have tons of soap/ washing soda and borax stored so we can make our own laundry soap which we already use 100%. Keep buying bar rags, ect in bulk to replace our paper towels. Learning make our own soap & cleaning supplies. We kept track of all our purchases over a 3 month period– it was an eye opening event! See what you are using and how to replace it in a long term situation! We have walls full of material to make our clothes, ect.

    * Do you have items that can help you stay clean, and help kill germs that could cause illness?
    Yes! We have our emergency bucket with sanitation items to get us started and then we have our book to tell us how to make our own cleaners, ect

    * What plans do you have in place for proper sanitation?
    Lana Richards has lots of kits you can buy or make your own and explains why you need each item! http://www.emergencyhelps.com/Emergency_Helps/Products.html

    * Do you have necessary tools, instructions, and items needed for building and living more primitively?

    Yes! My Amish neighbors have been a great help to teach us so many things and help us get what we needed! Still wanting to get the haying equipment so we don’t have to do hay by hand, use the horses instead. got some great saws for cutting trees and and then cutting them into boards. Need to lay in more kegs of nails, ect though.

  • CoffeeHeidi

    * What medical conditions do you have that would be affected by no new medicine?
    Me: high blood pressure Husband:acid reflux, allergies (to a ton of things,) others Child: asthma though it’s not horrible and seasonal allergies

    * How can you store extra medicine?
    Unlike others, we can’t get a prescription for 3 months of our meds from our doctor and husband has a bad habit of not getting refills until he’s out. I do try to stock extra OTC meds though I need much more as it seems we’re always going through our supplies every time we’re sick. I try to keep us well stocked on vitamins as well, but they can be expensive.

    * What type of natural remedies could be learned to replace modern medicines that will not be available once supplies run out?
    No clue. It’s one of the things I have to read up on.

    * What can you do TODAY to be healthier thus avoiding the need for medical intervention?
    Loosing weight and eating better would solve a lot of husband and my own health problems.

    * What other non-food items will you need?
    We’re adding to our stores of basic toiletries, first aid supplies, and feminine sanitation products including making my own from cloth for when the disposables run out. We’re also stocking multiple cooking, fuel, heat, & lighting sources, extra clothing including undergarments, blankets/quilts, etc.

    * Do you have items that can help you stay clean, and help kill germs that could cause illness?
    Multiple. I put my list below with the other question.

    * What plans do you have in place for proper sanitation?
    Our sewage line broke and flooded our basement last Christmas during a bad snow storm. It became quickly obvious what we needed and now stock – a portable toilet (bucket with toilet lid,) “doody bags,” extra enzymes & kitty litter to absorb some of the mess & odor, tons of toilet paper, paper towels, baby wipes, Clorox disinfecting wipes, garbage bags, a couple of shovels, disposable latex-like gloves, bleach, powdered cleaner, white vinegar, and other things.

    * Do you have necessary tools, instructions, and items needed for building and living more primitively?
    I have books with instructions on how to build composting toilets, out houses, living primitively, etc. As part of our homeschooling history lessons and for preparedness, we’ve watched the PBS “Frontier House” and “1900 House” among others, including all the behind-the-scenes parts in order to see how our ancestors handled these problems. I still have a lot to learn, but think we’re better off than many.

  • JULIE- Food Storage Made Easy

    This book made me think about staying as healthy as possible to avoid certain illnesses. I know however, some are inevitable, and hope to learn more about natural remedies as well.

  • Prepared Teacher

    * What medical conditions do you have that would be affected by no new medicine? None at this time. Thank goodness

    * How can you store extra medicine? Over the counter I am buying extras over time. children’s Tylenol/Advil ( generic kinds are cheaper), regular Tylenol/Advil or Excedrin ( which ever is cheapest or on sale), Nyquil and Dayquil, Halls for the throat, biofreeze (ben gay stuff), childrens mentholoptol (ben gay), cough syrup for kids and adults.

    * What type of natural remedies could be learned to replace modern medicines that will not be available once supplies run out?I need to get a few books on this ( unprepared at this time).

    * What can you do TODAY to be healthier thus avoiding the need for medical intervention? Excersize and eat correctly, limit the fast food and sugary food

    * What other non-food items will you need? basic necessities ( tooth paste ( baking soda and peroxide), shampoo ( kids and adults), spare tooth and hair combs, shower gel or bar soap, wash cloths, razors, cotton balls and q-tips, nail polish ( barginer, and makes you feel pretty to lift spirit), sun screen (important for outdoor work or travel), lip balm, body lotion ( regular and smelly ones), bug spray, aloe vera gel, light bulbs, batteries, dish soap ( or home made supplies) laundry stuff ( home made supplies, borax, and fels naptha), toilet paper ( very improtant), alcohol ( the kind you use to clean not to drink thats another area), peroxide, feminine hygene products ( another bargining item), and condoms ( people will still have fun because it reduces stress) and head bands/ bandanas/ rubber bands/ booby pins ( to keep hair up looking nice when it is dirty…. I know i am missing stuff but at this time i am lazy and do not want to check my bathroom to see what i missed.

    * Do you have items that can help you stay clean, and help kill germs that could cause illness? Yes, i have many bars of soap, hand soap ( 4 large bottles), shampoo ( at least 13 16oz, and 2 large ( costco shampoos and conditioners), hand sanitizer ( 2 large bottles), alcohol and peroxide ( 2-3 bottles). I am getting more sanitizer because with a ration of water i am not wasting it on hands. I have also heard ( but haven’t got or made) waterless shampoo.

    * What plans do you have in place for proper sanitation? need to buy black outdoor trash bags ( fecies, trash,body bags (god forbid) may need to build some sort of out house/ toilet bucket ( for travel) ( need to get a book on this or information) and luckily our back yard is nice size so out house will be away from house and water line ( if it comes on). May need to have alturnative place for trash since there will be no sanitation department for a while ( use as much as you can for compost pile, and recycle as much as we can to eliminate trash products).

    * Do you have necessary tools, instructions, and items needed for building and living more primitively?
    I am working on that ( i have a few books on farming and old ways of living, looking and printing off recepis of using food storage, holding on to fabric and trying to keep all scraps of fabric, making sure to have patterns and material for clothing and looking for an old sewing machine minus the electricity) we have tools and such because we do our yard and go camping.

    Will need to stock more wood for the fire place and for cooking out doors or in the fire place.
    Wish and hope in the future to have solar stuff, and hand wheat grinder..
    I hope this may help others who are not sure what they are missing in their journey to being prepared…..

  • Rise’

    Husband – high BP & Cholesterol; me – a couple automimmune diseases for which I take Plaquenil, Meloxicam, and several other supportive medications. My daughter is my biggest concern who has a rare brain disease. When she is stable things are okay, when not she needs lots of medications. We have some extras but her pain meds are highly controlled substances and you just can’t get extras. So, I am learning what alternative medicines might help her. Since her disease is autoimmune mediated the substances I find to help her can also help me. Losing weight would go a long way in helping all of us.

    I grow several herbs… lavendar, rosemary, oregano, thyme, sage, chamomile, and basil. I am just learning what great properties oregano has. Lavendar and chamomile are good if for nothing else helping to ease stress.

    I have just started my hygiene storage – soap, anti-bac, bandaids, toothpast, TP, “diaper wipes”, waterless face cleaner, peroxide, deoderant, ibuprofen, vitamin e cream to keep the skin healthy – the bodie’s first line of defense. It will be important to prevent germs from entering into cracked, dry skin. I have a long way to go here… the list goes on and on.

    I have been buying books right and left. There is so much to absorb. One thing I’d like to get done is a small “library reference”… sort of like an old card catalog in the library so I don’t waste time looking through books trying to find what I’m looking for when I’m under the gun.

    • Bon_32

      I love the idea of a “library reference” as I have MANY books with tons of info and it takes me forever to find what I am looking for.

  • Npp1966

    1. kids and hubby don’t take medications other than when they have colds or headaches I’m type II diabetic maintaining levels with diet and pills which would probably benefit me eating from storage as there would be no processed foods in my diet. Also on a blood pressure pill to help protect kidneys over the long haul with diabetes. Which my doctor couldn’t believed helped with hormonal migraines can anyone say hurry menopause and be done with it. On cholestrol pill but won’t miss that one and the biggie b12 weekly injections i give myself. I’ve looked at alternative ways to get the b12 absorbed and will try them soon. currently I’m cutting my shots to every other week and will see what my values are at when i go in 3 months for diabetic eval. I went one full month without them and dropped over 600 points.
    2 storing medicines— I’ve been taking roughly 4 pills of each one out per month and sitting them aside for emergencies. this was what was recommended in diabetic education to build up an emergency stash for hurricanes. I had a small stash enough for 3 weeks or so now I’m thinking longer term. My sister told me of an interview she heard from a retired Merck pharmaceatical dr .. OTC medicines and most all medicines in general are good for 5 – 10 years so I’m not as worried about storing up extra.
    3. have looked up a few natural remedies for things like sore throats i tend to get bad ones but if I start early I have good luck usnig natural things or things I have in house. My kids and hubby are more skeptical. Let’s face it a lot of the old wives tales worked back in the day and would work today
    4. Lose weight, exercise more, eat less processed foods get a handle on emotional overeating
    5. Non food items related to health band aids alcohol, peroxide, antibiotic ointments, iodine, betadine, elastic bandages, toothe paste, floss, extra toothebrushes, tylenol, cold medicines all types and kinds, wipes, sanitizers, soaps, lotions, aloe vera, travel sewing kit ( for stitches)
    vitamins / supplements, and the list goes on
    6. have started on the above mentioned lists. If your storing soap do you know how much you will use in one month? shampoo? toothepaste? for example i have short hair and I know an 18 bottle of shampoo and an 18 oz bottle of conditioner will last me 3 1/2 months using daily with an occaisonal extra shower thrown in, a bar of 3 oz soap almost 2 months. My hubby likes the 3 in 1 body wash and this lasts him 1 3/4 roughly. The kids are the ones to watch for overuse of hygiene items.
    7. bleach, sanitizer, vinegar, plan to stock up on some ammonum
    8. have portable toilet, might be a good idea to dig an outhouse type hole instead in which case would be a good idea to stock up on lime as well. Food for thought on that one haven’t had to use an out house in many years. try to keep hands washed as much as possible and bodies clean. would like to pick up some dimotaceous earth to help with indoor pest, that will likely overrun us in the florida eat (roaches, fleas, ants, god forbid bed bugs or lice).
    9. tools to use to build to live more primitively…. not really an axe, a couple of hand saws, hammers most everything else is powered. Not particular the best builder but could be creative if I had the wood and some tools. would have to rely on main structure of house for shelter

  • anon

    My daughter (almost 1 year old) has a dependence on a medication, to the point where if she were to drop off of it without proper weaning, it would likely be fatal. This has always scared me. I cannot procure more than a month’s supply of this medication at a time, as it can also be abused. If we were to have any type of emergency, I think I would walk to our pharmacy (nearby) and beg the pharmacists (who know me pretty well as a result of me refilling my daughter’s prescription each month) to give me enough to either last the duration of the emergency, or enough to safely wean my daughter, whichever was less (depending on her age, safe weaning may or may not be possible). This has been a fear of mine for the past 11 months, though. If anyone has better solutions/suggestions, though, I would greatly appreciate them.

    • J – newbie

      Especially since the pharmacy is within walking distance and you’re a known customer …
      I wonder if your pharmacist would agree to holding a 3 or 6 months supply of your daughter’s medication “on your behalf” … paid for by you already and locked into some sort of home safe type box (that you provide) and that they keep in an unobtrusive location. That way there would be no issue about possible abuse BUT it would be there when you need it *and* it would be yours already!! so not at the mercy of any rationing they might instigate in an emergency.

      Yep – it does sound like a crazy suggestion, but the worst that can happen is they so ‘No’ … then again, they might actually understand your concern and hold at least a few months’ worth.

  • Melissa

    I’m just going to answer the questions. I know it’s not really a discussion that way but…

    What medical conditions do you have that would be affected by no new medicine? We do have allergies in our family that causes some pretty serious asthma attacks and some very bad eczema. I feel there is a high risk of infection with the eczema. I am starting to stock up on neosporin and cortizone for eczema. The asthma, we will just try to get extra scripts and rotate. I will also keep hot chocolate mix & tea on hand since warm drinks do seem to help.
    How can you store extra medicine? Will just have to rotate, no real way to keep it out of the heat down here to help it last longer.

    What type of natural remedies could be learned to replace modern medicines that will not be available once supplies run out? Answered above with the hot/warm drinks
    What can you do TODAY to be healthier thus avoiding the need for medical intervention? Nothing that can really be done any different except for allergy shots (which we are doing for one child)
    What other non-food items will you need? Sanitary napkins and such. I have been stocking up on that. Matches and/or other fire starters. coats, extra shoes, band aids..this list can just go on and on.
    Do you have items that can help you stay clean, and help kill germs that could cause illness? Hand sanitizer and alcohol, baby wipes, anti-bacterial wipes. SOAP!

    What plans do you have in place for proper sanitation? My thoughts on this is to dig an outhouse and have plenty of toilet paper on hand. Bury items that can’t be recycled, composted or burned.

    Do you have necessary tools, instructions, and items needed for building and living more primitively? Not yet. Working on that too. One step at a time but kind of in a hurry.

    • This may sound kinda weird at first, but some of the dermatologists I used to visit, would recommend plain Crisco for eczema. Most of eczema is about applying a barrier to keep moisture in. For obvious reasons, don’t use the butter flavored. 🙂 But, as a last resort storage item, Crisco is cheap, has a decent shelf life and would work well.

    • This may sound kinda weird at first, but some of the dermatologists I used to visit, would recommend plain Crisco for eczema. Most of eczema is about applying a barrier to keep moisture in. For obvious reasons, don’t use the butter flavored. 🙂 But, as a last resort storage item, Crisco is cheap, has a decent shelf life and would work well.

      • Beverly

        Many years ago hospitals did use Crisco on new born baby’s,

  • Hntersmom

    .i have a heart arythmmia and take 1 med daily. i panic over this. i need to talk to my doctor and ask what i need to do to wean myself off the med just in case so i dont ave to go cold turkey. my son has GERD but i can control it with diet

    .i need to make sure i have plenty of first aid stuff(neosproin, alcohol, peroxide) and stuff like tylenol and triaminic. the bigger 2 can take adult meds but i still have a 3 yo so id have to have the children versions for her. vitamins are another thing.,

    i have been exercising in an effort to lose weight and hopefully not be dependent on the heart med. the kids and hubby are in good health overall too.

    i do have a good supply of toothpaste, shampoo, razors, and soap. i even have packs of baby wipes even though the youngest has been trained for months. i need stuff like feminine products(2 of us with that problem now, uck), alcohol, hand saniter, and peroxide. oh and bleach. i also need a better supply of tp.

    • J – newbie

      Just so you know and may want to keep seeds to grow:
      Per US American Heart Association: DIGITALIS (also known as digoxin and digitoxin). It’s a drug that strengthens the contraction of the heart muscle, slows the heart rate and helps eliminate fluid from body tissues. It’s often used to treat congestive heart failure and is also used to treat certain arrhythmias.
      And
      From Another Site: It is the seeds and leaves of the Common FOXGLOVE PLANT that are used to make digitalis.
      And
      From Me 🙂 – there is only a slight difference between proper dose and too much (lethal) so definitely need to gain precise knowledge of herbals before having to use!

      • Anonymous

        digitalis is mentioned in the story clan of the cave bear. you’d be surprised at the earth’s children forum site section on medicinal herbs.

  • Ipreach4god

    1. myslef, my wife, and daughter have nothing…but my son…he has CF and diabetes…so no new meds is going to be horrible…if you believe the experts…and i think i do, he will be one of the first to pass…between the lung and digestive disorder…the no insulin will be just as bad…

    2.storage…well, i have started stock piling meds…we refill prescriptions 6-8 days early(every time), we get at least 1 antibiotic a month( even if we do not need it…then use the oldest ones first), and we have started ordering vet meds online to give a shelf stable antibiotic(they are still good back up)…we have a separate refrigerator for meds…
    yes i know this will only be until something happens, but helps maintain shelf life…

    the next step was to get a lot of herbal medicine books and learn what does what and what can be replaced naturally…then we started stocking up on these…things like ginger for the blood sugar…

    next was to stock up on vitamins…this is not perfect, but will help overall…

    next was on things like diabetic needles, a non-digital blood tester and strips, inhalers for albuterol and other inhaled medicine…

    we also have been studying acupressure and acupuncture…a little bit of a stretch, but every little bit will help..

    3.we have learned that things like cinnamon, ginger, and bittermelon will all help…along with exercise.. we have started investing in seeds for herbs…and doing as much research as possible for all natural cures..

    4.healthier today…we exercise regularly, eat healthy, and keep as generally fit as possible…the other thing is knowledge…i am red cross first aid certified, along with all of my family members…LEARN!!!

    5.non-food…well, we have stocked up on about 400 rolls of toilet paper, 200 rolls of paper towels, and feminine hygiene products…things like 5 cases of toothpaste, cases of deodorant, laundry soap, dish liquid, antibacterial wipes, antibacterial gel, sitz baths, shampoo, and etc….

    we also have gotten 3 generators…2 small and 1 very large…we store 220 gal. of gas at all times, parts for my jeep, the motorcycles, the bicycles, and things…

    chainsaws, axes, hatchets, sleeping bags, tents, and etc….you get the picture…

    pool shock…seems weird, but it will stabilize water for storage…

    tools, batteries(may or may not help…depends on the situation), books…LEARN now!!!

    6. staying clean…yes…between baby wipes, antibacterial wipes, a hand laundry machine, house hold cleaners, and cases of toothpaste, and things…we will stay clean for a while…

    7. we have plenty of fresh water for months, and we also collect rain water in barrels…8 to be exact…so we have gray water for sometime…we also have a portable toilet..with bags( a lot of bags), and between the tp we have and baby wipes…we should be good for at least 9 months…i am also working on a way to drain the toilets out of the house with the gray water system…

    8.tools…no question…i can build most anything…it was a gift the God gave me…and then blessed me as a carpenter for 11 years…

  • Anonymous

    one method in storing prescribed medicine is asking for double dosage so you can cut the pill in half. hte medicine i take now i have to cut in half because my insurance does not pay for that small a dosage! that means i can potentially have a 6 months supply of the specified medicine. herbal remedies old wive’s tales, are another route to go. long before we have anti-bioiotics we had other remedies. the easiest thing for me to store that i could use later for bartering would be anything hygienic. travel size dental kits are easily explained as being availabe for when family and friends come to visit and they forgot theirs. my sister does this now! 20 combs in a packet for $1.00 is very cheap by today’s standards. what about later? huh? one expensive hair combing. don’t forget the hydrogen peroxide! the hand washing detergent (cuz that washer won’t be working and you don’t want tide on your hands!), dishwashing detergent, body bath for infants!, soaps, moisturizers, etc… these are luxuries people will eventually want later. if i can’t trade with them i’ll use them myself!

  • Julie K.

    I have high blood pressure and high cholesterol which would probably be eliminated if I ate solely from my food storage. My daughter has a life-threatening food allergy and we are very careful to avoid her coming across this food, but a very real and frightening scenario is that the Epi-pens needed to save her life only have a one year shelf life. There is no getting around that.
    We store extra medicine because with having 4 kids, someone is always fighting a cold or a fever. We go through our meds at the beginning of each year and toss the expired ones and make a list of needed ones and stock up and then submit the expenses to our Health Savings account. I think OTC meds will be eliminated from that program at the end of the year, so we might stock up before the year runs out.
    I don’t know about natural health remedies, so I will rely on the expertise of others.
    As far as getting healthier, I could eat out less and exercise more. I have a surgery schedule in a few weeks to eliminate a chronic condition and that is reassuring.
    We have stocked up on things like paper towels, toilet paper, shampoo, bars of soap, hand sanitizer, bleach, razors, toothbrushes and toothpaste, Kleenex, laundry detergent, liquid hand soap, rope and clothespins, shaving gel, as well as extra pairs of underwear and socks for each person in our family. I am hoping that some of these items will help us deal with illness as well as sanitation. We do have basic tools, but lumber is not something we have much of and I think it would be a necessity with constructing things.

    • J – newbie

      Julie, you may not revisit the comments for each topic, but thought I’d post this anyway “just in case” :-). Your mention of how critical Epi-pen is to your daughter really stayed in my mind, so I did a bit of a ‘Net search, and came up with the following. (Like everything on the ‘Net, you’ll want to do your own ‘check source’ so I’ve included the web sites from which I excerpted the info.)
      Hope it helps a bit.

      http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1523261/when_to_replace_an_epipen_epinephrine.html
      Excerpt about shelf life being 20 months, not 1 year as most people think:
      “The box for the EpiPen comes in has a dark brown or black rectangle on one side flap. It will show the expiry date with month and year. The EpiPen injector itself also has a small black box near it’s tip with the same information.
      Most EpiPens have a shelf life of approximately twenty months, however, pharmacies may issue them after they have been on the shelves for extended periods. Never assume that because your EpiPen was dispensed to you recently that it will not expire in a relatively short period of time.”

      http://www.wemsi.org/epinephrine.html — following Excerpt was near the bottom of article BUT read paragraphs before because using inhaler is different from pen!!
      “Patients who know that they are severely allergic to stings, various foods, and/or medications should consult their physician regarding the advisability of carrying an epinephrine self-injector, and should also ask about being referred to an allergist for desensitization therapy. An epinephrine inhaler might make a good addition to, but not a replacement for, the self-injector in such high-risk patients.
      Still, given its low cost, long shelf life, readily availability, high rate of patient compliance, and proven effectiveness, the epinephrine inhaler should receive greater usage than it currently does. It would make an excellent addition to a first aid kit.”

      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081111142003AAteoGz
      “Studies show that it can be used. In fact, in Europe, epinephrine inhaler have a broader following compared to its injected counterpart. Epinephrine given by inhaler is said to have more immediate effect on the laryngeal edema and the respiratory distress associated with anaphylaxis than does epinephrine given by any form of injection, and that an inhaler can have up to three times the shelf life of a self-injector.”