Step 10: Non-Food Items

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Purchase non-food items such as toothpaste, deodorant, female products, diapers, Paper plates, plastic utensils, etc. are helpful to avoid wasting water washing dishes.

Key Points

  • Store a year’s supply of all household items that you normally buy at the grocery store
  • Build up your supply by buying these items in large quantities when they are on sale, then only replace your stores when they go on sale again
  • Make sure you store the things particular to your family’s needs, our list might not include everything that YOU normally use
  • Don’t be afraid to use creative storage ideas for these items. A huge supply of toilet paper could go in a garage, attic, etc.

Items to Consider Storing

Personal Hygiene

  • Toothpaste/Toothbrushes
  • Shampoo/Conditioner
  • Deodorant
  • Facewash/Bodywash/Soap
  • Shaving/Aftershave

Paper Products

  • Toilet Paper (see bottom of this section for a great tips from a reader on how much to store)
  • Paper Towels
  • Feminine Products
  • Diapers/Wet Wipes
  • Kleenex
  • Paper Plates/Plastic Utensils/Napkins (can save on water in an emergency)

Cleaning Products

First Aid Items

Pet Care Products

  • Dog/Cat Food
  • Extra Water for Pets
  • Kitty Litter

Miscellaneous Items

  • Light Bulbs
  • Board Games/Cards (something to do in case the power is out)
  • Candles/Kerosene Lamps
  • Needles/Thread (for basic mending)

*When storing toilet paper: The question of how much do you need is easily answered. When you go to the store to buy because you are out, buy 3 times what you would normally and store 2 of them. When you need it again, repeat. After 6 months you’ve stored a year’s supply (twice what you used in 6 months!) Works for anything. You can shorten or lengthen the time it takes as your budget dictates by changing the multiple you buy. Twice as much as usual will take a year, 4 times as much will take 4 months, etc.

More Information

 

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  • I try to be as cheap as possible so instead of buying different
    kinds of soaps and cleaners I stock up on anti-bacterial dish soap as I find it
    to be the cheapest and most versatile. It might not be ideal but it will clean
    anything from you, to your clothes, to your home.

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  • Cina31373

    A lot of people use Scentsy I have found a use for the left over wax! I got a few molds form a craft store and a bag of wicks I just poor the used wax in the molds when I change the wax when it is full I pop it in the freezer for a few and they pop right out I have emergincy candles that burn great! We also use dryer lint and the wax in old egg cartons to make fire starters we just cut them in pices and store in zip bags.

  • CouponCook

    I stock up on paper goods when they go on sale. In our everyday lives we do not use paper towels, paper plates, ect. I am currently storing them in the top of my sons closet. I’m having to get creative and think UP when storing.

  • “Paper plates, plastic utensils, etc. are helpful to avoid wasting water washing dishes.”

    Sorry to say, I don’t think that the water you save makes up for the environmental impact that using disposable dishes and utensils has on the planet. There are many more reasons not to use these products that reasons to use them, so I think it’s unfortunate that you’re promoting them here.

    • In a short-term powerless situation where you may have not been able to get enough water stored beyond drinking water, I’d rather drink water than use it to clean….Ideally you should plan around it, and do the best you can to avoid using paper products. This is a last case scenario type thing.

    • Sheliadianehughey

      If society degenerates to the point where all this is necessary, I think worring about our impact on the environment will be a moot point.

  • PaulaP

    Since you literally have 100 comments, it really does not make sense to scan all 100 comments to find the tips on how much toilet paper to buy. Could you either put the info in the main part or give us some idea which comment has the tips on toilet paper? Thanks!

    • This comment seemed helpful in figuring out toilet paper. I’ll put it in the main page too… The question of how much do you need is easily answered. Say for toilet paper. When you go to the store to buy because you are out, buy 3 times what you would normally and store 2 of them. When you need it again, repeat. After 6 months you’ve stored a year’s supply (twice what you used in 6 months!) Works for anything. You can shorten or lengthen the time it takes as your budget dictates by changing the multiple you buy. Twice as much as usual will take a year, 4 times as much will take 4 months, etc.

  • Lisa

    Oil lamps are great alternatives too–inexpensive, and great ambiance. Sometimes the kids would rather turn these on and “camp out” while playing a board game together even if the power isn’t out.  Oil comes in small or larger containers and is cost-effective too.  Just make sure to keep away from little ones (we keep ours up on the mantle when not in use)

  • Susanbett

    to make your own wet wipes for changing diapers or keeping anyone clean, you can take an empty wipes container (the cylindrical kind) and cut a roll of paper towels in half to fit into the container.  Then fill up with water and some kind of mild cleanser like castille soap or something.  Very economical too.

  • peachteach

    I saw an idea on Pinterest to bring in solar walkway lights and put them in jars at night when there is a power outage.  Put them outside each day to rehcarge!

    • Debrak39

      I tried that last year… the lights worked only about till the time we went to bed.  If you want them for night lights to see around the house at night, no such luck.  I had them in a big candelabra a south-west facing window.  It was pretty, but not real practical.  Maybe there are stronger solar batteries that would charge better and last longer.

      • Reltney_mcfee

        Typically these lamps come with the cheapest, low-bid, ni cd batteries available.  If you purchase quality (expensive, relatively) lithium ion or ni-m-h batteries, they last through more charge/discharge sycles, as well as hold more juice (run longer before the light dims out).

  • Dee

    Keep a few pairs of warm shoes on hand. IE: Hiking boots, Sturdy Tennis shoes, Rubber boots.

  • Jim

    It is impossible to have “too many” ways to start a fire.  Stock up with matches, lighters, and fire steels.  Learn to start a fire with steel wool and a nine volt battery.  You may need alternate methods to cook your food, be ready for it.

  • Jim

    It is impossible to have “too many” ways to start a fire.  Stock up with matches, lighters, and fire steels.  Learn to start a fire with steel wool and a nine volt battery.  You may need alternate methods to cook your food, be ready for it.

  • How do i download page  non food items, cleaning, ect.

  • How do i download sheet for non food items-claning products ect.

  • Frogs

    Duct tape should be in everyone’s kit. It has many uses and a little goes a long way. Foil is another item that is very useful especially if you are cooking primatively. I cook a roast wrapped in foil in my chiminea for fun occasionally and to keep my skills honed.

    • Brenda

      I’m planning on buying the heavy duty restaurant foil they sell at the big box stores like Costco Sam’s . It is much thicker , could be reusable and won’t tear up as easily.

    • Nanner

      Duct tape and rolls of clear heavy duty plastic to repair windows in an emergency until glass can be put in.

  • Frogs

    Stocking up on deoderant? Try Crystal body deoderant stick. One stick has lasted my husband a year and it really works. How it works: you wet the crystal and apply it to your underarm. It is a mineral salt and a thin sightless layer inhibbits the growth of oder-causing bacteria. It works great on feet also. You can purchase this item at Walgreens. One crystal will cost around $5. Cheap for a years supply of deoderant.

    • Susanbett

      I have been using crystal deodorant sticks for many years.  Mine can last up to 7 years, provided you don’t drop it and break it!  I started using them because I have multiple sclerosis and wanted to avoid the aluminum in most deodorants (aluminum makes them an anti-perspirant).  My son with autism uses the natural aluminum-free roll-on type deodorants/several brands. There are still some ingredients in them that I would prefer not be there, but they work well for him. I don’t give him the crystal yet as he would undoubtedly accidently break it. I also keep one of the roll-on types in my purse/car for emergencies. 

  • Khaledn

    I need foods in the category.  May you have it to send me at khaledn@live.com

  • PrepperGama

    Pick up telephone books and newspapers to use as toilet paper some day…

    • Jim

      Sorry! This is a very bad idea.  The printing inks are known to cause cancer and other medical problems.  Take it from someone who used catalog pages half a century ago.

      • emorra

        The printing inks used today are all soy-based and safe, no lead or toxic chemicals anymore because of the prevalence of recycling.  So no problems using phone books and newspapers, other than the “softness” factor.  Take it from someone who works at a newspaper 😉

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  • Judie

    Don’t forget extra wick for your kerosene lamps. We had a 24 hour wide spread power outage and the stores sold out of the wick for lanterns. I went to every store imaginable and some said they didn;t even know where I could buy the wicks at. I got online and found a source so now I have wick in case there is a long power outage in the future.

    • Meyerc1604

      Hey on pinterest I found a way to make my own wicks !

    • Nanner

      I store lamp oil for kerosene lamps because kerosene stinks when the lamps are lit, but lamp oil does not.

  • Dustymom

    Shampoo: While I make liquid shampoo and bar shampoo now, I know that I will be trying this recipe: 2 Tablespoons of baking soda to a16 ounce bottle of water – mix and make sure that you let it come to room temp – can be cold. You only really wash your head, not the long part of your hair. Rinsing with vinegar water is awesome and no, not stinky.

    • Retired Teacher

      If you use the Baking Soda for your head – what about the rest of your hair?  I use hairspray and all of it needs shampooing.
      ZTKI’s g’mother.

  • Nomadjanet

    A good non food item is a solar battery charger for your battery stash. And if you are keeping oil lanterns don’t forget to keep oil.

  • Cdarts2

    Hi again, forgot to mention that I have two indoor cats and I would add leashes and collars for situations in emergency ie 72 hr kits. I thought of packing the 72 hr kit in a backpack so my hands are free to grab the cats in their carriers as I dash out the door. Plan to keep the bag loaded and near the door at all times along with the carriers with the leashes and collars inside.

  • Cdarts2

    Hi, I am a new enlistee on this site and I want to say that this is an answer to my prayers. For the first time in 30 yrs. I am able to begin food storage. A few days ago I got a deep gut feeling with a red alert going off so LOUD to start NOW! So with urgency I began browsing and asking questions about how to get started when I found this site and lo and behold! got all the answers I needed. I feel so relieved and I noticed in this step 10, no one mentioned storing batteries of all sizes, especially for deaf people like me who wear hearing aids. I buy my pack that lasts 3 to 4 months at Radio Shack when they are on sale. These are small sized and fit not only my hearing aids, but also in watches. For children some of their toys require batteries, too.
    I watched how I used toilet paper, and I learned to spare from wasting alot to only 4 pieces at one time.

  • ACK

    What about extra combs/brushes and hair clips…especially if you have little girls. Also we are trying to save up on extra clothing for our daughter (we wear dresses only) for when she’s older which might be hard to find or make and are currently buying homeschooling supplies for future use. Love the website…very encouraging.

  • Daisygrrrl

    As far as feminine products, if you are open to using it, a Diva Cup is awesome. It eliminates the need for tampons and you can reuse it for years. I love mine.

    • Blue_eyes

      hate to sound stupid… what is a “diva cup”?

      • MK

        It is a silicone cup that you insert in a similar way to a tampon. Instead of absorbing menstrual fluid, it contains it for emptying later. They’re actually really wonderful, although I prefer a brand called The Keeper

    • Susanbett

      the native american Indians would use the “fluff” from cattails for menstruation purposes and for baby diapers.  They are very absorbent. 

  • Gswitteman

    Consider buying the large size of hand sanitizer with the manual pump. If there is a pandemic or other sickness, put one inside each entrance of your home. If used everytime, it could cut down on the bad stuff getting inside.

    • emorra

       Remember that not all germs are killed by hand sanitizer–proper hand washing is the best way to keep germs from spreading.  And in fact, overuse of hand sanitizer and other germ-killing products like anti-bacterial hand soap and dish soap are completely messing up the eco system and creating/spreading super bugs.

      Keep Triclosan (which is in most hand sanitizers as well as things like toothpaste) out of your home and life and buy natural products:

      http://www.rodale.com/antibacterial-hand-soap

      http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-01-common-antimicrobial-inhibits-immune-cell.html

      http://www.usermeds.com/medications/triclosan

      http://fb.foodandwaterwatch.org/factsheet/triclosan-what-the-research-shows-2008-2010/

    • emorra

       I tried replying yesterday, but I guess my links weren’t appreciated.  In any case, hand sanitizer is NOT a replacement for proper hand washing.  Not to mention the serious health and environmental concerns relating to the anti-bacterial chemical TRICLOSAN when it comes to creating antibiotic resistant bugs and the negative effects of this chemical on human health–just google it since I can’t post links here.

      • Links are automatically disabled… sorry. If you send it through and it’s relevant we usually always approve them. We just approve them about once a week or so. If we don’t have this setting, we get spammed like you wouldn’t believe 🙂

        • emorra

           Thanks for the explanation, and also for posting my links (now showing just below this post)  🙂

          It’s very important to be as educated as possible about any products you plan to store 🙂

  • Matches

  • Debijeffery1

    I think some of the most important items could be a supply of herbs such as can be bought @ the honey-man, for an emergency kit perhaps even stored in a #10 can and sealed w/ oxygen absorber.Many herbs have medicinal properties such as anti-viral, anti-infection, lower blood pressure, anti- diarrhea, stress reducing,pain relief. Do your research you may be amazed! Best part you can grow alot of these plants as well as no prescription required. Perhaps a good herbal remedy book added to the emergency library…

  • Debijeffery1

    I think some of the most important items could be a supply of herbs such as can be bought @ the honey-man, for an emergency kit perhaps even stored in a #10 can and sealed w/ oxygen absorber.Many herbs have medicinal properties such as anti-viral, anti-infection, lower blood pressure, anti- diarrhea, stress reducing,pain relief. Do your research you may be amazed! Best part you can grow alot of these plants as well as no prescription required. Perhaps a good herbal remedy book added to the emergency library…

  • Hamrsark

    Some things we thought ought to be added to your lists were…Rubbing alcohol, Hydrogen Peroxide, Gauze (or brand new flat-fold diapers) – for use as bandages or slings, Vinegar (for cleaning fresh vegetables and fruit), and we are getting a water purifier instead of trying to store ALL our water…and, of course, a generator and gas…because there are some things you NEED electric for for a short time at a time. Also, Blackberry Brandy stops diarreha and Ginger Brandy will helps hault a cold at the first tickle (both only need 3-4 doses of a Tablespoon or so a dose).

  • sue

    Don’t forget a hunting rifle and ammo. I live in a rural area. I have stored salt to attract deer or elk. You might need it for personal protection as well.

  • J Carlton

    In the event that it becomes necessary to tap into my food storage I anticipate I MIGHT want a drink. Thus, Trader Joes, 2 Buck Chuck (i.e. Charles Shaw wine sold currently for $2.49, at least in my area). Yes, this will dehydrate you and dull your senses, but don’t tell me you’re not gonna want a drink from time to time once it all hits the fan. Just a thought.

    • Lol, I definitely include keeping some Diet Coke in my storage. I have to watch expiration dates though. Blech.

      • Carladet

        If you like soda, maybe you should buy a Soda Stream! They are great, from what I’ve heard. Not sure about shelf life though. Bed bath an Beyond for about $100 without coupon.

        • Mistyfan

          My sister in law has of those soda streams. Once in the bottle the fizz lasts a day or two. I seem to remember making orenge soda out of orenge juice and baking soda. I am sure if you are intrested you can find something on that.

  • I would add a supply of large safety/diaper pins, cheap bandanas and disposable gloves. The pins can be used for quick clothing repairs, emergency fish hooks, zipper pulls, backpack strap repairs etc. Bandanas can be used as head coverings, face masks, dish cloths, clothing patches, even a sling, when pinned to a shirt. Gloves are great for dealing with messes (cleaning your port-a potty), blood, etc., anything that might spread germs when washing water is scarce.

  • I would add a supply of large safety/diaper pins, cheap bandanas and disposable gloves. The pins can be used for quick clothing repairs, emergency fish hooks, zipper pulls, backpack strap repairs etc. Bandanas can be used as head coverings, face masks, dish cloths, clothing patches, even a sling, when pinned to a shirt. Gloves are great for dealing with messes (cleaning your port-a potty), blood, etc., anything that might spread germs when washing water is scarce.

  • gris

    I think sometimes we assume we would need a year supply because there is a huge disaster, either natural or man-made. But there are many reasons for needing a years supply-including the loss of a job, a trucking stike, etc…. Light-bulbs might just be a good thing to have on hand 🙂

  • Laura (Maine)

    I wear contacts, too. I keep an emergency pair of glasses in the car. (I’m the only one who drives it so they are always with me.) You can get some really cheap on line and you won’t run out of them no matter how long you have to go without.

  • Jo

    I have two in my family that wear contacts and I always have order the 6 month supply before when they have used 3 to 4 months up and I always stock up on the solution. I check the dates and rotate them. I wanted them to be able to see and to be prepared for a few weeks at least in case emergency.

  • Jo

    I have two in my family that wear contacts and I always have order the 6 month supply before when they have used 3 to 4 months up and I always stock up on the solution. I check the dates and rotate them. I wanted them to be able to see and to be prepared for a few weeks at least in case emergency.

  • Ed

    As for personal supplies, a good stock of condoms is never a bad idea! No intention to be rude in anyway, but in any kinda of long-term emergency I'd suspect my wife wouldnt be running to the store for her BC-pills! Love the site, thanks for all the tips.

  • Ed

    As for personal supplies, a good stock of condoms is never a bad idea! No intention to be rude in anyway, but in any kinda of long-term emergency I’d suspect my wife wouldnt be running to the store for her BC-pills! Love the site, thanks for all the tips.

    • Lisa

      Make sure you store them in a cool place. Heat degrades the latex/rubber in condoms.

    • MK

      Great idea. She may want to consider a copper IUD. It lasts 10 years. I’m a fan of mine

  • tutus

    A lot of times around this time of year coupons come out in the paper for sun screen. Sometimes it is good on any size. Be on the lookout for $1/1 on any size XX(brand) sunscreen. A lot of times you can find them in the travel section at Walmart or Target and get them for free or pennies with coupons! 🙂

  • tutus

    A lot of times around this time of year coupons come out in the paper for sun screen. Sometimes it is good on any size. Be on the lookout for $1/1 on any size XX(brand) sunscreen. A lot of times you can find them in the travel section at Walmart or Target and get them for free or pennies with coupons! 🙂

  • Toilet Paper Saver

    It's really not sanitary to have homemade toilet paper. It doesn't matter how little your carbon footprint is if you get dysentery because you ran out of cloths/stuff to clean the cloths with.

  • Awesome tip. I love your blog, lovely design and good content.

  • Wow, great tip. Thanks!

  • Carole Gentry

    This comes from personal experience last month. If storing STERNO; check it periodically. Just give it a little shake. We lost power and thought I would just heat a little water for tea. The sterno had completely evaporated. Little did I know. That was a first for me. It was probably pretty old, but just in case.

    Thanks for all the help Carole in Sacramento CA

  • Carole Gentry

    This comes from personal experience last month. If storing STERNO; check it periodically. Just give it a little shake. We lost power and thought I would just heat a little water for tea. The sterno had completely evaporated. Little did I know. That was a first for me. It was probably pretty old, but just in case.

    Thanks for all the help Carole in Sacramento CA

  • Many new parents find that the price of diapers is a big expense and makes keeping a budget even harder than they might have expected. Did you know that you can find free diapers coupons in a variety of different places? You can find them online and through the coupon fliers that come in your newspapers.

  • Many new parents find that the price of diapers is a big expense and makes keeping a budget even harder than they might have expected. Did you know that you can find free diapers coupons in a variety of different places? You can find them online and through the coupon fliers that come in your newspapers.

  • I found after Hurricanes Rita, and Ike having glow sticks hanging from the ceiling fans and light fixtures gave enough light throughout the night to see and manuever after dark. It also created a sense of security to my children having “the lights on” as they would go to the bathroom or kitchen after bedtime. I was secure know there were no open flames burning.

    We also played horseshoes, badmittion and volleyball during the day, all the games we would play when we go camping. My two sons, would go through the neighborhood helping neighbors clean their yards and they would sleep very good each night tired from all the work. At night would listen to our emergency radio that broadcast local television stations. I listened for 6 days, straight and never needed to change batteries.

    • Charlesw

      Rita and Ike were helpful to us in that they exposed the holes in our emergency preparedness. It was horrible, though, for so MANY people! After Rita we bought a generator. It was invaluable when we lost power during Ike. Ike showed us that we needed heavy duty long extension cords and a safe way to store gasoline. Thankfully, my suburban has a 42 gallon tank which I keep full at all times now!

      • Linda_peterson42

        when buying a generator keep in mind that gasoline will eventually “spoil” Deisel will not.

        • Holly

          We rotate gas from fall into winter. We pour last years purchase into the car. Take containers to station, add stabil for 2 years, then pump gas gas so it mixes. We bought a cheap metal shelf to store cans in a shed.
          Ive a homemade video on cell phones to remind us how to use the generator.
          Id also recommend supplies so that if you run a cord through windows or sliding doors to stop draft especially in winter. Like the plywood people use around window ac units and foam insulation strips.

  • I found after Hurricanes Rita, and Ike having glow sticks hanging from the ceiling fans and light fixtures gave enough light throughout the night to see and manuever after dark. It also created a sense of security to my children having “the lights on” as they would go to the bathroom or kitchen after bedtime. I was secure know there were no open flames burning.

    We also played horseshoes, badmittion and volleyball during the day, all the games we would play when we go camping. My two sons, would go through the neighborhood helping neighbors clean their yards and they would sleep very good each night tired from all the work. At night would listen to our emergency radio that broadcast local television stations. I listened for 6 days, straight and never needed to change batteries.

  • Anonymous

    Now, I need help finding suscreen to put in storage?

    • Anonymous

      A lot of times around this time of year coupons come out in the paper for sun screen. Sometimes it is good on any size. Be on the lookout for $1/1 on any size XX(brand) sunscreen. A lot of times you can find them in the travel section at Walmart or Target and get them for free or pennies with coupons! 🙂

  • Anonymous

    Found this on Handmaiden’s Kitchen
    It’s quick and easy to make your own natural, waterless hand sanitizer.

    Gather Your Ingredients

    1 cup aloe vera gel
    1 tsp rubbing alcohol
    2 tsp vegetable glycerin
    8-10 drops tea tree essential oil or lavender essential oil

    Simply blend all of the ingredients together and store.

    Decide Where You are Going to Store Your Sanitizer

    Be creative! You can recycle old liquid soap or hand sanitizer dispensers. You can also purchase a beautiful glass jar with a pump top to store and display your sanitizer. Think out of the box. If you find some nice glass jars and then add your own label, you can give home made sanitizers as gifts to family and friends!

    Choose Essential Oils Carefully

    The original recipe calls for tea tree or lavender oil, but you can be creative and use other types of essential oils as well. I like to pull out a list of oils that have antibacterial AND antiviral properties and make a blend that suits the season. Look at the properties of citrus oils, especially. Use oils that suit your likes as far as scents are concerned but will still add the cleansing properties appropriate for a hand sanitizer.

    Use Sparingly

    Your home made hand sanitizer will not dissolve into your hands as quickly or effectively as the commercial hand sanitizers you buy in the store. It is better to err on the side of too little than to end up wiping excess sanitizer off of your hands later. Waste not – want not!

    • Sarah

      This is not a recipe I would use. If you use an alcohol based sanitizer then you need to have it at least 62% alcohol. This recipe does not have even close to that. It also does not have nearly enough tea tree oil to kill anything either. If using regular 70% rubbing alcohol you could add 1 teaspoon tea tree oil to 1/2 cup alcohol and have better smelling alcohol but if you add any more you ruin it’s germ killing effectiveness. Just find good deals and use coupons to buy the real stuff, it smells better and actually works (and you can probably get it cheaper anyway). http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2594585/diy_hand_sanitizers_ineffective_uneconomical.html?cat=25

  • liz76522

    Now, I need help finding suscreen to put in storage?

  • liz76522

    It's quick and easy to make your own natural, waterless hand sanitizer.

    Gather Your Ingredients

    1 cup aloe vera gel
    1 tsp rubbing alcohol
    2 tsp vegetable glycerin
    8-10 drops tea tree essential oil or lavender essential oil

    Simply blend all of the ingredients together and store.

    Decide Where You are Going to Store Your Sanitizer

    Be creative! You can recycle old liquid soap or hand sanitizer dispensers. You can also purchase a beautiful glass jar with a pump top to store and display your sanitizer. Think out of the box. If you find some nice glass jars and then add your own label, you can give home made sanitizers as gifts to family and friends!

    Choose Essential Oils Carefully

    The original recipe calls for tea tree or lavender oil, but you can be creative and use other types of essential oils as well. I like to pull out a list of oils that have antibacterial AND antiviral properties and make a blend that suits the season. Look at the properties of citrus oils, especially. Use oils that suit your likes as far as scents are concerned but will still add the cleansing properties appropriate for a hand sanitizer.

    Use Sparingly

    Your home made hand sanitizer will not dissolve into your hands as quickly or effectively as the commercial hand sanitizers you buy in the store. It is better to err on the side of too little than to end up wiping excess sanitizer off of your hands later. Waste not – want not!

  • liz76522

    “Gladrags”, and for the younger female members of our household, I ordered the teen kit for each of them! I'm excited, I wish I had these options when I was growing up! My oldest darling daughter has committed to using “it” “the cup” for 2-3 months, then I think I'll store new ones in the shelter for TEOTWAWKI, LOL!

  • Karen Cook

    Dry dog and cat food don’t store as well as their raw ingredients – the fats and oils in the food get rancid after several months. All meat dog food [canned] plus rice and vegetables [e.g., carrots] would store better [obviously the carrots would have to be freshly grown or freeze-dried/dehydrated.

    Light bulbs are an odd thing to save for emergencies – if there is no power, wouldn’t light bulbs be kind of moot?

    • gris

      I think sometimes we assume we would need a year supply because there is a huge disaster, either natural or man-made. But there are many reasons for needing a years supply-including the loss of a job, a trucking stike, etc…. Light-bulbs might just be a good thing to have on hand 🙂

    • labbie1

      If you decide to use the canned dog food plus rice and vegetables, make SURE to COOK THE RICE before feeding to the dog or it will expand in their stomach and either make them very ill or even explode their stomach!

    • LovesJesus

      A light bulb can be lit with a wire and a battery.

  • Karen Cook

    Dry dog and cat food don't store as well as their raw ingredients – the fats and oils in the food get rancid after several months. All meat dog food [canned] plus rice and vegetables [e.g., carrots] would store better [obviously the carrots would have to be freshly grown or freeze-dried/dehydrated.

    Light bulbs are an odd thing to save for emergencies – if there is no power, wouldn't light bulbs be kind of moot?

  • I don’t know if anyone else thought about those but you can books, coloring boys, crayons, coloring pencils, mad libs, puzzles to the misc list for things to do if you are without power. Legos, dolls and cars can keep small (and not so small) children entertained for hours without using electrical power. Have some of your habby items around to help you keep calm. If you stay calm, chances are your children will be able to stay calm too

    • Red_rooster1998

      Yes, We like family reading when the power goes out. We have lots of good books- I think storing books is a GREAT idea!
      Be Blessed!

      • Anonymous

        Kindles are great.  They store so many books, games, copies of important papers and maps etc., and can check email etc..

  • I don't know if anyone else thought about those but you can books, coloring boys, crayons, coloring pencils, mad libs, puzzles to the misc list for things to do if you are without power. Legos, dolls and cars can keep small (and not so small) children entertained for hours without using electrical power. Have some of your habby items around to help you keep calm. If you stay calm, chances are your children will be able to stay calm too

  • Great tips!

  • Anonymous

    Don’t forget to store some needles and thread. Clothes could get pretty ratty if we can’t mend or sew on a button. And those babies don’t stop growing just because there is an emergency of some kind so some extra fabric would be a good idea too.

  • dorothysandaker

    Don't forget to store some needles and thread. Clothes could get pretty ratty if we can't mend or sew on a button. And those babies don't stop growing just because there is an emergency of some kind so some extra fabric would be a good idea too.

  • Great additions. This is definitely something we need to learn more about!

  • Anonymous

    Miscellaneous items to store: storable fuel for cooking :
    charcoal for the grill, canned fuel (chafing dish fuel), homemade buddy burners, alcohol burners (use 91% alcohol for clean burn), make and learn how to use a solar oven (start with a mylar covered windshield reflector), Coleman fuel for a camp stove, other compressed fuel (used with inexpensive small camp stove)

  • kdonat

    Miscellaneous items to store: storable fuel for cooking :
    charcoal for the grill, canned fuel (chafing dish fuel), homemade buddy burners, alcohol burners (use 91% alcohol for clean burn), make and learn how to use a solar oven (start with a mylar covered windshield reflector), Coleman fuel for a camp stove, other compressed fuel (used with inexpensive small camp stove)

  • Anonymous

    Under your topic:
    * Pet Care Products:
    •Dog/Cat Food
    •Extra Water for Pets
    •Kitty Litter

    Add:

    Pet Care Items:
    *Pet Health records, (including vaccination info)
    *Pets favorite toy(s)
    *Pet carrier near main exit door

    HTH,

  • rorifirebaugn

    Under your topic:
    * Pet Care Products:
    •Dog/Cat Food
    •Extra Water for Pets
    •Kitty Litter

    Add:

    Pet Care Items:
    *Pet Health records, (including vaccination info)
    *Pets favorite toy(s)
    *Pet carrier near main exit door

    HTH,

  • Anonymous

    Kerosene Lamps can release Carbon Monoxide as far as I know. On a related note, the new Butane stoves out of Korea, can be used to cook inside without causing Carbon Monoxide poisoning, though care should be taken with open flame around anything flamable.

    • Frogs

      Anything burning gives off Carbon Monoxide (CO), even a candle. The cleaner the burn the less CO. Ventilation is always needed when burning indoors.

  • rlpmjp

    Kerosene Lamps can release Carbon Monoxide as far as I know. On a related note, the new Butane stoves out of Korea, can be used to cook inside without causing Carbon Monoxide poisoning, though care should be taken with open flame around anything flamable.

  • Cheri

    I have Gladrags stored. They are washable maxi pads. Also it’s hard to store a year’s worth of toilet paper so I’ve stored spay bottles for each family member. You fill it with a couple drops of liquid soap and water and just squirt yourself off.
    Don’t forget about laundry care! I have a washboard and metal tub stored. And lots of Fels-Naptha solid laundry soap (I got it at Ace Hardware). Also I have a retractable laundry line and clothspins.
    It’s also easier (and cheaper) to store cloth hankies than tons and tons of Kleenex.

    • emorra

       Very important to USE these things, rather than just STORING them.  This is not aimed at the OP but rather at the readers: 

      If you don’t know how to do laundry by hand (wringing out is very difficult and hard on the hands) you need to PRACTICE in advance of emergencies. 

      Laundry is easy to wash if you walk on it and swirl it around in soapy water with your feet in either a laundry tub or bathtub.  But wringing out is difficult, and rinsing takes a LOT of water.  Think about how to minimize your laundry needs by wearing clothes longer, till they are ACTUALLY dirty rather than just having been worn once or twice.

      Cloth items like feminine supplies and handkerchiefs are a great way to save the environment on a more everyday basis since they take up very little extra space/water in a normal laundry wash, however in a water-less emergency you will run out of these items quickly, so be prepared for this type of disaster as well.

  • Cheri

    I have Gladrags stored. They are washable maxi pads. Also it's hard to store a year's worth of toilet paper so I've stored spay bottles for each family member. You fill it with a couple drops of liquid soap and water and just squirt yourself off.
    Don't forget about laundry care! I have a washboard and metal tub stored. And lots of Fels-Naptha solid laundry soap (I got it at Ace Hardware). Also I have a retractable laundry line and clothspins.
    It's also easier (and cheaper) to store cloth hankies than tons and tons of Kleenex.

  • Jessica

    The more “green” you are- the easier it is to have a year supply of toiletries. For example, you can cut up old t-shirts/towels and have “homemade toilet paper”, as well as using cloth diapers and the diva cup (reuseable feminine article). I bought a diva for $15 and am now done with storage for feminine hygiene. We just have one extra load a week for laundry and wash on sanitize mode. No storage space or extra money necessary.

    • Toilet Paper Saver

      It’s really not sanitary to have homemade toilet paper. It doesn’t matter how little your carbon footprint is if you get dysentery because you ran out of cloths/stuff to clean the cloths with.

      • Coolhomeschool

        maybe she was saying use the t-shirt rags once & toss….they are old anyway
        ?

      • granny mae

        I disagree.  As an olderster I have used cloth diapers and washed them over and over just as you could with rags for toilet paper and my grandmother told me they used rags for their periods when she was younger and they just washed them.  What you do is keep a pail with a lid on it half full of water, to soak the rags in.  When ready to wash you dump the water in a place away from the house and rinse the rags with water then wash.   It takes a little more time especially if you have to wash by hand but be sure to use bleach and rinse well. 

        • granny mae

          Another thing, if you are leary of using your hands be sure to store some rubber gloves.  By the way grandmother did her was in a tub with a scrub board so it isn’t so bad if you have to go back a few years.  It won’t last forever.

          • Anonymous

            One of those plunger type things sold in hardware stores for washing clothes is the solution.  It is a plunger with holes and you just plunge the clothes in a bucket of water and with your homemade soap.  They work pretty good.  Another thing to have on hand would be a ringer on a mop bucket to ring the clothes.  Unless you’re lucky enough to find an old ringer off a ringer wash machine.

  • Jessica

    The more “green” you are- the easier it is to have a year supply of toiletries. For example, you can cut up old t-shirts/towels and have “homemade toilet paper”, as well as using cloth diapers and the diva cup (reuseable feminine article). I bought a diva for $15 and am now done with storage for feminine hygiene. We just have one extra load a week for laundry and wash on sanitize mode. No storage space or extra money necessary.

  • Nice list..It will help a lot especially to kids.. They will know how to prioritize cleaning especially in toilet and kitchen..

    • lgd113

      Sunshine sanitizes anything used instead of tp. I use washcloths instead of tp. I feel they are clean once they are washed, but drying them in the sun assures they are sanitized. Any old cloth cut can be used for tp. Like someone said–cut up old tshirts. this could be the tp storage project for now. Maybe someone would want to store cloth for pee and tp for poo. Pee is sterile. It’s is the poo that will be the carrier of eColi.

  • Nice list..It will help a lot especially to kids.. They will know how to prioritize cleaning especially in toilet and kitchen..

  • Love the site – thanks for creating it! I’m working on expanding past a 2-week pantry now.

    Don’t forget to have something to do, and something for the kids to do. A couple decks of cards, bean bags – non-electric games for entertainment. A few years ago we had one deck of cards; now we have several board games and a few more decks of cards. When the power goes out, we turn on the scanner and light candles, and hang out. I live in a hurricane area, so I tend to think emergencies involve the electric being off, too.

  • Love the site – thanks for creating it! I’m working on expanding past a 2-week pantry now.

    Don’t forget to have something to do, and something for the kids to do. A couple decks of cards, bean bags – non-electric games for entertainment. A few years ago we had one deck of cards; now we have several board games and a few more decks of cards. When the power goes out, we turn on the scanner and light candles, and hang out. I live in a hurricane area, so I tend to think emergencies involve the electric being off, too.

  • cecilia

    There is one thing that you should always have in storage. TP is important but pads and tampons are, too. I would hate to be in a disaster moment and my period starts. That would just make it worse. With 3 females in my house it is a MUST.

  • cecilia

    There is one thing that you should always have in storage. TP is important but pads and tampons are, too. I would hate to be in a disaster moment and my period starts. That would just make it worse. With 3 females in my house it is a MUST.

    • Anonymous

      “Gladrags”, and for the younger female members of our household, I ordered the teen kit for each of them! I’m excited, I wish I had these options when I was growing up! My oldest darling daughter has committed to using “it” “the cup” for 2-3 months, then I think I’ll store new ones in the shelter for TEOTWAWKI, LOL!

  • Lois

    I would also recomend stocking up on light bulbs, if you are just planning for provident living. If you ever hit a hard time, but power/electricity wasn’t an issue, you would run out of bulbs. If you are concerned with running into natural disasters, we might all consider karosine lamps, lanterns, flashlights, etc. Just a thought. And yes, a good way to stock up on perscription medicine that you may be worried about running out of, is just to leave 5-10 pills at the end of each refill. Before long, you could have a three month supply.

  • Lois

    I would also recomend stocking up on light bulbs, if you are just planning for provident living. If you ever hit a hard time, but power/electricity wasn’t an issue, you would run out of bulbs. If you are concerned with running into natural disasters, we might all consider karosine lamps, lanterns, flashlights, etc. Just a thought. And yes, a good way to stock up on perscription medicine that you may be worried about running out of, is just to leave 5-10 pills at the end of each refill. Before long, you could have a three month supply.

  • Theresa

    I completely agree about the toilet paper storage and have 3 months on hand right now (looking for places to put more). However, during a “crisis” I don’t really want to put up with a husband grumpy about his toilet paper as well, so I decided to buy our regular soft brand but focused on purchasing double rolls to save space. I also suggest stocking a 6 month’s supply of hand sanitizer and face masks as well because since this H1N1 flu scare started, all of the stores and pharmacies (I live 9 miles from the Texas/Mexico border) have been out of these products. If I needed these items for any reason I currently could not obtain them and our area relies heavily on trucking to bring in all of our supplies from the rest of the U.S.

  • Theresa

    I completely agree about the toilet paper storage and have 3 months on hand right now (looking for places to put more). However, during a “crisis” I don’t really want to put up with a husband grumpy about his toilet paper as well, so I decided to buy our regular soft brand but focused on purchasing double rolls to save space. I also suggest stocking a 6 month’s supply of hand sanitizer and face masks as well because since this H1N1 flu scare started, all of the stores and pharmacies (I live 9 miles from the Texas/Mexico border) have been out of these products. If I needed these items for any reason I currently could not obtain them and our area relies heavily on trucking to bring in all of our supplies from the rest of the U.S.

    • Katb64

      When planing ahead if certian items are hard to come by in your area how about the internet. There are a lot of things that might be hard to get in your area that sites like Amazon or Riteaid might could ship to you and if you buy $25-35 worth the shipping can be free.

  • John

    The question of how much do you need is easily answered. Say for toilet paper. When you go to the store to buy because you are out, buy 3 times what you would normally and store 2 of them. When you need it again, repeat. After 6 months you’ve stored a year’s supply (twice what you used in 6 months!) Works for anything. You can shorten or lengthen the time it takes as your budget dictates by changing the multiple you buy. Twice as much as usual will take a year, 4 times as much will take 4 months, etc.

  • John

    The question of how much do you need is easily answered. Say for toilet paper. When you go to the store to buy because you are out, buy 3 times what you would normally and store 2 of them. When you need it again, repeat. After 6 months you’ve stored a year’s supply (twice what you used in 6 months!) Works for anything. You can shorten or lengthen the time it takes as your budget dictates by changing the multiple you buy. Twice as much as usual will take a year, 4 times as much will take 4 months, etc.

  • Linda

    For TP – In the paper every month is a “.50 off 2 Cottenelle” coupon (you can also order these from a coupon clipper service). At Kroger they double to $1 – the 4 packs are $1 – so using the coupon you would get two 4 packs for $1!! Since they are the small rolls and there are 4 girls here, we figured 1 roll per day – 365 rolls – 92 four packs – $46 for a year supply of toilet paper! You can also go to Cottenelle.com and print off coupons to get free toilet paper (.50 off 1 package, which doubles to $1, thus making it free), each coupon can be printed twice per month per computer. Hope that can help someone!!

  • Linda

    For TP – In the paper every month is a “.50 off 2 Cottenelle” coupon (you can also order these from a coupon clipper service). At Kroger they double to $1 – the 4 packs are $1 – so using the coupon you would get two 4 packs for $1!! Since they are the small rolls and there are 4 girls here, we figured 1 roll per day – 365 rolls – 92 four packs – $46 for a year supply of toilet paper! You can also go to Cottenelle.com and print off coupons to get free toilet paper (.50 off 1 package, which doubles to $1, thus making it free), each coupon can be printed twice per month per computer. Hope that can help someone!!

    • Prepping in Hawaii

      Try installing Safari, Firefox, and Internet Explorer…..it’s not per computer, it’s per browser…..When I hit the limit on one browser, I switch to the next.

  • Melynda

    I was spoiled by http://www.PinchingYourPennies.com while living in UT – what an awesome site! When we moved to VA, I had to find different sources for couponing helps. http://www.afullcup.com is a great coupon website for those in the south. Their user generated shopping lists are great! http://www.hotcouponworld.com is another great website for folks as well.

    Between all of these sites, I haven’t actually paid for non-food items in about 3 years. I am also able to give away huge volumes of stuff to others at church and in the community. I rotate what we need into our own storage and then give away what we don’t use.

  • Melynda

    I was spoiled by http://www.PinchingYourPennies.com while living in UT – what an awesome site! When we moved to VA, I had to find different sources for couponing helps. http://www.afullcup.com is a great coupon website for those in the south. Their user generated shopping lists are great! http://www.hotcouponworld.com is another great website for folks as well.

    Between all of these sites, I haven’t actually paid for non-food items in about 3 years. I am also able to give away huge volumes of stuff to others at church and in the community. I rotate what we need into our own storage and then give away what we don’t use.

  • Jean

    There is a coupon matching site called couponmom.com that matches coupons for most states. I use it here in Florida. This one is free. There is another one called TheGroceryGame.com that has a small monthly fee. Hope it helps.
    oh, also refundcents.com is really good.

  • Jean

    There is a coupon matching site called couponmom.com that matches coupons for most states. I use it here in Florida. This one is free. There is another one called TheGroceryGame.com that has a small monthly fee. Hope it helps.
    oh, also refundcents.com is really good.

  • Andrea

    pinchingyourpennies.com has been a useful website for me in AZ. It matches coupons with sales for local grocery store chains and has links to national drug stores and larger stores(walmart, target) as well.

  • Andrea

    pinchingyourpennies.com has been a useful website for me in AZ. It matches coupons with sales for local grocery store chains and has links to national drug stores and larger stores(walmart, target) as well.

  • Crustyrusty

    Momma says that if she can see the floor in the linen closet then we don’t have enough TP 🙂

  • Crustyrusty

    Momma says that if she can see the floor in the linen closet then we don’t have enough TP 🙂

  • Dick

    Don’g forget pets are part of the family.

    When considering non food items, don’t forget about the family pets. I have found that most dry dog food in the 25# and 50# bags have a shelf life of about 1 year when kept sealed. (I don’t believe that the dry canning operation would appreciate canning of dried dog food.) The other option is to use 1/2 gallon canning jars along with a vaccum sealer and oxygen absorbers for longer storage.

    I do not have any pets, but my children do. My daughter has prepared for her cats, but my son has not prepared for his dog. I have measured and weighed the dog’s average daily consumption and have calculated her needs. I have added storage of dried dog food to my list.

  • Dick

    Don’g forget pets are part of the family.

    When considering non food items, don’t forget about the family pets. I have found that most dry dog food in the 25# and 50# bags have a shelf life of about 1 year when kept sealed. (I don’t believe that the dry canning operation would appreciate canning of dried dog food.) The other option is to use 1/2 gallon canning jars along with a vaccum sealer and oxygen absorbers for longer storage.

    I do not have any pets, but my children do. My daughter has prepared for her cats, but my son has not prepared for his dog. I have measured and weighed the dog’s average daily consumption and have calculated her needs. I have added storage of dried dog food to my list.

  • Regarding Toilet Paper – I did a test for my family of 5 (1 dad, 1 mom, 1 teen boy, 2 teen girls) and found that we used rougly 1 roll per day.

    THE TEST: I found this out by taking all of the TP out of each bathroom (even removed partial rolls and under sinks and in closet) and then put back only 4 rolls. I did this on a Saturday evening. Then, the next Saturday, I checked and did a tally and realized that we used roughly 1 roll per day.

    Note that this is different if you have more people at home during the day OR if you have more girls than boys OR if you have more sickness . . . There can be lots of variables but this gave us at least a ballpark figure. Storing 365 rolls of toilet paper is totally doable in my garage.

  • Regarding Toilet Paper – I did a test for my family of 5 (1 dad, 1 mom, 1 teen boy, 2 teen girls) and found that we used rougly 1 roll per day.

    THE TEST: I found this out by taking all of the TP out of each bathroom (even removed partial rolls and under sinks and in closet) and then put back only 4 rolls. I did this on a Saturday evening. Then, the next Saturday, I checked and did a tally and realized that we used roughly 1 roll per day.

    Note that this is different if you have more people at home during the day OR if you have more girls than boys OR if you have more sickness . . . There can be lots of variables but this gave us at least a ballpark figure. Storing 365 rolls of toilet paper is totally doable in my garage.

  • Marie

    My solution for the toilet paper formula is:

    Stock all the of the bathrooms with plenty of rolls. Record the date I placed the rolls and the amount per bathroom. End of the month I tabulate how many rolls are missing from the bathroom supplies when I go to restock. Subtract the number of rolls used from the number of rolls stocked and add it all up. Presto!

    If you want to get more precise, multiply the number of rolls used by the number of sheets per roll that way you can take advantage of double or mega roll discounts whenever possible.

    This is also handy to ferret out overuse. Also people should consider hand-held bidet as they are much more efficient. I agree with Amber on the Scotts 1000, we use the Marcal Fluffy Recycled 1000 One-Ply Tissue and it lasts much longer and is more economical than most other brands.

  • Marie

    My solution for the toilet paper formula is:

    Stock all the of the bathrooms with plenty of rolls. Record the date I placed the rolls and the amount per bathroom. End of the month I tabulate how many rolls are missing from the bathroom supplies when I go to restock. Subtract the number of rolls used from the number of rolls stocked and add it all up. Presto!

    If you want to get more precise, multiply the number of rolls used by the number of sheets per roll that way you can take advantage of double or mega roll discounts whenever possible.

    This is also handy to ferret out overuse. Also people should consider hand-held bidet as they are much more efficient. I agree with Amber on the Scotts 1000, we use the Marcal Fluffy Recycled 1000 One-Ply Tissue and it lasts much longer and is more economical than most other brands.

  • candace

    I agree with the Scott’s brand tip. That stuff lasts forever!

  • candace

    I agree with the Scott’s brand tip. That stuff lasts forever!

  • Angel

    Toilet paper is one of my top priorites! :o)

    I havent really figured out how much we use here but it is alot!
    Now imagine you have company or if there is an emergency elsewhere and you have another family living with you for a couple of weeks!

    I store packages of toilet paper UNDER the kids beds.
    It fits well and helps keep the kids from shoving all of their clothes, toys, etc under there.

    I think ti is very important to think about storing these things and everything really by thinking…..
    what will I need for the time my electricity is out, the trucks cant get to the store, my significant other wont be working.
    If I-5 is flooded and closed and there is no easy or open route to go around how are the trucks going ot get the things you need to the store????
    In Washington this happened and the people in Portland were effected because the trucks coming from Seattle couldnt get through.
    SO it isnt just local emergencies that can effect us.
    Some are long reaching.

    And we NEED toilet paper LOL

  • Angel

    Toilet paper is one of my top priorites! :o)

    I havent really figured out how much we use here but it is alot!
    Now imagine you have company or if there is an emergency elsewhere and you have another family living with you for a couple of weeks!

    I store packages of toilet paper UNDER the kids beds.
    It fits well and helps keep the kids from shoving all of their clothes, toys, etc under there.

    I think ti is very important to think about storing these things and everything really by thinking…..
    what will I need for the time my electricity is out, the trucks cant get to the store, my significant other wont be working.
    If I-5 is flooded and closed and there is no easy or open route to go around how are the trucks going ot get the things you need to the store????
    In Washington this happened and the people in Portland were effected because the trucks coming from Seattle couldnt get through.
    SO it isnt just local emergencies that can effect us.
    Some are long reaching.

    And we NEED toilet paper LOL

  • Amber

    In regards to dishwasher detergent, and dishwashing liquid, I have decided to concentrate more on storing dishwashing liquid. The reason I decided this was because if ever the need arose for me to REALLY rely on my food storage, there is most likely going to be a lack of money for bills as well. And I figure it’s probably cheaper to wash the dishes by hand than it is to run the dishwasher.

  • Amber

    In regards to dishwasher detergent, and dishwashing liquid, I have decided to concentrate more on storing dishwashing liquid. The reason I decided this was because if ever the need arose for me to REALLY rely on my food storage, there is most likely going to be a lack of money for bills as well. And I figure it’s probably cheaper to wash the dishes by hand than it is to run the dishwasher.

  • Amber

    It may seem unrealistic to some to store a year supply of toilet paper, but it really isn’t. I would suggest Scotts 1000 (the regular kind- not extra soft). Sure, it’s not the softest in the world, but it’s soft enough for me and it gets the job done and it is more absorbant than you may think. One roll lasts us about a week in our household of 7 believe it or not. So all I have to do is buy 4 or 5 12-roll packs and I’m set. And it doesn’t take up much space which is an issue for me so this is the perfect solution for my family.

  • Amber

    It may seem unrealistic to some to store a year supply of toilet paper, but it really isn’t. I would suggest Scotts 1000 (the regular kind- not extra soft). Sure, it’s not the softest in the world, but it’s soft enough for me and it gets the job done and it is more absorbant than you may think. One roll lasts us about a week in our household of 7 believe it or not. So all I have to do is buy 4 or 5 12-roll packs and I’m set. And it doesn’t take up much space which is an issue for me so this is the perfect solution for my family.

  • In reguards to toilet paper for one month after each roll was empty I then wrote the date on the roll and saved them for one month. Each bathroom was recorded. I found out what my family used this way. We used five rolls per month per bathroom. I write the date I used other Items and keep a running tally in a book. It has been really helpful.

  • Gayle Burbidge

    In reguards to toilet paper for one month after each roll was empty I then wrote the date on the roll and saved them for one month. Each bathroom was recorded. I found out what my family used this way. We used five rolls per month per bathroom. I write the date I used other Items and keep a running tally in a book. It has been really helpful.

  • Kylene

    I’ve read a lot about emergency preparedness, and your site has really been great and added a lot of info where some things were missing.

    In regards to toilet paper, I’ve read you need to store about 1 roll per person per week. I haven’t tried this yet, but it sounds about right for our needs.

  • Kylene

    I’ve read a lot about emergency preparedness, and your site has really been great and added a lot of info where some things were missing.

    In regards to toilet paper, I’ve read you need to store about 1 roll per person per week. I haven’t tried this yet, but it sounds about right for our needs.

  • Joyce

    I actually started with Non-Food Items a number of years ago. I didn’t know where to start with food, so I started with toiletries and other necessities. It seemed to give me confidence to move on to food items.:) I still have a lot more toilet paper than our family could use in many months. It keeps forever, so I continue to buy our favorite brand whenever it’s on sale.
    Thanks so much for your great site! I check on you gals daily.:)
    Joyce

  • Joyce

    I actually started with Non-Food Items a number of years ago. I didn’t know where to start with food, so I started with toiletries and other necessities. It seemed to give me confidence to move on to food items.:) I still have a lot more toilet paper than our family could use in many months. It keeps forever, so I continue to buy our favorite brand whenever it’s on sale.
    Thanks so much for your great site! I check on you gals daily.:)
    Joyce

  • As I have thought about this step, I have moved more to making things on my own – I have made my own cleaners for years, but now I also use baking soda and vinegar for shampoo and conditioner and have started making my own lotions and such. It is easier for me to store the basic ingredients for such things and make them as I am ready (how hard it is it to store baking soda and vinegar? – I use it in most of my cleaners, as a bath soak for dry skin, as shampoo/conditioner and in baking).

    • Shane Ahmann

      Do you have any recipes for shampoo and cleaning solutions?

  • As I have thought about this step, I have moved more to making things on my own – I have made my own cleaners for years, but now I also use baking soda and vinegar for shampoo and conditioner and have started making my own lotions and such. It is easier for me to store the basic ingredients for such things and make them as I am ready (how hard it is it to store baking soda and vinegar? – I use it in most of my cleaners, as a bath soak for dry skin, as shampoo/conditioner and in baking).

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