Types of Wheat

We have had a few questions lately about the difference between types of wheat. While we have touched on it before we thought it would be helpful to explain it in full detail for you in an individual post. There are three general classifications of wheat: Red vs. White, Hard vs. Soft, and Spring vs. Winter.

Red vs. White

Red wheat tends to have a stronger wheat flavor and produces a heavier denser bread than white wheat. Red wheats are typically the hard varieties and whites are typically soft. However if you prefer the flavor of one over the other you can find soft red and hard white. Experiment with different varieties in your recipes to find out what works best for you and your family.

Hard vs. Soft

Hard varieties of wheat are the most common and versatile. Hard wheat has a higher gluten (protein) than soft wheat. It is better for making breads, pastas, pancakes, etc. Soft varieties have lower protein and nutrients but are better for pastries and other items where a light fine flour is required.

Spring vs. Winter

Wheat is categorized by which season it is harvested in (either winter or spring). Winter wheat has a tiny bit less protein than spring wheat. Winter averages about 12% protein while spring wheat is closer to 14%. The winter wheat is a little harder than spring as well. Red winter wheat tends to be better for baking than red spring wheat. There isn’t much difference between winter and spring varieties of white wheats.

Our preferred variety of wheat to use is hard white (either winter or spring, whatever you can find). We don’t do much pastry cooking so the hard white has been great in everything we have tried to make. Our families don’t object to any of the meals or foods where we have replaced store-bought white flour with whole wheat hard white wheat flour. To view some of the success we’ve had with using our wheat visit our Wheat Recipes category page.

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  • Linwid59

    How much wheat does it take to make 10# of flour, using red wheat??

  • Linwid59

    How much wheat does it take to make 10# of flour, using red wheat??

    • http://www.best-registrycleaner.net registrycleaner

      Thank you for this clarification! It is just what this non-LDS, non-Utah LTS-newbie needed!

  • Susie

    Once a bucket of wheat has been opened what is its shelf life?or do I need to be concerned?

    • Jodi — Food Storage Made Easy

      Susie, It is good for about 3 years once opened. But hopefully you will be using it enough that you won’t have to worry about it!

  • Susie

    Once a bucket of wheat has been opened what is its shelf life?or do I need to be concerned?

  • Susie

    Once a bucket of wheat has been opened what is its shelf life?or do I need to be concerned?

  • Susie

    Once a bucket of wheat has been opened what is its shelf life?or do I need to be concerned?

    • Jodi — Food Storage Made Easy

      Susie, It is good for about 3 years once opened. But hopefully you will be using it enough that you won’t have to worry about it!

    • Brittany

      Actually the shelf life should be only 3 months. It DOES go bad, 3 years is way too long! Also make sure to sift the four before using it because if a recipe calls 16 ounces of flour and its not sifted you’re probably going to get too much flour in the recipe because you didn’t let it aerate.

      • Jessica Stitt

        3 months or less is the shelf life for flour. For wheat berries that
        are not ground, and properly stored, the shelf life is at least 3
        years.

  • Ami

    Thank you for this clarification! It is just what this non-LDS, non-Utah LTS-newbie needed!

  • Ami

    Thank you for this clarification! It is just what this non-LDS, non-Utah LTS-newbie needed!

  • Ami

    Thank you for this clarification! It is just what this non-LDS, non-Utah LTS-newbie needed!

  • Ami

    Thank you for this clarification! It is just what this non-LDS, non-Utah LTS-newbie needed!

  • HW

    Another thing I’ve heard is that you need hard wheat for any baking that has yeast in it, but soft wheat is sometimes preferred for baking that has baking powder or soda but no yeast. Personally, I just have hard red (because I can get it for free since my inlaws have way more than they need now their children have all left home) and hard white (because I like it better). If you have a lot of hard red wheat in your storage but like the white better, when you grind your wheat use half red and half white together (just grind at the same time) or two-thirds red to one-third white. This will lighten the flavor and texture of the hard red wheat.

  • HW

    Another thing I’ve heard is that you need hard wheat for any baking that has yeast in it, but soft wheat is sometimes preferred for baking that has baking powder or soda but no yeast. Personally, I just have hard red (because I can get it for free since my inlaws have way more than they need now their children have all left home) and hard white (because I like it better). If you have a lot of hard red wheat in your storage but like the white better, when you grind your wheat use half red and half white together (just grind at the same time) or two-thirds red to one-third white. This will lighten the flavor and texture of the hard red wheat.

  • gaby

    great information thanks!!!!

  • gaby

    great information thanks!!!!

  • gaby

    great information thanks!!!!