All About Powdered Eggs

Have you ever tried using Powdered Eggs in your recipes? Well we have and we were surprised! They actually taste good.  Our favorite thing about powdered eggs is to ALWAYS have eggs on hand.  No more running over to your neighbors house in a panic when you’re half way through a recipe and realize you are all out of eggs.


POWDERED-FACE

What are Powdered Eggs:

Powdered eggs are eggs that have been dehydrated and made into a simple powder, with a texture similar to that of powdered milk. While some brands of powdered eggs utilize the whole egg, others will only include the yolks or the whites, and may add other ingredients to enhance the flavor or the texture of the reconstituted eggs. Generally, it is possible to purchase powdered eggs in bulk, making them ideal for use in food storage programs.

Advantages of Powdered Eggs:

Dehydrated eggs have several advantages over fresh eggs.

First, powdered eggs have a longer shelf life. With proper storage, dried eggs can easily last for the better part of a decade. It is not necessary to store the eggs in a refrigerated area; all that is required is a cool to moderate temperature and a dark cabinet or cupboard.

Eggs that have been dried require much less storage space. This means substantial supplies of eggs can be kept on hand in a relatively small space. Re-hydrating the eggs for use in omelets and to make scrambled eggs require nothing other than the addition of a liquid, usually water or milk. In powdered form, the eggs can be added to baked recipes without the need to mix them with a liquid ahead of time.

Finally, powdered eggs are pasteurized so they are perfectly healthy to eat RAW without concerns about salmonella. So if you are a cookie dough eater, powdered eggs can save the day!

Using Powdered Eggs:

Powdered Whole Eggs are a great replacement for regular eggs in baking. Most recipes can be substituted with no problems, but you can check out our powdered eggs recipe category for ideas of recipes we’ve used where they work great.

Scrambled Egg Mixes are processed a little differently than regular whole eggs and are better suited for making scrambled eggs or omelets. They are delicious and much better than any other egg substitute product. You can use them for camping mixes, or store them for your long term food storage.

Some recipes call for just egg whites or just egg yolks. If you’d like to make those recipes in a powerless emergency situation you can purchase them from stores like Honeyville Grain. We’ve used powdered egg whites as diet food as they are cheaper and more convenient than separating egg whites out to reduce the fat content.

History Lesson:

The production of powdered eggs is usually traced back to the first half of the 20th century. The eggs were extensively used during World War II, especially in countries where food supplies were airlifted in to feed civilians displaced by occupations and bombings. In the United States, powdered eggs were often used as a substitute for fresh eggs during periods of rationing, allowing fresh eggs to be routed to provide nutrition to people serving in the military. Even with first call on fresh eggs, many branches of the military also utilized the powdered versions as a matter of expediency.


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  • bassoon-mamma

    I am wondering. I once used some dry egg powder in a recipe. It might have been a few years old, sitting in the cupboard, not in original packaging. (My mom gave me some to sample) After eating the item I baked, a few hours or a day later, my whole family had the worst gas on the planet!!!! Is this normal? I am NEVER using powdered eggs again unless someone can convince me otherwise! Maybe the powder was bad. I don’t know. Does anyone want to comment on this? Ha Ha! Thanks.

    • StandleyMama

      More than likely it was because the egg powder was old and an opened container.  Even with regular eggs, if they are old they can cause gas problems for some people.  Should you try it again, make sure the egg powder is new.

      • Tikvah Duesterbeck

        no, that’s a speculation. It will last longer than you think

    • Tikvah Duesterbeck

      lolol… yes eggs do give you gas. that’s for sure.

  • Definitely a good point! And I feel comfortable letting my kiddos help in the kitchen more without worrying about them getting into raw eggs. 🙂

  • One of my favorite things about powdered eggs is that when I use them I don't have to feel guilty about eating the cookie dough (because there are no raw eggs in it!)

  • One of my favorite things about powdered eggs is that when I use them I don’t have to feel guilty about eating the cookie dough (because there are no raw eggs in it!)

    • Definitely a good point! And I feel comfortable letting my kiddos help in the kitchen more without worrying about them getting into raw eggs. 🙂

  • pfloyd

    costco carries organic cold milled ground flax seed which is an excellent egg substitute. It comes in a 40oz canister and is around 11.00 but it gives you your omega 3. I have been adding it in my breads, smoothies etc. It gives you the egg replacement conversion right on the lable and it can also replace margarine or butter in recipes. I have found this to be an excellent addition to my food storage.
    Here are some other egg replacers if you have no powdered eggs or flax and are in a pinch:
    All equal 1 egg
    1tsp Baking Powder + 1Tbsp liquid + 1Tbsp vinegar
    or
    1tsp yeast dissolved in 1/4 C warm water
    or
    1Tbsp apricot puree
    or
    1 1/2 Tbsp water + 1 1/2 Tbsp oil + 1tsp Baking Powder (our favorite)
    or 1 packet gelatin + 2Tbsp warm water

  • Anonymous

    costco carries organic cold milled ground flax seed which is an excellent egg substitute. It comes in a 40oz canister and is around 11.00 but it gives you your omega 3. I have been adding it in my breads, smoothies etc. It gives you the egg replacement conversion right on the lable and it can also replace margarine or butter in recipes. I have found this to be an excellent addition to my food storage.
    Here are some other egg replacers if you have no powdered eggs or flax and are in a pinch:
    All equal 1 egg
    1tsp Baking Powder + 1Tbsp liquid + 1Tbsp vinegar
    or
    1tsp yeast dissolved in 1/4 C warm water
    or
    1Tbsp apricot puree
    or
    1 1/2 Tbsp water + 1 1/2 Tbsp oil + 1tsp Baking Powder (our favorite)
    or 1 packet gelatin + 2Tbsp warm water

  • pfloyd

    costco carries organic cold milled ground flax seed which is an excellent egg substitute. It comes in a 40oz canister and is around 11.00 but it gives you your omega 3. I have been adding it in my breads, smoothies etc. It gives you the egg replacement conversion right on the lable and it can also replace margarine or butter in recipes. I have found this to be an excellent addition to my food storage.
    Here are some other egg replacers if you have no powdered eggs or flax and are in a pinch:
    All equal 1 egg
    1tsp Baking Powder + 1Tbsp liquid + 1Tbsp vinegar
    or
    1tsp yeast dissolved in 1/4 C warm water
    or
    1Tbsp apricot puree
    or
    1 1/2 Tbsp water + 1 1/2 Tbsp oil + 1tsp Baking Powder (our favorite)
    or 1 packet gelatin + 2Tbsp warm water

  • Anonymous

    I love powdered eggs too. Another great use for them is making your own mixes. I’ve posted a few recipes on my site.

  • foodstoragegirl

    I love powdered eggs too. Another great use for them is making your own mixes. I've posted a few recipes on my site.

  • Kathryn, I would probably take the plastic bag and put it inside some sort of sealed container. If you have empty #10 cans around that would be a great way to use them. Or you could just use a tupperware container that would fit the bag inside. I think the shelf life will be extended a bit that way. Great question!

  • Anonymous

    Since only a few tablespoons of the egg powder is necessary for a single recipe (usually), once I’ve opened my box, how long will it last? It’s only a paper bag on the inside, which I fold over (much like I do a cereal box bag). Maybe I should seal it better to help it last longer? What do you think? It’s such an expensive product, in California at least, that I’d hate to waste any.

    • Kathryn, I would probably take the plastic bag and put it inside some sort of sealed container. If you have empty #10 cans around that would be a great way to use them. Or you could just use a tupperware container that would fit the bag inside. I think the shelf life will be extended a bit that way. Great question!

  • kathryn79

    Since only a few tablespoons of the egg powder is necessary for a single recipe (usually), once I've opened my box, how long will it last? It's only a paper bag on the inside, which I fold over (much like I do a cereal box bag). Maybe I should seal it better to help it last longer? What do you think? It's such an expensive product, in California at least, that I'd hate to waste any.

  • I got powdered eggs from the Macey's case lot sale. I can't remember the exact price but when I had calculated it out they were a bit cheaper than fresh eggs.

  • HW

    When I did the math, powdered eggs were not cheaper for me than fresh eggs (I live outside Utah), especially since I get fresh eggs on sale most of the time. I still have some in my food storage, though, because I’ll want them for baking and cooking in an emergency!

  • Mom of 4

    I’m just curious — where do you usually buy your powdered eggs? When I compare prices of Honeyville’s eggs to the fresh ones from Sam’s Club, the powdered ones are nearly double Sam’s price. That said, I still keep plenty of powdered eggs around for storage purposes.

    • I got powdered eggs from the Macey’s case lot sale. I can’t remember the exact price but when I had calculated it out they were a bit cheaper than fresh eggs.

  • HW

    When I did the math, powdered eggs were not cheaper for me than fresh eggs (I live outside Utah), especially since I get fresh eggs on sale most of the time. I still have some in my food storage, though, because I'll want them for baking and cooking in an emergency!

  • Mom of 4

    I'm just curious — where do you usually buy your powdered eggs? When I compare prices of Honeyville's eggs to the fresh ones from Sam's Club, the powdered ones are nearly double Sam's price. That said, I still keep plenty of powdered eggs around for storage purposes.