Food Storage Substitutions

When considering which items to store in your long term food storage, it’s beneficial to consider what bulk items you could store that would serve multiple purposes. This can help save space as you avoid storing unnecessary items, and many times you can extend the shelf life of items by making them out of ingredients with longer shelf lives.

Food Storage Substitutions:

softbrown500Brown Sugar = 1 c. white sugar + 1-2 T. molasses
White sugar and molasses are already on our list of storage items, so if you plan to store brown sugar as well, just store a little extra of these items. Molasses has a longer shelf life than brown sugar, and you don’t have the problem of it getting clumpy and hardened since you will be making it fresh.

6a00d83451fa5069e200e54f6196468833-800wiButtermilk = 1 c. milk or powdered milk + 1 T. vinegar
This is so much easier than having to keep buttermilk or powdered buttermilk on hand when you need it for a particular recipe. Vinegar can also be used in baking recipes, to improve your bread recipes, as well as for homemade cleaning supplies. So these two items should definitely be part of your food storage already!

davisbakingpowderBaking Powder = 1 tsp. baking soda + 2 tsp. cream of tartar
While you may not think of storing cream of tartar, this actually makes a lot of sense. Both baking soda and cream of tartar can have an indefinite shelf life if stored in airtight containers at room temperature. Baking powder, however has a short shelf life of 6-12 months. To test if your baking powder is still active, stir 1 teaspoon into ½ a cup of hot water. If it doesn’t bubble, it will need to be replaced.

  • Xara

    Wow! It sure helps me, because no buttermilk I ever saw at any supermarkets in my country.
    But, there are things that made me confused. In “Buttermilk = 1 c. milk or powdered milk + 1 T. vinegar” what does “c.” and “T.” means?Could you please describe them?Thank you.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      c is CUP, and T is tablespoon. I hope that helps.

      • Xara

        It sure did. Much obligate :)

        • rottiff

          common U.S.A measurements
          abbreviations for a tablespoon are: tbs. or T
          a non-capitalized ‘t’ is a teaspoon. also shown as tsps., tsp. or t.
          1 t. = 5ml.
          3 tsps. = 1 tbs.
          16 tbs. = 1 cup
          2 cups = 1 pt./pint
          2 pts. = 1 qt./quart
          4 qts. = 1 gal./gallon

  • http://onlinediscprinting.com/ CD Printers

    Great set of food storage tips! This can definitely save a lot of money.

  • http://onlinediscprinting.com/ CD Printers

    Great set of food storage tips! This can definitely save a lot of money.

  • Irmaggivin

    So what you are saying is that in a receipt , like a bread receipt, that calls for 1 egg, I would use 1/4 cup of applesauce?

  • derikson

    Don't forget egg substitutes: 1/4 applesauce in baked goods per egg works well.

  • Anonymous

    Don’t forget egg substitutes: 1/4 applesauce in baked goods per egg works well.

    • Irmaggivin

      So what you are saying is that in a receipt , like a bread receipt, that calls for 1 egg, I would use 1/4 cup of applesauce?

  • derikson

    Don't forget egg substitutes: 1/4 applesauce in baked goods per egg works well.

  • Anonymous

    This is a great post. I use the buttermilk substitution every time I use a recipe calling for buttermilk, as it is very uncommon and expensive if you do find it over here.

  • KarenButtle

    This is a great post. I use the buttermilk substitution every time I use a recipe calling for buttermilk, as it is very uncommon and expensive if you do find it over here.