All About Honey … Yummy!

By now you all have probably figured out that Julie is the “healthy” one and I like treats. So whatever your style is you should be able to resonate with one or the other of us 😉 Well storing honey in our food storage gives Julie a healthy option as a replacement for white sugar, and gives Jodi a delicious option for making yummy treats! It’s a win-win for us on the food storage front.


All About Honey in your Food Storage

How much honey should I store

According to most food storage calculators it is recommended to store 60 pounds total of sugars/sweeteners per year per adult. Our calculator uses the common recommendation of just 3 pounds of honey per person. However, we both use honey in our basic bread recipes so we have chosen to store a little bit more than that. Some people feel that for health reasons they would rather store more honey than refined white sugar so obviously they would also up their honey storage amount. As you start using your food storage more and baking a lot from scratch you may find that you prefer to cook with honey and thus want to up your own storage amount as well.

What are the different types of honey

Raw – Unheated honey that has been removed from the comb. It may contain bits of wax, insect parts and other small debris. Raw honey contains small amounts of vitamins and minerals that are not in white sugar.

Filtered – Raw honey that has been warmed slightly to make it easier to filter out small particles and impurities. Filtered honey is almost the same as raw, just a little cleaner. Most of the small amounts of nutrients remain.

Liquid – Honey that has been heated to higher temperatures to allow for easier filtering and to kill any microorganisms. Usually lighter in color, this form is milder in flavor, resists crystallization and is generally clearer than raw honey. Much of the trace amounts of vitamins are lost in this processing.

Crystallized or Spun – This honey has had some of its moisture content removed to make a creamy, spread. It is the most processed form of honey.

How do I replace honey for sugar in a recipe?*

To bake with Honey:
Use pure raw honey for up to half of the sugar in the recipe
For each cup of honey used: reduce the liquid by 1/2 cup
Add 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
Reduce oven temperature by 25 degrees

To cook with honey:
For sauces, marinades, and salad dressings substitute pure honey for up to half the sugar in the recipe.
1 cup of sugar =1/3 to 1/2 cup honey. (If it is a stronger honey you would use 1/3 cup. If it is milder use 1/2 cup)

*Info found at Cox Honeyland website

What are some good food storage recipes using honey?

Where can I get honey in bulk?

Please note: Prices are current at the time of this posting.

  • Emergency Essentials sells honey in a #10 can size for $40.95 which is about 9 pounds of honey.
  • Honeyville Grain sells a variety of kinds of honey in a wide range of sizes.
  • Rainy Day Foods has grade A honey in 45 lb buckets or 5 lb pails.
  • Cox Honeyland sells pure raw honey in lots of different sizes from small containers up to 60 lb buckets.
  • Thrive Life sells Honey Crystals which can be used in baking and you won’t have to worry about crystallization. A #10 Can is $16.19.


  • Kathy Stonestreet

    I buy local honey from Whole Foods, which is cheaper, than most places, and bring it home and store it in wide mouth canning jars. It keeps wonderfully

  • Tiffany

    Does it matter what kind on honey you put in your food storage?  Does one last longer.  I bought raw honey one time in a small jar and eventually it grew mold on the honey. 

    • That’s odd, I’ve always heard honey will last for a LONNNNNNNNNNNNNNG time. Could something have gotten in there and “contaminated” it?

      • Longmane

        I have heard that this can happen if the water content of the honey is too high. Processed liquid honey typically has some of the water removed to improve its keeping qualities (inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria). I guess for everyday use, I’d prefer raw honey, but for storage, I’d use liquid. Has anyone tried using a solar dehydrator to thicken or dehydrate honey?

  • Barb

    I get honey from Walgreens on sale-two dollars a pound.  Have stored alot over time, not only replaces sugar but it is wonderful for your health and can be used on burns.

  • Ronnie Findley

    Very interesting

  • Helen

    I tried reconstituting honey powder according to the directions, to use on biscuits. I didn't turn out well — the powder didn't dissolve well, and it was thin & runny. I haven't tried using it dry in recipes yet. Maybe it would be good mixed with butter??

  • Amy Plastow

    Have you ever used honey powder? I found some at my grocery store and bought two cans, but I haven't dared to use it yet. It sounded like a good idea at the time though

  • Amy Plastow

    Have you ever used honey powder? I found some at my grocery store and bought two cans, but I haven’t dared to use it yet. It sounded like a good idea at the time though

    • Helen

      I tried reconstituting honey powder according to the directions, to use on biscuits. I didn’t turn out well — the powder didn’t dissolve well, and it was thin & runny. I haven’t tried using it dry in recipes yet. Maybe it would be good mixed with butter??

  • Helen

    How do you deal with honey crystallizing? In the past I have stored the 6 lb. jugs of honey from Costco, but I am gradually switching over to agave nectar because of issues with the honey crystallizing. Even if I heat the honey jug in a pan of boiling water to decrystallize the honey (which is a pain), it ends up recrystallizing and I have to repeat the process.

  • Lisa

    Question? Under the “To Bake with Honey” section…should it read…For each cup of SUGAR used: reduce the liquid by 1/2 cup instead of For each cup of honey used: reduce the liquid by 1/2 cup? Just checking….

  • Helen

    How do you deal with honey crystallizing? In the past I have stored the 6 lb. jugs of honey from Costco, but I am gradually switching over to agave nectar because of issues with the honey crystallizing. Even if I heat the honey jug in a pan of boiling water to decrystallize the honey (which is a pain), it ends up recrystallizing and I have to repeat the process.

    • leal

      Not sure if this question was ever answered or if Helen found the answer. When I got married in 1983, we were given 4 half gallons of raw, filtered honey that was completely crystallized. I was ecstatic as crystallized honey will last forever it seems. When I wanted liquid honey, I used a spoon to remove as much crystallized honey as I wanted, put in a jar with a lid and set it in a pan of warm water. I let it sit until it is liquid and use as needed.

  • Lisa

    Question? Under the “To Bake with Honey” section…should it read…For each cup of SUGAR used: reduce the liquid by 1/2 cup instead of For each cup of honey used: reduce the liquid by 1/2 cup? Just checking….