Step 5: Grains

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Purchase your year supply of grains and learn how to use them: wheat, corn, barley, rice, pasta, etc.

Key Points

  • Grains are used to create the foundation, and a wide variety of foods in your long-term food storage.
  • It is recommended that half your daily grain intake be WHOLE grains due to the high nutritional value and protein levels (examples include: whole wheat, oats, brown rice, etc).
  • Accumulate recipes that include grains. Using your grains will help you rotate through them, and get your family used to eating them.
  • Even though we talk about each grain separately, we find that WHEAT GRINDING is the major hang up for most people! Learn why NOT to be intimidated by wheat grinders by checking out our wheat grinder post and how-to video. Don’t use this as an excuse to not start this step!
  • When you are ready to purchase a wheat grinder, view our WonderMill Grain Mill page to see how we have become authorized dealers in order to get you the best possible prices available.
  • Determine the quantities of each food item you will need to store. For more information, see BabyStep 4.

Rolled Oats

  • Uses – Breakfasts, granola, cookies, filler in meat loafs or casseroles, thickener for soups/stews.
  • Types – Quick rolled oats or regular rolled oats. Quick oats cook faster but regular oats retain flavor and nutrition better.
  • Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is up to 8 years. If opened should be used within 1 year. We recommend storing large amounts in an airtight plastic container and pulling out a smaller amount every few months for your actual usage/rotation.

Wheat

  • Uses – Wheat grass, appetizers, desserts, breakfast cereals, crackers, brownies, tortillas, breads, pancakes, muffins, cakes, snacks, in salads, to make vegetarian meat/protein, and any other baking item you would use flour for.
  • Types – Spring or winter, hard or soft, red or white. Hard varieties have higher gluten (protein) and are better for making breads. Soft varieties have lower protein and nutrients but are better for pastries, pastas, and breakfast cereals. Red wheats are typically hard and whites are typically soft. However if you prefer the flavor of one over the other you can find soft red and hard white. Experiment with different varieties in your recipes to find out what works best for you.
  • Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is 12 years or more. If opened will last about 3 years. However, once ground into flour, wheat loses most of its nutrients within a few days so only grind small amounts at a time. You can add oxygen absorbers, bay leaves, or dry ice to help keep critters out of your wheat.

Spaghetti or Macaroni

  • Uses – As a main course, in casseroles, in soups.
  • Types – You can store any type of pasta you like to use, the main ones sold in bulk are macaroni and spaghetti so they are convenient for long-term storage.
  • Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is 8-10 years. If opened will last about 2 years. If you buy it in plastic bags we recommend transferring your pasta to airtight plastic containers for better storage.

Cornmeal

  • Uses – Grits, cornbread/muffins, mush, jonnycake, hushpuppies, breading on fried items.
  • Types – Steel ground or stone ground. Most common is steel ground, it has husk and germ almost all removed. Loses flavor and nutrients but has a long shelf life. This is what you will find at the grocery store. Stone ground retains more of the husk and germ but is more perishable. Cornmeal can be found in white, yellow, red, and blue varieties. Yellow and white are the most common.
  • Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is 5 years. If opened will last about 1 year.

Enriched White Flour

  • Uses – Cakes, biscuits, pie crusts, pastries, gravy, thickener, puddings.
  • Types – Bleached or unbleached. Both have had their bran and germ portions removed and are “enriched” by adding back some of the lost nutrients. Bleached has been treated with chlorine, while unbleached is aged and bleached naturally by oxygen in the air.
  • Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is 5 years. If opened will last about 6-8 months.

Enriched White Rice

  • Uses – Rice pudding, cereal, casseroles, side dishes.
  • Types – Bleached or unbleached. Both have had their bran and germ portions removed and are “enriched” by adding back some of the lost nutrients. Bleached has been chemically bleached while unbleached goes through a natural bleaching process.
  • Storage – Shelf life is 30 years.

Pearled Barley

  • Uses – Thickener in soups and stews, in sides or casseroles similar to how you would use rice.
  • Types – You can buy pot barley which retains more of the nutritious germ and brand, but it has a shorter shelf life. Pearled barley is recommended for long-term food storage.
  • Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is 8 years. If opened will last 18 months.

More Information

Where to Buy Grains

Helpful Products

WONDERMILL GRAIN MILL:  An electric mill is an important tool for rotating and practicing using all of your grains, not just wheat.
WONDER JUNIOR DELUXE:  A manual wheat grinder is useful for powerless emergencies and also to grind oily items like nuts and seeds.
BOSCH MIXERS:  If you are planning to get into bread baking with your wheat, a Bosch mixer will be a great tool to add to your kitchen.

 

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  • What about quinoa and some of the other “older” grains?

    • We’ve done a few posts on quinoa lately. We need to update this page!

  • Kari Koob

    Oops!? For enriched white rice, you say “optimum shelf life is 30 years. If opened will last indefinitely” — is that a typo? All other grains have a shorter shelf life once they’re opened.

  • Crystal

    Jodi and Julie, Love your info and emails.  I store and package my own food in buckets and in mylar bags.  My new adventure is storing white corn grits in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.  However, I am having a really hard time finding out the true shelf life of my grits after I have sealed them in my mylar bags.  From what I can tell is that my grits are similar to corn meal.  Shelf Reliance is showing their corn meal to have unopened shelf life of 5 years, Augason Farms is showing their corn meal to have a shelf life of 30 years.  Hummmm, so I wonder what my shelf life would be?  Any help would be appreciated. 

    • Hmm I have not heard of cornmeal with that long of a shelf life. One of the benefits of storing the whole kernels is that it has a MUCH longer shelf life. I’m not sure how Augason Farms is claiming that. I would expect that your corn grits would be somewhere in the 5 year range if they are indeed similar to cornmeal. Once opened it will be even less too. Good luck on your adventures!

      • Barb

        I also just bought a 23lb bucket of quick oats from Augason Farms and it claims to have a shelf life of 30 years. It just arrived and I realized it is not even in mylar, within the bucket. I don’t know if I should repackage it into mylar or return it. I have only seen a shelf life of 5-8 years from other companies, so I am confused.

  • Sixnonblnd

    do i need to put oxgen tads when i store rice in 2 litters

    • I don’t think a two liter bottle would have a tight enough seal for oxygen absorbers to be effective. I would just store them regular and try to rotate within a few years. Hope that helps!

  • Clbds777

    HELP… so new to this.  Bought 20lb bags of white rice and unsure how to store.  My head is spinning from all the advice out there… so what truly is the best way to store it for a year? 2 years? or 5 years?

    • If you are storing for 2-3 years you should be fine just sticking it in 5 gallon buckets (make sure they are food grade). If you are looking for longer term storage I would buy some oxygen absorbers and insert them into the buckets to help increase the shelf life. Hope that helps!

  • Frank

    Enriched White Flour
    Uses – Cakes, biscuits, etc. Types – Bleached or unbleached. —- chlorine, while unbleached is aged and bleached naturally by oxygen in the air. Storage – If unopened, optimum shelf life is 5 years. If opened will last about 6-8 months.
    “if unopened”  what possible protection is an un-opened bag or box, they provide no barrier to air infiltration.

  • Richfab4

    A friend at work just found out rats have no problem getting into cans.  Keep cats close and buy mason jars.

  • charles

    you made me hungry gonna cook rightnow. nice work ladies. I’ve got a lot to do, and you’re planning is going to help Alot! thx

  • bethalope

    why is quiona not listed?  It’s a complete protein, easy to cook and delicious!

    • These are just the ones listed on basic food storage calculators. We definitely recommend that people experiment with other grains and quinoa is one of our favorites!

  • Richfab4

    Just remember insects are easy, mice & rats will get thru plastic and mylar bags.  Keep cats around the plastic containers.  Cans and glass containers are rodent proof but have their problems.  Cans can rust and glass can break.  Im putting alot of my dry goods in mason jars. Publix has the best price for quart ones and Ace has the larger sizes for two dollars a piece(comes in six pack).  Cans can be waxed.

    • Barb

      Another idea to keep around plastic containers is mint leaves to deter bugs/mice.

  • benedictus

    Have a question about long term food storage for grains. Normal storage is 5 gallon bucket, mylar bag and oxygen absorber. Could you package (10) 1 gallon mylar bags of grain then put it in the 5 gallon bucket? That way you only take out what you need without disturbing the freshness of the rest of the grain in the bucket. The only negative I can see to this is extra costs of extra mylar bags. Any thoughts? If you only use (1) big mylar bag, what happens to all the grain in the bucket when you open the bucket multiple times to retrieve what you need? Do you add another oxygen absorber each time you open it? Thanks!

    • I think it’s a great idea to split it into multiple mylar bags. Basically
      once you open a bucket/bag you lose the benefit of the oxygen absorber. The
      idea is that you may have 10 buckets sitting there in storage and as you
      rotate through it you will open one at a time. It may take a year or two to
      rotate through a bucket of wheat, but that one bucket will be fine left
      without being so carefully preserved for just a year or two. It’s the
      buckets that will not be opened for 20 years that you need to worry about.
      If you think that you will go through it more slowly then that, another
      option is to store in #10 cans so you only have 1 can opened at a time. Or
      else your mylar bag inside a bucket option would work well also. Hope that
      helps a bit!

    • KT

      Wheat can be stored in 6 gallon buckets lined with a mylar bag.   A 6 gallon bucket can hold about 46 pounds of wheat berries.  I get my 6 gallon buckets, lids, and mylar bags from USA Emergency Supply.  An alternative to your question would be to break down your wheat storage into smaller bags, but it would be more cost effective to use a vacuum sealer and vacuum sealer bags with oxygen absorbers in them.  They are cheaper than mylar bags.  Then each vacuum sealed bag can be stored in your mylar lined 6-gallon bucket. You can choose a size bag that work for you.  If this would be your active bucket, I’d recommend using a gamma seal lid on it.  You could use a more permanent lid on your longer term storage wheat.  If you use a lower quality vacuum sealer like a Food Saver, their bags are thinner and more likely to puncture when sealing hard products such as wheat and rice.  However you can reduce the risk of this happening when the bags are smashed against each other in storage by wrapping each finished vacuum sealed bag in a layer or 2 of saran wrap.  A nicer near commercial quality vacuum sealer for home use is a Weston Pro 2300, that uses thicker better quality bags.  You can also use the food saver mason jar adapter with the Weston.  Lastly, food stored in vacuum sealed bags with oxygen absorbers doesn’t have to be stored in buckets, which are less conducive to efficient space usage when storing bagged food.  You can get a giant dark opaque rubbermaid tub, put a couple 6 gallon mylar bags in there, and then put your vacuum sealed bags in those.  This would be good for dry food you intend to use in 1-2 years.

  • Nini2033a

    Quinoa, Millet, Sorghum, Amaranth,Buckwheat, Teff, …. You forgot a few. Many of us are either celiac or gluten intolerant/allergic and need to use alternative grains.
    You can make just about anything with rice flour, mix it with sorghum and you have something that tastes more like corn bread, Teff and buckwheat are good for heartier tasting breads, Millet makes delightful muffins and quick breads, all the above can make breads, crackers, noodles,,,,, just remember if you are gluten free, you need to mix flours for better results.

    • Thanks for the additional information. We only listed the ones here that are listed in the common food storage calculators but we have been enjoying learning about all of the different grains ourselves over the past few months. We are getting ready to do some posts on gluten-free food storage and will definitely be adding to this info.

  • To store all of these things, you need a good number of reliable airtight storage containers? But wouldn’t you need a chest freezer or something? Or some kind of chiller? But then how would you keep the moisture out of the containers?

  • Buckster2

    Will some of these items last longer if in the freezer??

    • Typically cooler temperatures extend shelf life, but I’m not sure how feasible it is to store large quantities in the freezer.

  • misty

    hi

  • misty

    hi

  • misty

    hi

  • Nancy

    Hi,
    If you are still looking for information on Dr. Wright, go to one of Sally Fallon’s sites and she discusses him all the time.
    NM

  • Nancy

    Hi,
    If you are still looking for information on Dr. Wright, go to one of Sally Fallon's sites and she discusses him all the time.
    NM

  • In the bags in a tupperware they should be fine for 9 months for sure. The airtight containers and oxygen absorbers are more for if you don't plan to use it or open it for 3-5 years or more.

  • Anonymous

    When you say “if unopened, optimum shelf life is …”, does this count for the 25 lb wheat bags bought at the cannery? I use about 1 bag a month so am purchasing enough for the next 9 months before we move so need to know if I can just leave in the bags in a tupperward in the basement or should I transfer to a bucket with oxygen absorbers or how do you recommend I store these?

    • In the bags in a tupperware they should be fine for 9 months for sure. The airtight containers and oxygen absorbers are more for if you don’t plan to use it or open it for 3-5 years or more.

  • jamiegilson

    When you say “if unopened, optimum shelf life is …”, does this count for the 25 lb wheat bags bought at the cannery? I use about 1 bag a month so am purchasing enough for the next 9 months before we move so need to know if I can just leave in the bags in a tupperward in the basement or should I transfer to a bucket with oxygen absorbers or how do you recommend I store these?

  • Robert

    I love Quinoa as well !! It is great for all meals and comes in a white or red varieties. High in protein and fiber it is definitely a shelf staple -easy to prepare and transport- at home or on the trail. I just need to find it in a less expensive bulk form in my area.

  • Don’t for get to check out Quinoa {keen wa} often called the superfood because it is loaded with Amino acids and proteins as well as almost every vit and mineral you can think of. Has a nutty flavor and can be eaten like oatmeal or added to scrambled eggs , salads, soups, or anywhere else you can imagine.I found it today in the health food section at hy vee so it is out there and easy to find. try it out!

    • Robert

      I love Quinoa as well !! It is great for all meals and comes in a white or red varieties. High in protein and fiber it is definitely a shelf staple -easy to prepare and transport- at home or on the trail. I just need to find it in a less expensive bulk form in my area.

  • Don't for get to check out Quinoa {keen wa} often called the superfood because it is loaded with Amino acids and proteins as well as almost every vit and mineral you can think of. Has a nutty flavor and can be eaten like oatmeal or added to scrambled eggs , salads, soups, or anywhere else you can imagine.I found it today in the health food section at hy vee so it is out there and easy to find. try it out!

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  • If you explore our sister site http://thefoodstorageshopper.net she goes into a lot more detail on different sources for bulk grain purchases. We're a bit spoiled by living in Utah and haven't had a chance to delve into that topic as much as she has. Hope that helps!

  • Anonymous

    Can you recommend some good sources for bulk grain purchases? I’ve had trouble finding a supplier where shipping doesn’t double the cost!! Thanks!

  • meggan

    Can you recommend some good sources for bulk grain purchases? I've had trouble finding a supplier where shipping doesn't double the cost!! Thanks!

  • Lisa H.

    I have learned an important lesson about rotating food storage. Items that don’t have a long shelf-life, such as flour or oil, should be rotated regularly. If you open one of these items when it is near the end of its shelf-life, it does not last in the cupboard very long before going rancid.

  • Lisa H.

    I have learned an important lesson about rotating food storage. Items that don’t have a long shelf-life, such as flour or oil, should be rotated regularly. If you open one of these items when it is near the end of its shelf-life, it does not last in the cupboard very long before going rancid.

  • debbie

    have you thought of storing quinoa? i heard somewhere that it is the only grain that is a complete protein. it is also very tasty.

  • debbie

    have you thought of storing quinoa? i heard somewhere that it is the only grain that is a complete protein. it is also very tasty.

  • jweiss08

    Rebecca,

    Andrea at The Obsessive Shopper talks about this.
    http://theobsessiveshopper.net/?p=544
    Check it out.

  • jweiss08

    Rebecca,

    Andrea at The Obsessive Shopper talks about this.
    http://theobsessiveshopper.net/?p=544
    Check it out.

  • Rebecca

    There is not a Cannery near me. Could you please give me a website to order the wheat, dry milk and eggs. Thanks

  • Rebecca

    There is not a Cannery near me. Could you please give me a website to order the wheat, dry milk and eggs. Thanks

  • Theresa

    Jodi,

    Thanks for your advice! I already keep 3-4 loaves of store made bread in the freezer on a regular basis, but I almost never bake and would like to start. I am considering continuing the frozen bread storage + storing 3 months worth of flour for bread and other baked goods, and then enough wheat and whole grains to cover the rest of the year. I have no bread baking skills…do you have a bread machine recommendation? I’m having trouble finding them where I live. Thanks, again!

  • Theresa

    Jodi,

    Thanks for your advice! I already keep 3-4 loaves of store made bread in the freezer on a regular basis, but I almost never bake and would like to start. I am considering continuing the frozen bread storage + storing 3 months worth of flour for bread and other baked goods, and then enough wheat and whole grains to cover the rest of the year. I have no bread baking skills…do you have a bread machine recommendation? I’m having trouble finding them where I live. Thanks, again!

  • Jodi

    Dori, you could try the oxygen absorbers but I don’t if they would be very effective since the 2-liter bottles won’t have an airtight seal. I probably wouldn’t bother using them and just make sure through those foods.

    Theresa, the recommendation is to store a small amount of flour and a LOT of wheat. Wheat has a 30 year shelf life so it wouldn’t hurt to have some of it on hand. Honestly you probably wouldn’t be able to go through the flour fast enough before it expires and then you would be throwing a lot away. You could probably replace SOME wheat with flour, but I wouldn’t replace all of it. If you have a good electric grinder you can grind a week’s worth of flour in just 5 minutes or so and then store it in your freezer to help retain the nutrients. This will help you rotate it and it will be healthier for your family too!

  • Jodi

    Dori, you could try the oxygen absorbers but I don’t if they would be very effective since the 2-liter bottles won’t have an airtight seal. I probably wouldn’t bother using them and just make sure through those foods.

    Theresa, the recommendation is to store a small amount of flour and a LOT of wheat. Wheat has a 30 year shelf life so it wouldn’t hurt to have some of it on hand. Honestly you probably wouldn’t be able to go through the flour fast enough before it expires and then you would be throwing a lot away. You could probably replace SOME wheat with flour, but I wouldn’t replace all of it. If you have a good electric grinder you can grind a week’s worth of flour in just 5 minutes or so and then store it in your freezer to help retain the nutrients. This will help you rotate it and it will be healthier for your family too!

  • Theresa

    Just wondering…does the grain storage have to be unground wheat or can it be flour? I just don’t have the time to grind wheat on a weekly basis, and I have discovered the flour at the store has at least a year expiration dating on it. I don’t want to buy a product I won’t be able to rotate. Thanks!

  • Theresa

    Just wondering…does the grain storage have to be unground wheat or can it be flour? I just don’t have the time to grind wheat on a weekly basis, and I have discovered the flour at the store has at least a year expiration dating on it. I don’t want to buy a product I won’t be able to rotate. Thanks!

  • Dori

    Can you use 2 liter bottles for oat or rice with oxygen absorbers?

  • Dori

    Can you use 2 liter bottles for oat or rice with oxygen absorbers?

  • candace

    Something I just learned is to sprinkle diatomaceous earth in your grains, rice, or whatever to kill any bugs. It works in a mechanical fashion and is harmless to humans. It is an anti-caking agent found in all kinds of food-like bisquick. It has a lot of other uses to and it is inexpensive.

  • candace

    Something I just learned is to sprinkle diatomaceous earth in your grains, rice, or whatever to kill any bugs. It works in a mechanical fashion and is harmless to humans. It is an anti-caking agent found in all kinds of food-like bisquick. It has a lot of other uses to and it is inexpensive.

  • Angel

    ALSO You can find buckets to store things at Emergency Essentials, Home Depot (look for the correct symbol for food storage) and I purchased
    20 square buckets from a friut processing plant with lids to use. Just clean and dry them well.
    They were 50 cents a piece. Also check bakeries and restaurants for their food buckets.

  • Angel

    ALSO You can find buckets to store things at Emergency Essentials, Home Depot (look for the correct symbol for food storage) and I purchased
    20 square buckets from a friut processing plant with lids to use. Just clean and dry them well.
    They were 50 cents a piece. Also check bakeries and restaurants for their food buckets.

  • Angel

    I have purchased the WonderMill JR Deluxe but haven’t gotten it home yet.
    I studied a long time the options and the grinder I really wants was the Country Living Grain Mill but it hovers at $500 with the attachments I wanted.

    The WonderMill seemed to be a great alternative at less than apx half the cost.

    My grains are stored in a variety of ways including SuperBuckets from Emergency Essentials to #10 cans purchased through the LDS site and in 25# bags from Bob’s Red Mill and Costco.

    I heard recently that they upped the lifetime of flour to 20 years (if I remember correctly) but then again as you stated once you grind the wheat the nutrition level drops.

  • Angel

    I have purchased the WonderMill JR Deluxe but haven’t gotten it home yet.
    I studied a long time the options and the grinder I really wants was the Country Living Grain Mill but it hovers at $500 with the attachments I wanted.

    The WonderMill seemed to be a great alternative at less than apx half the cost.

    My grains are stored in a variety of ways including SuperBuckets from Emergency Essentials to #10 cans purchased through the LDS site and in 25# bags from Bob’s Red Mill and Costco.

    I heard recently that they upped the lifetime of flour to 20 years (if I remember correctly) but then again as you stated once you grind the wheat the nutrition level drops.

  • Great idea about the coffee grinder. I live in New Zealand and couldn’t find a wheat grinder under $500.00. I didn’t even know you could grind your own wheat.

  • Great idea about the coffee grinder. I live in New Zealand and couldn’t find a wheat grinder under $500.00. I didn’t even know you could grind your own wheat.

  • NadjaUK

    We use 1 litre and 2 litre cleaned soda bottles to store dry foods like rice pasta etc, you can stack them well on cheap wine bottle storage from IKEA, they are easy to label, they’re free, they make buying bulk iteam easier to handle. A 10KG sack of rice is a pain to store, but when split into monthly ammounts in PETE bottles it’s great and much cheaper !!
    Also I use the Ward wheat grinder periodically to grind flour, it’s a really good one and I make sure I do enough to have a plentiful supply.

    I am trying to see if I can foil pack this flour at church but haven’t heard back yet – if not what is a good way to store powdered goods, flour, icing sugar etc ?? I’ve found this isn’t as good to store in soda bottles.

  • NadjaUK

    We use 1 litre and 2 litre cleaned soda bottles to store dry foods like rice pasta etc, you can stack them well on cheap wine bottle storage from IKEA, they are easy to label, they’re free, they make buying bulk iteam easier to handle. A 10KG sack of rice is a pain to store, but when split into monthly ammounts in PETE bottles it’s great and much cheaper !!
    Also I use the Ward wheat grinder periodically to grind flour, it’s a really good one and I make sure I do enough to have a plentiful supply.

    I am trying to see if I can foil pack this flour at church but haven’t heard back yet – if not what is a good way to store powdered goods, flour, icing sugar etc ?? I’ve found this isn’t as good to store in soda bottles.

  • Jennifer

    I just wanted to add that you can buy an inexpensive coffee grinder with up to 18 settings from fine to coarse instead of an expensive wheat grinder. The only down side is that you can only do small amounts at a time and then have to dump it into a larger bowl. Buying the less expensive machine got me doing something with my wheat quicker so I thought I would share.

  • Jennifer

    I just wanted to add that you can buy an inexpensive coffee grinder with up to 18 settings from fine to coarse instead of an expensive wheat grinder. The only down side is that you can only do small amounts at a time and then have to dump it into a larger bowl. Buying the less expensive machine got me doing something with my wheat quicker so I thought I would share.

  • Bill

    I’ve recently started a food storage program and have a question for anyone regarding long term wheat storage. I plan to put the wheat in FoodSaver bags with an oxygen absorber, then evacuate and seal. They will then be stored in a dark storage container in a cool basement. Will this work? I can get out a bag containing a pound or two of wheat without disturbing the other bags.

  • Bill

    I’ve recently started a food storage program and have a question for anyone regarding long term wheat storage. I plan to put the wheat in FoodSaver bags with an oxygen absorber, then evacuate and seal. They will then be stored in a dark storage container in a cool basement. Will this work? I can get out a bag containing a pound or two of wheat without disturbing the other bags.

    • Joe

      From experience I’ve had when you evacuate the bag any sharp points of the wheat may puncture a micro hole you may fail to notice. The seal may look good when you put them on the shelf, but may later let air in. This is definitely the case with banana chips. Use Mylar bags with oxygen absorber if you have access to a sealing machine.

  • Jodi

    Cathi, I’ve heard of “canning” them in jars. Or I’ve also seen people pour them into plastic containers like used juice bottles or 2 liter soda bottles. If you want uniform containers, I have found nice plastic buckets at walmart with lids that seal. I think they were about $5 and I bought a bag of wheat and moved it into that container. Hope that helps!

  • Jodi

    Cathi, I’ve heard of “canning” them in jars. Or I’ve also seen people pour them into plastic containers like used juice bottles or 2 liter soda bottles. If you want uniform containers, I have found nice plastic buckets at walmart with lids that seal. I think they were about $5 and I bought a bag of wheat and moved it into that container. Hope that helps!

  • I am a coupon shopper. So what if I find a great deal on little bags of rice/oats/etc. What are some good containers for storing our items? Leaving things in plastic bags is not an option.

    Thanks

  • I am a coupon shopper. So what if I find a great deal on little bags of rice/oats/etc. What are some good containers for storing our items? Leaving things in plastic bags is not an option.

    Thanks

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