POWERLESS COOKING

With the Seven Day Challenge “approaching” (remember it’s going to be on a surprise day – but let’s just say we’re getting close πŸ˜‰ we wanted to do a brief overview of some powerless cooking options. This is not all inclusive. There are many options available, and each have their specific advantages. We plan on going into more detail about different powerless cooking options in the future, but for now wanted to throw out a few ideas for you to think about.

SUN OVENS: Sun Ovens use the sun as an energy source and can be used to cook anything you cook in your regular oven. They can be used in parks that ban open flame cooking. There is never any danger of fire or of burning food or forests. (We can get you great DISCOUNTS if you buy it from our product page)
VOLCANO: The Volcano Collapsible Propane Grill is a very versatile and efficient Stove/Grill. The stove works with propane, wood and charcoal. Collapses down to 5″ for easy storage, and you can use multiple cooking methods such as grills, pans, dutch ovens with the Volcano.
CAMP STOVES: The number of camp stoves on the market are endless. You can get small single burner stoves, to fancy Camp Stoves that compete with stoves found in homes. When purchasing a camp stove, make sure you take storage space into consideration.
BBQ GRILLS:You may not have thought of using your BBQ in case of emergencies, however it is a legitimate way to cook without power. You may consider thinking of recipes, and dishes you can use in your BBQ you already own.
DUTCH OVEN: A Dutch oven is a thick-walled (usually cast iron) cooking pot with a tight-fitting lid. Dutch ovens have been used as cooking vessels for hundreds of years. Dutch Ovens are great for cooking a variety of meals.
GENERATORS: Generators are available in a wide range of power ratings. Depending on the type, generators may run a variety of fuel. While generators are not a cooking apparatus, they can provide power for stoves, electric pressure cookers, or crock pots. Generators must be run outside, so make sure you have plenty of extension cords.
CAMPFIRE: When all else fails, if you have wood and matches, in THEORY, you should be able to build and cook over a fire pit or in a fireplace. If this is your plan, make sure you at least have pots, pans, and utensils to cook over a fire.

Since using any of these methods requires fuel, and extreme heat, consult the user manuals for further details and safety instructions. Most of these can not be used indoors, and have limits on how much fuel you are legally allowed to store for them. Again, we’ll cover these things in more detail later.


  • Mamaboys321

    Do you offer an ideas/thoughts on ways to cook with less power? I teach home making classes and am working on a lesson for helping to keep the heat down in the summer months and ways to not heat up your kitchen into a sauna just to prepare a meal. Wondered if there was some info here that maybe I haven’t found yet. . . . -newbie

  • I enjoy “non powered” cooking. Wiether its the dutch ovens, the gas grill, the smoker or even fiol wrapped meals theyarfe fun and usefull. I really like getting the kids involved and we make a fun time of it.

  • I enjoy “non powered” cooking. Wiether its the dutch ovens, the gas grill, the smoker or even fiol wrapped meals theyarfe fun and usefull. I really like getting the kids involved and we make a fun time of it.

  • I enjoy “non powered” cooking. Wiether its the dutch ovens, the gas grill, the smoker or even fiol wrapped meals theyarfe fun and usefull. I really like getting the kids involved and we make a fun time of it.

  • evilthunder

    I was surprised that you don’t have a cardboard box oven in the list above. They are great fun to make and use and you can use your regular baking recipes in them. I made mine at a Girl Scout leader training where a volunteer came up with his own great and sturdy design. He did not have a handout with the list of materials or ordering sources or the instructions. However, I found something similar here:
    http://www.ewags.org/resources/forms/troop_camper.pdf
    There are instructions for the buddy burner, vagabond stove and a wine box oven on pages 15 and 16.

    We used heavy duty foil and aluminum tape (from a home improvement store, the ductwork department) to cover the box. We used nuts, washers and metal rods that were cut to fit to create a rack holder and just placed a cheap dollar store cooling rack on it.
    I put a window on the door to mine by cutting out a rectangle hole and taping a piece of an oven-roasting bag over it. Then I hung an oven thermometer from the rack so that I could use a flashlight to see what temperature it was inside without having to open the door.

    A disposable aluminum pie plate is used to hold the charcoal briquettes and you can estimate about 25-40 degrees per briquette (depending on the size of them) to get the temperature you need. Don’t go over 500 degrees as this is the temperature at which cardboard ignites.

    Other versions use a foil-covered paper box set over a pan of coals and some empty cans used to support the pan of food.

    Our scout troop has used the box oven for making cornbread, monkey bread, biscuits, all of kinds of things. They turn out delicious and are fun to make.

  • Blackpearlfarm

    I LOVE your new site!!!

    However, in this particular section, I would like to see the small one or two burner BUTANE or Propane stoves mentioned specifically, as there are sadly, so many people living in apartments or even vans who need a controllable, adjustable, flame cooking surface. A cooking device that has a contained (canister) fuel storage unit, that they can easily keep in their limited spaces.

    Now, let me say that I’m loving the site and have been living “The Life Style” for many decades and can’t believe I haven’t found your site long before now…

    I have a Camp Chef 2-burner, particularly for Canning (to keep the heat Outside).
    2-Coleman, dual-fuel, 2-burner, camp stoves with ovens, griddles, and even a coffee maker….
    A BBQ with an adjustable height Grill with lots of charcoal, though it only takes a few briquets to do a good job of cooking/baking —HINT: if, right after cooking, you put the coals out and allow them to completely dry (spread out, not piled up) they can be reused.
    Solar oven / Dutch ovens / Kelly Kettle — couldn’t manage without this and my Dutchies.
    I’ve just finished working on a Rocket stove to cook and Can on. Thinking limited fuel resources, as my lovely Camp Chefs use propane after all.
    Lastly I’m gathering the materials for a Methane Digester fuel source and a Still to create alcohol for gel fuels.
    Love love love you both, your site and the community you help connect.

  • Rebecca Haacke

    We have a camp chef, bbq grill, solar oven, portable Coleman stove, & dutch oven with the table to cook them on and plenty of extra fuel & charcoal. Feeling good about this possibility of the emergency

  • Momschool62626

    what about a Hibachi?

  • Momschool62626

    what about a Hibachi?

  • Don’t know if you have an Aldies in your area, but they have 3200 generators on sale for $199.00. AWESOME PRICE! They also have 6000 for $399.00. the 6000 will run the average house. A 3200 will run deep freezers and a refrigerator plus some smaller stuff. The 6000 are often in the warehouses and take about a week to get after you notify them you want one. Don’t wait until winter to do it. Be Prepared!

    • Sherryldickson

      How big are the 6000 generators? The 3200?

  • Don’t know if you have an Aldies in your area, but they have 3200 generators on sale for $199.00. AWESOME PRICE! They also have 6000 for $399.00. the 6000 will run the average house. A 3200 will run deep freezers and a refrigerator plus some smaller stuff. The 6000 are often in the warehouses and take about a week to get after you notify them you want one. Don’t wait until winter to do it. Be Prepared!

  • Love my volcano! Just got it this summer and it’s been great to cook with.Checking out the Earth Well Festival in Park City tomorrow to see the Sun Oven.@TheSurvivalMama

  • A_creature_1969

    What about cooking with Sterno Fuel or go to your local military supply store and get some of the M.R.E. cooking tabs.

  • We have a gas range too but also have a couple back-up options just in case. I’m looking into solar cooking now b/c it wouldn’t require fuel at all. What are the best things to look for in a solar oven?

  • We have a gas range too but also have a couple back-up options just in case. I’m looking into solar cooking now b/c it wouldn’t require fuel at all. What are the best things to look for in a solar oven?

  • Libby’s Library

    We have a gas grill and a charcoal grill – wow, I actually have a + on this one:-)

  • Libby’s Library

    We have a gas grill and a charcoal grill – wow, I actually have a + on this one:-)

  • I would consider it to be a viable option for cooking. My husband was a pilot in Houston during hurricane Ike and his crash pad had a gas stove and he had enough shelf stable food there to eat for two weeks. The rest of his roommates shared his food πŸ˜‰

    There may also be emergency scenarios where we cut the gas lines too … so have a backup plan!

  • Burnsfamily96

    I have a question for you in preparation for the 7 day challenge. I have a gas stove. Without power, I am still able to use the stove top as long as I have a match to light the burner and the gas lines are functioning. Can I count that as one of my alternative ways to cooking during a power outage? (Actually, in real life we lived off meals cooked on the stove for a week when our power was out due to an ice storm). I just want to know what all my options are before the challenge begins. Thanks.

    • I would consider it to be a viable option for cooking. My husband was a pilot in Houston during hurricane Ike and his crash pad had a gas stove and he had enough shelf stable food there to eat for two weeks. The rest of his roommates shared his food πŸ˜‰

      There may also be emergency scenarios where we cut the gas lines too … so have a backup plan!

  • Burnsfamily96

    I have a question for you in preparation for the 7 day challenge. I have a gas stove. Without power, I am still able to use the stove top as long as I have a match to light the burner and the gas lines are functioning. Can I count that as one of my alternative ways to cooking during a power outage? (Actually, in real life we lived off meals cooked on the stove for a week when our power was out due to an ice storm). I just want to know what all my options are before the challenge begins. Thanks.