How to Pressure Can Ground Beef

Since Julie put the “pressure” on for me to teach everyone about canning your own meat at the end of her post last week … here is a little intro to pressure canning for you!


For those of you who have followed our blog and our facebook page for a while, you may know that I tend to procrastinate on trying new things. I had my pressure cooker for almost a year before I got brave enough to try it (see why I love it so much now here, here, and here).

Well I won’t tell you how long I have had my pressure canner (*ahem* Grandma Lori bought it for me for Christmas last year *ahem*) … but I finally got brave enough to try it! Ground beef was on sale for $1.99 a pound for the LEAN kind which is pretty sweet. So I bought 20 pounds and forced myself to give it a shot.

Getting excited for my adventure!

Ok I have water-bath canned quite a few things before (you can see some of them here, here, and here) … but I was surprised that pressure canning was SOOOOOOO stinking easy! I want to cry that I have wasted a year of not being able to enjoy easy, convenient, cheap ground beef straight out of the jar.

Here is a quick picture tutorial for you, but it is so simply you can just follow the directions in your manual and you will be fine! I know it makes it easier to see someone actually do it though, so here ya go:



To get started, I cleaned all of my jars and poured hot hot water into them so that they could warm up while my ground beef was cooking. I read somewhere that this was a good thing to do, but I am not sure if it is entirely necessary. I didn’t want cracked jars though so I figured I’d do it to be safe.


I boiled five pounds of ground beef in my largest pot. I tried to break it up into small pieces while it cooked. This took about 25 minutes to cook completely. Then I drained out the greasy water. I immediately started another five pounds cooking.


While the second batch cooked, I spooned 5 pint jars full of the cooked beef. When the second batch finished I filled 5 more jars. It works out almost perfectly to be one pound of beef per pint. I LOVE that!


Once all the jars were filled with beef, I poured boiling water in them to fill just to the rim line. Then I just stuck on the sterilized lids and rings and put 10 jars in my beautiful new pressure canner. It was very exciting. I love that it can do 10 at a time! (Please excuse the monster box of Triscuits on the stove, I’m not exactly sure why they were there)


Next I followed my manual and poured in the correct amount of water and put on the lid. It was fun watching the pressure build up. I definitely had to keep adjusting my stove temperatures to keep it at the correct pressure level. I think if you had a gas stove this wouldn’t be as problematic. It only took about 5-10 minutes to get up to pressure and then I processed for 75 minutes (90 if you are doing quarts).


It took about 45 minutes before the pressure had subsided all the way and I was able to remove the lid. It is so fun to see my nice little jars all lined up to cool. I never ever use frozen ground beef in my recipes any more. This is just SO quick and easy!

This whole process definitely took a little longer than I expected mainly because of the time it took to release the pressure and cook the beef. So definitely make sure you have 3-4 hours set aside to get this done. You won’t be actively working the whole time, but don’t start it at 10 pm like I did ;)

The next thing I want to try is canned chicken. Can’t wait until it goes on sale!

p.s. Click here to read more about the pressure canner that I use. I love it!


  • Stan

    How long will this canned ground beef stay good for? Shelf life?

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      3-5 years for most home-canned goods.

  • radtec

    Just an FYI…I got myself the same canner you have last Christmas. I’m having a bit of trouble regulating it at “11 lbs” which is what all the recipes in the book call for! Anyway, as soon as the time is up, I turn off the stove, and ever so gently lift the canner straight up and move it a few inches over and set it on a hot pad on the counter. It will de-pressurize in about 15 mins. I just did 12 pints of carrots and I am sooo happy! :)

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      Great tip. Thanks!

  • BilliJo Bartle House

    You can also brown your ground meat and then can it dry. Without boiling it or pouring water on it, then your meat will not be soggy when you eat it.

  • cbnyou

    I never saw an answer as to whether or not you can use frozen burger.

  • patti

    when you do your chicken you should cut the chicken put in a pot then add chicken broth
    let cook for a little bit then add chicken to jars and pressure can…if you want you can play with the recipe by adding onions…..you can also can beef then use it later just add your bbq sauce and you have pulled beef for sandwiches..

    • BilliJo Bartle House

      If you do a raw pack put the chicken pieces in the jar to a 1 inch head space and add 1/2 tsp canning salt or bouillon for pint jars and 1 tsp for quarts.You will not need to add broth.

    • http://www.gwenspaperexpressions.com/ Gwen

      I never pre cook or cut up the chicken, I use chicken tender strips- I raw pack and never add liquid as the chicken will have its own juices- been doing this for 30+ years and never had a problem-

  • Maguen

    I see that you used a glass stove when you were canning. I have a glass stove like yours, and am wondering if you had any issues using it? I have been reading some mixed reviews on it. Thank you

    • Dolores

      I too have a glass top electric stove and was a bit concerned using my pressure canner the first time but I haven’t had any trouble. I always set it down gently on the stove and don’t move it again until it has completely cooled off (and the jars are out of it).

    • http://www.gwenspaperexpressions.com/ Gwen

      glass top is a NO NO for canning- the Sears repairman was here to fix our microwave and gave me the lecture about NEVER canning on a glass top BECAUSE your canner is larger than your burner, it will not heat properly, it will heat your entire glasstop (the canner puts the heat out onto the rest of the stovetop that is why you wont get the even heat you need, it will void the warranty on your stove when it cracks and you have to replace the entire stove because the glass top is more expensive to replace than the stove itself brand new. I use my campstove and can on my deck or in the garage depending on the weather- why would anyone want to heat up the house in the summer when you can do it outside and why would you want to risk the chance of cracking an expensive stovetop?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Matt-Miller/100001649659197 Matt Miller

    Working on a batch now! I have started doing burger pretty frequently, as my wife has gone mostly vegetarian but I still eat meat and so do the kids. A jar of ready-to-use burger is awesome for a quick spaghetti sauce or chili. With the spaghetti sauce, I can just keep some aside with no meat. Very convenient! For those following your steps, I would point out that, with pressure canning, you need to let it go for 10 minutes after it reaches a boil to make sure all the air has been purged, before you put the little weight on and start building pressure. An important step! So…have you done chicken? I like to do two drumsticks and two thighs per pint, with the bone in. It’s easy to de-bone them later and very handy for casseroles! Happy canning!

  • Cina31373

    I did up a big batch of hambugr last week and I got them up on the shelf this morning but there is not a drop of juice in the jars. The seals are all good and it looks like cooked hambugr should I worrie that there is no juice?

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      Mine didn’t have any juice in it either it’s just fine!

  • Deborah Jennings

    You can also save the fat and make soap out of it. I make soap and am going to start saving my fat so I can make some soap the old fashioned way. By recycling.

    • Abcsnana

      I have enough fat to share -just wish I could get it off my backside for u. :)

  • marthafearsme

    I have done this browning the groundbeef till barely pink then filling the jars, adding water. You have to use REALLY lean beef and browning it improves the color and flavor.

  • Paul

    Pat,

    I
    went to a local meat market that we trust and have been getting meat from for a
    long time. I purchased 20 lb. of 90/10 ground beef that is 10% fat and
    90% beef and received a small discount for the quantity ordered and picked
    up while I waited. I had them put the meat in 5 lb.
    plastic bags for easy handling when I started my canning process the next
    day. Following your suggestions things
    worked out very well. I used the beef broth to fill my jars as there was
    very little fat in the broth, and forcing out any air before putting rings and
    bands on. Then placed them in my big pressure cooker that I had heating
    up during this process. I then Closed and locked lid to stated process.
    The second time around I filled the void spaces with jars filled with
    water and processed to make sterile water for home use when needed. I usually process
    about two to three minutes over the called for time to be on the safe
    side. This is a carryover from working in a
    canner for about ten years. We came out with the
    same quantity of beef pre jar that you came out with. Boiling is basically the
    way we did it in our cannery except the amounts were greater. This was the first
    time I have tried canning hamburger at home. I found that boiling the
    meat was faster and less messy than frying for home canning. Next are chicken
    thighs and legs. Our butcher even showed us a quick and
    easy way of deboning the thighs and legs while we waited on the ground beef. Thanks,
    Paul

  • Jen P

    I recently canned ground beef for the first time with my pressure canner.  I followed the directions very closely, but my jars have a layer of fat at the top.  The jars are sealed and were processed with broth for 75 minutes (pint sized). 

    IS THE LAYER OF FAT OKAY?  When I see images of other canned beef, I rarely see this fatty top.  It wasn’t there right after the processing, just noticed it in the morning when I was putting it in my pantry. 

    Thanks for any answers, so that I know the meat is safe to eat.

    • Jen P

      Sorry, I guess I didn’t read enough previous posts, but found the answer discussed below.  Thanks

  • janine

    little tip when canning any kind of meat, use vinegar instead of water to wipe the jar rims, it cuts through any greasy residue that might be on the rims from filling and helps prevent seal failure.

    I didn’t notice wiping in general in the steps, but advised step with any and all canning.

  • Pat

    Can you actually pan fry the ground beef instead of boiling it?

  • midmoprepper

    do you know if I can can meat that has been frozen?

    • janine

      yes

  • Darcy

    FYI one does not have to pre-cook the hamburger.  

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      I liked the texture of it when I cooked it first quite a bit better. I know my manual says you can do it either way though!

  • Jessica Dalton

    Don’t waste the “greasy water”!  Chill it, so you can pull out the solidified fat and then rewarm it.  If it tastes weak, add some beef bullion cubes.  Presto!  You have beef broth.   You can pressure can this as well, or freeze it. 

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      I am going to experiment with this next time for sure!

    • Nanuk

       use the solid fat to replace oils when frying/deep frying

      beef fat can be heated much higher than vegetable fat, and therefore cooks faster

      also, due to the higher temps, LESS fat is absorbed in the food.  Ever notice take out chicken drips fat?  it never used to many years ago when cooked in beef tallow

      And it TASTES FAR BETTER!

      Jullienne Fries in Tallow are AWESOME!  (remember the McD’s fries from the early 70′s??  Yummy, and far healthier than today!

    • Minion Carlberg

      Tallow can be used in Soap, although Lard is more widely used as it doesn’t solidify at as low(relatively) a temp as Tallow.

      Tallow was widely used in the middle ages to make Candles. SO if you want to learn candle making, you can save up the tallow and learn with it before using wax. any mistakes you make are going to be a LOT cheaper than if made with Wax, also, if the tallow gets on your clothing, it is much easier to remove it(fat/grease) that it is the wax.

  • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

    Cool thanks for the tip. That looks great!

  • Beth Gordon

    Hi,

    Did you know that if you order a weight set, you won’t have to babysit the pressure? :-)   You can find one here:

    http://www.amazon.com/Presto-Pressure-Canner-Regulator/dp/B000HMBVQ8

    If you remove one ring and put the regulator on, the pressure canner will stay right at 10 pounds and you can go off and do something else while it processes.

  • Kmusickelli

    how long is wet packed meat good for?

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      I go through mine in about a year, but I have heard it will be good for 2-3 years.

  • Kanderson8039@aol.com

    Im looking for the presto pressure receipt for baked beans

  • angie

    I am excited to can mixes from my make-a-mix book like all-purpose ground meat mix, mexican meat mix and chicken mix.  I have already incorporated these into my “freezer based 3-month supply” but now can think more long term. 

  • Vonnie

    how long is cooked meat the shelf life? I have never done this before
     

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      I have heard between one and three years. I plan to try to keep a years worth on hand plus another years worth that I am eating and rotating. Then about once a year I will replenish a year’s worth. Does that make sense?

      • Minion Carlberg

        While i understand the concept of canning and having a bit set back, I would like to make a suggestion.

        instead of keeping a year of food canned and held back, and then rotate through another year of canned food, why not can, for example, an 18 month supply that you replenish every 6 months. that way you are keeping the freshest at the back and still have a year of canned food ready at all times?

  • Wiserangel

    We use a lot of bulk sausage for our spaghetti sauce instead of ground beef. I was wondering if you could follow the canning of ground beef but use sausage instead. Do you know if this is possible. Thanks in advance.
    June

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Yes I believe it would work just the same!

  • Carol

    Okay so I am new to this and yesterday just canned my first batch of ground beef. I fried the ground beef instead of boiling it and added 1/4 tsp of powdered beef broth before adding the hot water to the jars. Everything went pretty good but this morning after the jars had set up there is a grease layer which has formed at the top of the jars. Will this cause my meat to become rancid? How long of a shelf life can I expect for ground beef? I also read that you need to boil any home canned meat for 10 minutes before eating it, is this something I should do with all the meat I can?

  • Carol

    Okay so I am new to this and yesterday just canned my first batch of ground beef. I fried the ground beef instead of boiling it and added 1/4 tsp of powdered beef broth before adding the hot water to the jars. Everything went pretty good but this morning after the jars had set up there is a grease layer which has formed at the top of the jars. Will this cause my meat to become rancid? How long of a shelf life can I expect for ground beef? I also read that you need to boil any home canned meat for 10 minutes before eating it, is this something I should do with all the meat I can?

  • Carol

    Okay so I am new to this and yesterday just canned my first batch of ground beef. I fried the ground beef instead of boiling it and added 1/4 tsp of powdered beef broth before adding the hot water to the jars. Everything went pretty good but this morning after the jars had set up there is a grease layer which has formed at the top of the jars. Will this cause my meat to become rancid? How long of a shelf life can I expect for ground beef? I also read that you need to boil any home canned meat for 10 minutes before eating it, is this something I should do with all the meat I can?

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Mine had the layer of grease on the top too. I just scrape it off when I
      pull the beef out of the can. I think it’s impossible to get ALL of the fat
      out before you can it. It should have no affect on it going rancid. The
      beef should be fully cooked from all of the time spent cooking before plus
      the processing time. You only need to reheat it when you eat it. Glad you
      enjoyed it! I LOVE my home canned meats now.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Mine had the layer of grease on the top too. I just scrape it off when I
      pull the beef out of the can. I think it’s impossible to get ALL of the fat
      out before you can it. It should have no affect on it going rancid. The
      beef should be fully cooked from all of the time spent cooking before plus
      the processing time. You only need to reheat it when you eat it. Glad you
      enjoyed it! I LOVE my home canned meats now.

    • http://doomerincanada.blogspot.com/ Canadian Doomer

      I don’t skim off the fat when I can meat and sometimes I get a huge layer of fat, especially with pork. It hasn’t caused me any problems at all. The standard recommendation is that home-canned meat is safe for a year, but lots of canners (and I think the lid manufacturers) say it’s safe as long as the seals hold. I also don’t boil my meat – sometimes I drain the broth and make sandwiches, in fact. Home-canned pork makes great sandwich meat. The reason for boiling all canned food (not just meat) is just in case there’s botulism in your jars.

    • http://doomerincanada.blogspot.com/ Canadian Doomer

      I don’t skim off the fat when I can meat and sometimes I get a huge layer of fat, especially with pork. It hasn’t caused me any problems at all. The standard recommendation is that home-canned meat is safe for a year, but lots of canners (and I think the lid manufacturers) say it’s safe as long as the seals hold. I also don’t boil my meat – sometimes I drain the broth and make sandwiches, in fact. Home-canned pork makes great sandwich meat. The reason for boiling all canned food (not just meat) is just in case there’s botulism in your jars.

  • Carol

    Okay so I am new to this and yesterday just canned my first batch of ground beef. I fried the ground beef instead of boiling it and added 1/4 tsp of powdered beef broth before adding the hot water to the jars. Everything went pretty good but this morning after the jars had set up there is a grease layer which has formed at the top of the jars. Will this cause my meat to become rancid? How long of a shelf life can I expect for ground beef? I also read that you need to boil any home canned meat for 10 minutes before eating it, is this something I should do with all the meat I can?

  • Terradonno

    Thank you all for the information provided!
    We took the plunge, purchased a 23 Q Cooker and canned 12 lbs of burger! One jar bubbled for quite a while after the process was over and the jars were cooling. Does that signify a “poor seal”?

    Regards,

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      If you remove the ring and the lid is sucked down and securely on, that means it sealed properly. I’m guessing that that jar might have been heated more than the others like maybe if it was in the middle of the canner or something. I don’t think it sounds like a problem but I am still fairly new to this myself!

      • Terradonno

        Jodi,

        The lids are sucked down tight!

        Thank You

  • Pattibell16

    Lori, When I am canning, after my jars are washed,clean etc., I put them in the shelves of my oven which I then turn on to the lowest setting. When I am ready to put the ingredients in the jar, I take out 2 at a time so one is always there to be filled up. This has worked wonderfully for me. They remain sterile and they are out of the way leaving you a bit more working space. The jars are HOT so you must use the jar lifter to remove them. Patti

    • Minion Carlberg

      Another trick is to use the dish washer, if you have one, to sterilize the jars. put the jars on bottom and the rings on top, set to heated dry. use soap if you like, but not needed if they are already clean.

      the hot water will kill any bacteria and the heated dry will make sure they are hot and sterile when you need them, if you time the cycle with your canning.

  • Eilene Wright

    shoot …2 years shelf life.

  • Eilene Wright

    shoot i forgot to add I use a fat seperator, you dont want that in your jars yuck.

  • Gtfo-now

    I use a huge stock pot and I do “boil” my ground beef…you need just enough water to cover the beef, and I use garlic onion and celery here. after it is cooked I drain the beef into a lg bowl and let it cool somewhat, I fill my jars with beef (use the jar filler it keeps any fat off your rims). I put my stock into a lg pan and boullion if needed for more broth. Use this to fill your jars 1″ from the top. Ground beef is the only meat that I don’t RAW PACK. it is great! I promise. btw when you can chicken you do not need to add water chicken makes its own broth inside the jar, YUM

  • Margail

    Hi there, I was just wondering what the shelf life is for the hamburger when you can it yourself…thanks!

  • Susan

    I am concerned that the ground beef would be watery. Wouldn’t it be better to brown it in a pan on the stove instead of boiling it? And what about adding beef broth to the jars instead of water?

  • kksprague

    It appears that you use a glass top stove when pressure canning. I read that the high heat used in canning can cause the glass to break. Should I be concerned? Your website is great – Thanks!

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      My manual only said not to use it on an outdoor propane grill. I used
      it on my glasstop stove just fine. I do have an older stove so I am
      willing to take the risk should anything occur. I’m wondering if maybe
      older pressure canners used to be problematic on glass top stoves.
      Because lots of people think it is a worry but I haven’t seen an
      official statement on it.

      • andi

         My understanding of the problem with pressure canners on glass top stoves was the safety of the food.  Glass tops have more of a temperature swing which makes it hard to maintain a constant temp. and pressure.

        • Lana Celmer

          If you are in the market for an electric glasstop stove, look for one with an extra large, CANNING burner.  The glasstop electric  burners designed for canning have a more steady heat, and they don’t cycle on & off all the time like the littler standard electric burners. 

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      My manual only said not to use it on an outdoor propane grill. I used
      it on my glasstop stove just fine. I do have an older stove so I am
      willing to take the risk should anything occur. I’m wondering if maybe
      older pressure canners used to be problematic on glass top stoves.
      Because lots of people think it is a worry but I haven’t seen an
      official statement on it.

  • Nd_junk

    Can you pressure can in the pressure cooker that I just bought (the cuisinart)? I understand it will not do as much, but will it work? Thanks and I love your site!

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      If it is an electric pressure cooker, you can’t “CAN” in it. If it is a stove-top cooker, your manual should tell you whether or not it is approved for canning. Hope that helps!

  • Noni4you

    I would like to know how long the meat will keep. …Marlene

  • John1918

    I’ve never done any of this so I can’t speak from experience. However, boiling hamburg and storing it in water just sounds so ‘un appetizing’ to me. When you use a jar of canned hamburg, I assume you just strain the water or stock out of it, and fry it…adding oninon and other seasonings at that point. Does it really pass the taste test??

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      So far I have used it in spaghetti sauce, hamburger helper, and added
      it to rice-a-roni. It tastes just like fried hamburger to me! I put
      in a few dehydrated onions in with it when I boiled it just to give it
      some flavor. When I use it out of the jar there is no water left in
      it. I just scooped it out with a spoon straight into whatever I’m
      making. It’s good I promise!

    • Cashyourway

      I have been boiling my hamburger for years to make homemade chili. WOW, family loves it. It is sooooooo much more healthy for you that way. When making the Chili, I put the hamburger, kidney beans, canned tomatoes, onions, bell peppers in, chili powder, salt pepper, Browning Sauce (adds flavor and a rich color) (comes in a small glass jar in the grocery store so ask for it. I use it in beef stew too). Then I add a couple of teaspoons of brown sugar. Absolutely delicious and the calorie count is waaaaaay less that way.

      • Carla

        do you drain the water after boiling?

    • Azrcka

      When I CAN my hamburger I do not boil it, however I will try it on at least one batch..I cook my grounded beef with diced onions and celery, as I would for any basic dish. I drain drain and drain the grease (there is still some fat that will come to the top of your jar, but not that much. I pack my jars fairly tight. I add 1/2 a teaspoon of sea salt to each pint that I fill with water. I have experimented with adding beef broth instead of water that works great too, I do not add additional salt if I use the broth. When all is said and done it is great to know you have all this great meat on your selves no freezer needed….CANNING Chicken is the easiest ever ..you just take your frozen skinless boneless chicken breast (get a nice pair of kitchen scissors) cut the chicken into chunks (you can fit appox. 4 breast to a pint depending on the size) I add my 1/2 tsp. salt and water to the jar. That’s it!!! Then pressure cook as directed. The reason I use frozen is that is how I get it from the chicken plant here in GA. I bring it home put it in my freezer and CAN when I’m ready.

    • Dolores

      I don’t add any liquid to my ground beef when I can it and it comes out perfect, not at all mushy.

  • Suki

    Man, oh, man. I really do love this blog! I learn so much and even if I don’t have the money to buy a pressure canner right now, you know where I’ll be when I do! We have a small freezer and so being able to can things like meat (genius!) will be so nice.

    • Cobbsmom

      My first year of pressure canning I did over 700 jars of meats and vegetables. I bought every jar I used but even including the cost of the jars I still saved over $106 a month the first year. The second year, I still bought more jars but now as many and I saved an average of $146 a month in groceries.

      Most of my food was bought from local farmer markets. The pressure canner will pay for itself in only a few months of savings. You won’t regret the investment once you take the step.

  • Npp1966

    You may need to adjust times depending on elevation depending on where some of you live. Your time for your pressure to release did seem a little long but I would use caution on opening the valve too wide because you could release the pressure too fast and it may cause jars to break. Most home canned items have a shelf life of anywhere to 3 – 5 years but, this is the “safe” estimate that they give you to go by. My mom canned for years and we were eating things she had canned in the 70′s well into the 80′s with no adverse taste that I could ever see. Periodically check your seals to make sure they are still intake. Make sure no jar seals are “weeping” and keep stored in cool dry area out of direct sunlight. If you open a jar that you feel is in questionable condition then smell for an “off” odor, when heated if there is an “off” odor then it’s probably best to disscard. Just this fall I started back canning. I had never done meat and had only seen my Mom do sausage patties. I have cooked gr. beef, beef tips, bbq pork, chicken, a sausage italiano dish, italian wedding soup, split pea soup. I can’t wait to try bacon, turkey sausage patties, shrimp, and I’d like to do a big batch of chicken. Love the idea that with dehydrated items and canned items I can help tone down the items stored in my freezer if we do not have electricity.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      My manual had instructions for higher altitude which I followed for Utah. The processing time was the same but I processed at 12 instead of 11. I don’t know if it affects the time it takes to release pressure.

      Thanks for the great tips!

    • Cobbsmom

      I canned sausage patties that had sage in them – they were awful – the sage overpowered the flavor of the sausage. So if you make your sausage fresh or use a commercial grade, make sure it doesn’t have sage.

      I have canned pure beef hot dogs (a national brand) with water – they taste like vienna sausages (with no fillers). I have canned ham and do not like it except for making a ham spread. To me it has a strong taste.

      Try canning pork loin with half vinegar and half water. Make sure the pork is fully covered – it makes the best BBQ North Carolina style. I am hesitant to process seafood of any type because the processing time is 100 minutes no matter how it is prepared.

      I love canned chicken and turkey for quick meals.

  • Npp1966

    You may need to adjust times depending on elevation depending on where some of you live. Your time for your pressure to release did seem a little long but I would use caution on opening the valve too wide because you could release the pressure too fast and it may cause jars to break. Most home canned items have a shelf life of anywhere to 3 – 5 years but, this is the “safe” estimate that they give you to go by. My mom canned for years and we were eating things she had canned in the 70′s well into the 80′s with no adverse taste that I could ever see. Periodically check your seals to make sure they are still intake. Make sure no jar seals are “weeping” and keep stored in cool dry area out of direct sunlight. If you open a jar that you feel is in questionable condition then smell for an “off” odor, when heated if there is an “off” odor then it’s probably best to disscard. Just this fall I started back canning. I had never done meat and had only seen my Mom do sausage patties. I have cooked gr. beef, beef tips, bbq pork, chicken, a sausage italiano dish, italian wedding soup, split pea soup. I can’t wait to try bacon, turkey sausage patties, shrimp, and I’d like to do a big batch of chicken. Love the idea that with dehydrated items and canned items I can help tone down the items stored in my freezer if we do not have electricity.

  • Gloud07

    It shouldn’t take that long to release the pressure in your canner. You just open up the valve thing wide open and it will take 5 to ten minutes to release all of the pressure.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      My manual says to only let it release naturally and not to open the valve or the jars might break. The time to release the pressure also includes a ten minute wait period that my manual says to do after the pressure is all the way released. Maybe other pressure canners work differently?

      • Brchbell

        That is correct! If you really can’t wait set it in the sink and pour some water over it but frankly after sitting there for 75 to 90 minutes, I’m ready to get up and move a little! I come back half an hour later and it’s more than ready to open up!

        • Umstetter

          Again, it will also cause the JARS to vent as well as the canner to vent. The reason for letting it come down by itself is to gently release the pressure, so the jar contents doesn’t spill out or cause the seal to fail.

    • Umstetter

      Not only can you break your jars doing this, your more likely to venting either the food itself or the liquid IN the food, into the canner, causing the seal(s) to fail. Same results if the pressure is not kept at a fairly constant pressure. (If it does wild swings in pressure, not a pound or two either way.)

    • Eilene Wright

      no no no…the point of the pressure in the canner, is it boils your stuff “hotter” than boiling…its takes awhile to get it up to that point, it needs to depressurize by coming to temperature as it will…it isnt like a waterbath…slow is better.

  • Henry_Bowman

    What is the shelf life for this beef ?

    • Cobbsmom

      I have beef that dates back 4 years when I first started canning.. You should rotate your home canned foods the same as your commercially canned foods – within one year is ideal. I don’t taste any difference in the older canned meats than I do in the newly canned ones.

  • Cobbsmom

    I recommend that the rings be removed and the jars washed with hot soapy water using a soft nail brush to get around the threads and under the lip of the lid.

    You did great – same process for any meat. The more lean meats you can raw pack, but ground meats are best pre-cooked. Now you have the makings for sloppy joes, skillet dishes, tacos, and much more – all within a few minutes.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Yes the jars seemed like they had a bit of a film when I pulled them out. I did wash them before storing. Great idea to take off the rings too!

      • Eilene Wright

        add a wee bit of vinegar into your canning water, it keeps the filmy goo off your jars from hard water.

        • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

          awesome tip!

          • Patricia

            is the vinegar supposed to go in the water that goes into the jar, or the water that surrounds the jar in the pressure cooker?

          • Selfreliantsis1

            The vinegar goes into the water that surrounds the jar in the pressure cooker…don’t put vinegar in your jars!

          • Patricia

            is the vinegar supposed to go in the water that goes into the jar, or the water that surrounds the jar in the pressure cooker?

      • Sand

        Take the rings off and store the jars without the rings? I’m very new to this canning bizz, but I don’t remember my grandma’s root cellar having cans with no lids. Take the rings off, clean and but them back on? Or leave them off? Thanks so much — as I said – I’m new to this. 

        • Dolores

          The rings/bands do not have to go back on the jars when you store the jars of canned food.

  • Vmfisher

    Another minor thing to add. . . you didn’t mention venting the canner. That should be done for 10 min. before you start to build pressure. I love my canned ground beef and other meats.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Yes my manual said to do this. I didn’t have my manual upstairs with me when I was writing the post and forgot to mention that! I advised people to follow their own manuals for the directions specific to their units.

    • Cobbsmom

      My Presto manual states to vent for 10 minutes, but it takes 15 minutes for the pressure to build enough to make the petcock close before placing my weight. I use this time as the venting time.

  • midwesterner

    A few minor things to add. First, pints of meat should go for 75 minutes rather than 90. (90 minutes is for quarts.) Second, you can use boiling beef stock/broth instead of water to fill if you want a little beefier taste. And third, you can fry up the beef instead of boiling it, maybe adding a little onion for flavor. When you rinse it in a collander, you’ll lose some of the flavor though, so using beef stock or broth helps put some back.

    You can use any kind of ground meat instead of beef, of course. Same process, just different starting point.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

      Oops, when I wrote down my times it was for the batch I did the next
      night, which WAS in quarts. Thanks for catching that! I put in some
      onion flakes in the water as it boiled and that helped add some
      flavor. I didn’t have enough beef broth on hand so I went with water
      and that worked fine too. I chose to boil it as it is less messy and
      time consuming than frying. It worked well for me, but I know people
      who prefer to fry it too. Thanks for the tips! It’s fun to see how
      different people do things.

      • Brchbell

        I pour the liquid of into a another pan after I boil mine. I stick the broth into the freezer while the ground beef cools and then I pack 1 lb into each pint jar. You can add salt but don’t add more then 1/4 tsp to a pint jar. I did this once half asleep and added more and it was way to salty, could eat it! Anyway I take the stock out of the freezer and pull the fat off the top and then reheat or just use it cold instead of using plain water. I don’t add anything t mine so I can use it in anything I want. I can always add onion later but can’t remove it once it’s in.

        • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi – Food Storage Made Easy

          I tried using some of the broth after I boiled it and it seemed so fatty. If I had more time to wait I would definitely do the freezer thing to skim off the fat. As it was already about 11 pm at that point I opted for boiling water. hehe.

          • Brchbell

            I always pour the broth off into another clean container and run it to the freezer. By the time I fill my jars and run back for the broth the fat has come to the top and turned white so easily removed!

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1402113627 Christine Klein

      I usually will just stick a cube of beef broth in my jar before putting the water in. This is cheap and easy ;) And yes… only 75 min for pints (1 lb meat) and 90 min for quarts (2 lbs)