Let’s Talk About Sprouted Bread

Today we’re talking about spending some time in a friends kitchen, sprouted bread, and being healthy.

You can learn more about sprouting Basics on our Sprouting Page. Sprouting is definitely NOT the place to start when you are building a Food Storage, however as you learn more and more about Food Storage – you’ll understand it’s importance. I’m almost 3 years into my Food Storage journey – and I’ll say I probably spend a WEEEE bit more time on Food Storage than the average person so don’t worry if you’re reading this post thinking WHAT IN THE WORLD IS JULIE TALKING ABOUT?


So last week a good friend of mine, called me up and said one of our neighbors was going to be teaching her how to make sprouted wheat bread, and if she knew anyone that wanted to come along to invite them. I hurried and told my husband he needed to drop everything and watch the kids (he works from home some days). I have been wanting to learn about this for so long but have been WAY too scared. Something about being in a friends kitchen learning about it made it so much less intimidating. So if you’re asking yourself what is sprouted wheat bread I’ll tell you –


Sprouted wheat bread, is whole wheat bread made with flour ground from wheat berries that have been sprouted. After sprouting the berries by having them sit in water for a number of hours, the sprouted berries are then completely dehydrated and put through a grain mill to create flour. Here’s a picture I found online- my loaf didn’t last long enough for a photo shoot:

In another post, I’ll tell you all about the process and how it works. I need to work up the energy to MAKE it, and to film the whole process so you too can feel like your in your friends kitchen learning how to do it.


The reason for the post today is to research the benefits of sprouting, and sprouted bread specifically. After tasting the delicious bread I wanted to commit to making sprouted wheat bread, however I’m not going to lie – IT IS A PROCESS. So I wanted to figure out how much better it is for you – so I could encourage myself to do it more often.

The following information is found at ehow.com. I read a lot of information on different websites before I found this concise synopsis. The information found in this article seems to be consistent with other stuff I read.

Benefits of Sprouted Wheat Bread

Sprouted wheat bread is nutrient dense, easier to digest and has more dietary fiber than processed wheat bread. Sprouting wheat berries encourages them to make enzymes that break down starches, fats and proteins, which makes it easier to digest the grain. Sprouting tends to break down many of the substances, such as gluten, that may cause allergies in some people.

Nutrient Dense

Sprouted wheat, as well as other sprouted grains, have a significantly higher level of vitamins, proteins and enzymes. The complex starches in sprouted wheat bread are converted into natural sugars. Sprouted wheat is high in magnesium, manganese and selenium. It is low in cholesterol, fat and sodium.

Low Glycemic Index

Because sprouted wheat bread has a low glycemic index (GI) it is digested at a slower rate, enabling a person’s blood sugar level to be stable for a longer time, which helps them to be more satisfied, decreasing a desire to snack.

Health Benefits

Sprouted wheat bread has more dietary fiber than processed grain breads. This may improve bowel health and regularity. It may also help to lower cholesterol and blood pressure, assist in weight control and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Sprouting assists in making nutrients more available and can increase the absorption of calcium, iron and other minerals.

Stay tuned – I’ll be showing you the whole process of making the bread “soon”.


  • Amy

    I searched for the recipe on your site but can’t find it. Have you posted the recipe for the sprouted wheat bread?

    • Amy,
      I LOST the recipe page before I could post it. Embarrassing I know. I will try and track down the friend who showed it to me. She moved and I have lost touch with her.

  • Alisha

    1 question – 1 point – 
    Q- define dehydrate.  As in – put it in a dehydrator?  Or just let it sit out on a plate til its shriveled?  

    Point – Adding 2 TBS dehydrated sprouted wheat will replace the sugar in your recipe.  I’ve tasted bread with no sugar/honey/etc and it was sweet.  The man that showed me said it was from the sprouted wheat that was added.  I was AMAZED!  

    I haven’t tried it in breakfast breads or cookies.  Has anyone else?  I’d like to know if I can use my wheat (sprouted) to replace my sugar.  That would be awesome!

  • Alisha

    1 question – 1 point – 
    Q- define dehydrate.  As in – put it in a dehydrator?  Or just let it sit out on a plate til its shriveled?  

    Point – Adding 2 TBS dehydrated sprouted wheat will replace the sugar in your recipe.  I’ve tasted bread with no sugar/honey/etc and it was sweet.  The man that showed me said it was from the sprouted wheat that was added.  I was AMAZED!  

    I haven’t tried it in breakfast breads or cookies.  Has anyone else?  I’d like to know if I can use my wheat (sprouted) to replace my sugar.  That would be awesome!

  • Sarah Lee

    Will you be posting more? I’m very interested in learning how to make this bread, but it’s been awhile since you’ve posted this… 🙂

    • Linda

      I have a video I made which is on you tube. My channel is bearknudsen. We love this bread! It isn’t like baking traditional bread and takes some getting used to. I had to go through several batches. The bread is soft. No hard kernels.

  • Suki L

    I’m way way way way WAY excited to learn more about sprouted bread. I’ve talked with my parents about eliminating wheat from diets (we were specifically talking about the blood type diets by Peter D’Adamo) and my biggest concern was bread (because, let’s face it, all ezekial bread I’ve tasted does not taste good AT ALL). I’ve heard of sprouted bread and how it is much better but I haven’t taken the first step to learn more. Thanks for doing the hard work for me! 😀

  • April

    I saw a post, but I can’t find the link right now, that showed how to make sprouted wheat bread without dehydrating it again. You put the moist sprouts in a food processor and make the whole dough batch in there. I’ll keep trying to find the post.

  • sclindah

    I’m anxious for you to give us more information about the sprouted bread! I really want to make bread this way as I’m diabetic. I’ve tried sprouted the wheat and dried it into flower okay but am doing something wrong. The dough is beautiful but for some reason it falls after cooking. I look forward to your future post!

  • Rebecca

    I am excited for the video. I feel a need to learn how to make it. I have Crohn’s Disease and need to watch the way I combine my foods. So, I don’t eat proteins with starches, as it makes my stomach hurt. But, sprouted bread is ok to eat with protiens. So, if I want a ham and cheese sandwich, I can eat it with sprouted bread and be fine. Thank you very much for your willingness to teach us.

  • Pilarandmike

    I have been thinking about this, can’t wait for the next installment.

  • Grandma Lori

    I’m thinking this is different than what I thought it was. I’ve sprouted a couple of handfuls of wheat berries, then thrown the sprouted kernels directly into bread dough made with my normal recipe. They are good and chewy, but it’s just a few kernels.

  • Suzanne

    Is the comparison similar for regular home-ground wheat breads as the processed breads it talks about?

  • Suzanne

    Is the comparison similar for regular home-ground wheat breads as the processed breads it talks about?

  • Patti (hardworkfhe)

    I am wondering if it changes the protein value? I have been looking at this. I am thinking add this into my roll recipe. But I’m not sure about replacing all of my whole wheat with all sprouted wheat flour. I haven’t seen anything about if you lose protein in the sprouting process.

    • Linda Traciskitchen

      Sprouting wheat, from what I have learned, turns the wheat into a complete protein wit all 10 essential amino acids. Hope that helps. I make soft sprouted wheat bread every week. We love it!

      • Linda

        Sorry, I am not a scientist. … 9 essential amino acids… At any rate u have been told that sprouting makes the grain a complete protein.

  • Patti (hardworkfhe)

    I am wondering if it changes the protein value? I have been looking at this. I am thinking add this into my roll recipe. But I’m not sure about replacing all of my whole wheat with all sprouted wheat flour. I haven’t seen anything about if you lose protein in the sprouting process.

  • mirien

    Thanks! I’ve been wanting to attempt this for months, but still haven’t gotten brave enough to try it. I am anxiously awaiting your video…