Disasters Kit

The following items are what make up your 72 Hour Kits and Emergency Binder in our Emergency Preparedness Plan.

This section includes a list of items for 72 hour kits. We’ve also included a list of important documents for you to gather to create your Emergency Binder in case you you have to “rebuild” your life. These items may be for you to use at home, or for you to take with you in case of an evacuation type scenario.

72 Hour Kits

We have found that most sources suggest storing similar supplies to have on hand in the event of an emergency.  The following is a list of the most common items we found:

✓ Supply of water
✓ Food (see next page)
✓ First aid kit
✓ Prescription medications
✓ Extra pair of glasses
✓ Contact solution
✓ Credit cards and cash
✓ Change of clothes
✓ Sturdy shoes
✓ Battery powered radio
✓ Extra batteries
✓ Blankets or sleeping bags
✓ Rain poncho
✓ Body warmer
✓ Glow stick
✓ Tarp or a tent
✓ List of contact info
✓ Booster cables for car
✓ Car shovel
✓ Ropes
✓ Swiss army knife
✓ N95 dust mask
✓ Work gloves
✓ Flashlights
✓ Wind/waterproof matches
✓ Candles and candle
✓ Trash bags
✓ Personal hygiene products
✓ Baby supplies
✓ Games and books
✓ Pet supplies
✓ Sanitation supplies
✓ Tire repair kit and pump
✓ Maps of surrounding areas
✓ Sewing kit
✓ Blank CD for SOS
✓ Whistle
✓ Multipurpose tool
✓ PowerCap

72 Hour Kit Food Options

When preparing for an emergency, it is recommended that you put together a kit of food to last you 72 hours. You can follow detailed instructions and build your own, put together a custom one from ideas, or buy pre-made ones. We recommend doing whichever option fits your style:

Detailed Instructions: If you want it laid out for you step by step including a shopping list and contents list for one particular example of a 72 Hour Kit, follow our 72 Hour Kit milk jug instructions.

Create Your Own: If you want to have more flexibility over your meal options, you can customize your kit. For suggestions on types of foods to include depending on your personal situation, click here.

Already Made: To purchase pre-made kits, visit emergency preparedness stores, or online sites. The pre-made kits can be helpful, and a great way to go if you are feeling overwhelmed with gathering all the items yourself.

Emergency Essentials
eeEverything from a basic one person kit to a deluxe kit for the whole family.

Emergency Binder

An Emergency Binder is a compilation of important documents.   In the event of an emergency, you could grab your binder and go with all your documents.  We recommend storing your binder in a fireproof/ waterproof locked box that is small enough to be transported with you in an emergency.

VITAL DOCUMENTS
✓ Birth certificates
✓ Passports
✓ Immunization records
✓ CASH – keep small bills
✓ Copy of your will
✓ Medical information
✓ Military and church papers
✓ Diplomas and transcripts
✓ Marriage certificates
✓ Adoption papers
✓ Current pictures of family
✓ Pet records
✓ Proof of citizenship
   INSURANCE INFO
✓ Homeowners insurance policy
✓ Auto insurance policy
✓ Life insurance policy
✓ Medical insurance policy
✓ Pictures and lists of all your personal belongings
✓ Contact information for insurance agents
   FINANCIAL INFO
✓ Copies of your credit
✓ Bank statements
✓ Retirement statements
✓ Social security statements
✓ Internet passwords
✓ Utility statements
✓ Work/tax documents that would be difficult to replace
✓ Deeds to properties
✓ Titles to cars, boats etc
✓ Warranty information

For complete instructions on making an Emergency Binder visit this post


FINDMORE

 

  • Janie

    A guy that is in the ARMY told my Prepardness Group to have a box of Tampons on hand for Gun shot wounds. they place the Tampon in the hole of the gunshoot wound to STOP the bleeding when they are in War.

  • Linda

    I am brand new to your site.  My husband, our adult children, and several of our friends are all starting food storage because we are concerned about the state of our country, and, also, who knows when an emergency could happen.  I stumbled onto your site about a week, or so, ago, and so thankful to both of you for taking the time to show us how to put together emergency supply kits, and start our food storage.  I’m heading into town tomorrow to start picking up supplies.  

    God Bless you both. 

  • 123

    i would not use a battery radio. i would get the hand wheel one.

    • Homeinsteader

       Hand-wheels break – quite easily, I’m afraid, since most of these are being made in China. A Katadyn radio (for example) with multiple power sources: solar panel built-in (flips from top); battery; crank; AC/DC plug-in…about $50 right now from EE; $70 at other sites.

  • Wendy

    Cathy, my husband thought I was crazy when I did our emergency kits years ago.  We didn’t need the kits that year, but two years later when we had to evacuate we put our bags in the mini van and didn’t have to think about what we might not have packed. 

  • Victoria

    I am assuming a 72 hr disaster preparedness kit for one person must be lightweight in case one has to carry it.  It requires 3 gal water: water weighs 8 lb per gallon, totalling 24 lbs/kit. This is before all the other items in the kit. What options are there to hauling the water for those who are not allowed to lift this much, such as persons with back injuries or heart issues?  How are other people handling the weight issue? 

  • Annie2870

    Kodak has a scanner that allows you to scan up to 200 pictures to a CD for 9.99 you can scan super fast and then transfer to a flash drive or smart card just in case…scanning important documents can be a good backup too..lock n your lock box and you have piece of mind

  • Cathy

    Am new to these ideas, but have been working my way through them as quickly as I can.  I put together some 72 hour kits this weekend….  My husband and one of my sons thinks that I am nuts..  I told them they can think so but I believe it is necessary, so I continue.

    Has anyone else had people in their family ridiculing them for taking these steps?  I am not LDS, and I know that for the LDS they are required to do at least some food storage.

    Thanks for the site and the great posts…  I have learned a lot and check back here on almost a daily basis…  Thanks for giving steps to begin what seemed an overwhelming task.  Thanks also for bringing up ideas I might not have thought about immediately.  I feel like you all have done the trial and error steps that I did not have the time to do myself.

    Blessings…

    • There are lot of our readers who are not LDS who are very interested in preparedness and food storage. You can connect with them on our facebook page at http://facebook.com/foodstoragemadeeasy

      • Cathy

        Yes, Jodi, I agree with that.  There has been a significant increase in interest in preppie, etc.

        I am very thankful for the site and the posts that I have read, very informative.

    • There are lot of our readers who are not LDS who are very interested in preparedness and food storage. You can connect with them on our facebook page at http://facebook.com/foodstoragemadeeasy

    • Victoria

      Cathy, you are doing what is right for your family by preparing yourself for contingencies.  Just remember that people ridiculed Noah for building the ark!  I am sure many Egyptians also ridiculed Joseph for storing the 7 fat years of grain, but were very happy for his wisdom when the 7 lean years hit!  If you are Christian, you are following proper Christian husbandry principles (described as the Virtuous Woman in the Bible).  Other belief systems also follow these principles.

      I learned to have food storage and emergency supplies on hand from my grandmother, mainly as backup due to unemployment (her husband was a miner, and strikes were common in her day) and natural disasters such as storms and floods. My husband sometimes rolls his eyes at me, thinking “How are we going to use all this food?”  or  suggesting that I am paranoid because I want to expand into long-term storage of grains and freeze dried foods now that I have 6 months supply of food on hand.  However, there are ways to get them to see the light.  Just discuss the news.  Nearly every day there is a disaster: Katrina, tsunami in Japan, floods or power outages from storms in the local area, etc.  There is also the current unemployment rate.  Just discussing in positive terms these issues gets them thinking.  For example, if a story about a storm hitting the power grid came on TV, you might say “Aren’t we lucky that we have a 72 hour emergency kit already set up?  If our power goes out for three days, we don’t have to worry about it – we just open our emergency kits! (smile).”  Or you can use some of your food storage and show the kids how to make their own mixes (“Gifts in a Jar” is a good book for this), and say “A cookie mix at the store costs $X, but we made ours for only $Y.  That saved us $ that we can use for something else, like clothes or a toy.”  You can even make it a game.  Show them coupons and have them total up how much you saved per can using a double coupon.  All you have to do is get them thinking!  They come around quicker than you think.

  • Amy

    This is an awesome site and I am excited to start the checklist and prepare my kits. One thing came to mind as I was reviewing the meal plan is. What do you use for cleaning the Beanie/Weines can for the next use (i.e. cocoa). I may be missing something. Just want to make sure I have what I need when I need it 🙂

  • Amy

    This is an awesome site and I am excited to start the checklist and prepare my kits. One thing came to mind as I was reviewing the meal plan is. What do you use for cleaning the Beanie/Weines can for the next use (i.e. cocoa). I may be missing something. Just want to make sure I have what I need when I need it 🙂

    • I used babywipes to clean mine out and then rinsed with a little bit of
      water. The kit plans for a little bit of extra water for cleaning and such.

    • Kristian

      Reminds me of a quick cleanup method we used in the Army.  A plastic canteen could get a little nasty after a while if not cleaned regularly or stored empty.  When we needed to clean a canteen, we would fill it 1/4 full of water and add some clean sand and shake it really good.  Then we’d rinse out the sand with clean water.  Salt also worked.  Be careful not to waste water if you are conserving it. 

      In a pinch, you can use this method to clean just about anything.  Be sure to dry thoroughly and in direct sunlight. 

  • Kim

    A friend of a fireman told my mother to store important documents in the freezer. The contents of freezers almost always survive a fire. Sealing in vacuum seal bags would protect the contents.

  • Shadowbelle16

    Since we keep all our records in a bank safe deposit box, why would it be necessary to keep these at home to take up room in a car? All my credit cards, insurance cards, etc., are always with me in my purse.

    • Victoria

      One of the reasons that you keep your own set of records at home is that if you would die suddenly, certain assets such as bank accounts and safe deposit boxes can be frozen until your estate and taxes get settled.  I keep one set at home in a firesafe, and one set in the safe deposit box as backup, should the set at home be damaged or lost. 

      You cannot assume the bank will be open when you need your documents – emergencies happen at all hours, on holidays, and on weekends.   

  • Shadowbelle16@yahoo.com

    Since I keep all my records in a bank safe deposit box, is it still necessary to have these items with you in an emergency?

    • Tall Jennifer

      because, if power goes out the bank wont be open or if the bank is taken over you may not have access to your safe deposit box

  • Heather

    Just to say that I discovered your site by accident and think it is great! I always have found the subject of food storage and emergency preparedness rather overwhelming. You are making it nice and easy for me! Heather England

  • Colleenfay

    I love the idea of insulated bags for the car. I considered a tackle box, but I like your idea better because, and I’m breaking a rule here, I want to use a glass water container for my water instead of plastic (I will have a plastic bottle for back up) and even though the bottle will be wrapped in bubble warp, a soft sided container would be safer. My previous experience storing plastic water bottles in my trunk was that after a couple months, the water tasted and smelled horrible. Next stop…Walmart camping section. Thanks.

  • Meredith L Gardner

    Also, instead of disposables, it can be useful to put cloth diapers in your 72-hour kit. Then you don’t have to worry about sizes. If you don’t use them regularly already, just buy a package (or two) of cloth diapers at Wal-Mart or Target along with a few waterproof diaper covers and safety pins. Make sure you know how to use the diapers, and also wash them a few times before packing them away. They aren’t absorbent if you don’t wash them first.

  • Shootinironstables

    I teach my boy scouts to use their back packs (real ones not school bags) for their bug out bags, (72 hour kits) works perfectly!

  • Shootinironstables

    I teach my boy scouts to use their back packs (real ones not school bags) for their bug out bags, (72 hour kits) works perfectly!

  • M

    IN MY HOMETOWN THEY WANT US TO PREPARE FOR SEVEN DAYS! oops sorry all caps.

  • Michelle, San Jose, California

    By George!!! I think I’ve got it!!! I had a brainstorm idea this morning in response to my own concerns, and so many other concerns I’ve seen posted here, about storing your 72 hour kits in your car and concerns about heat, cold, cans exploding, or just the overall quality of your food when stored in the car for extended periods of time!!! First of all, instead of a milk jug (very creative idea though!), I opted to buy somewhat large insolated lunch totes for every member of my family. I found these at walmart yesterday (8/24/10) in the camping section for $5.88 each. My hope is that the lunch tote would not only insulate the food better, but would also allow a little more room as I was concerned about having enough food for my 6’4″ 265 pound hubby, and also wanted to carry a little extra for others in case we’re in a situation where others around us also need food (think Superdome, post hurricane Katrina for worst case scenarios in what lack of preparedness will do to a person’s sense of moral and ethical values).
    Anyway, long story short, I bought one extra personal cooler tote and filled it with all the same contents as the others I made, which are each identified for individual members of my family. This “spare” tote I then placed in a rubber storage bin in my back yard. My thought is that the rubber storage bin that is exposed to outdoor heat and cold temperatures as they vary throughout the year will be a good model for what the totes in the trunk of my car are experiencing, only a whole lot more accessible to me.
    Let’s face it… my car is for coming and going. I barely wash the thing, let alone regularly inventory and QC check the emergency supplies I’ll be keeping there. The small tote in my back yard can be worked into my weekly or monthly house cleaning schedule, so that I build a routing of opening it up once a month and checking cans for swelling. I can even keep a 2-litre of water out there and open it once a month to taste for the chemical leaching taste I was concerned about when faced with storing water in 2 litres in my trunk.
    Anyway, I hope this idea is helpful to people. I am just beginning this now so I don’t know what the outcomes will be with my first month’s check, but thought this might be a good solution for those who work outside of the home and for whom it makes more sense to carry your 72 hour kits in your car. Thanks!!!!

    • Colleenfay

      I love the idea of insulated bags for the car. I considered a tackle box, but I like your idea better because, and I’m breaking a rule here, I want to use a glass water container for my water instead of plastic (I will have a plastic bottle for back up) and even though the bottle will be wrapped in bubble warp, a soft sided container would be safer. My previous experience storing plastic water bottles in my trunk was that after a couple months, the water tasted and smelled horrible. Next stop…Walmart camping section. Thanks.

  • Michelle, San Jose, California

    By George!!! I think I’ve got it!!! I had a brainstorm idea this morning in response to my own concerns, and so many other concerns I’ve seen posted here, about storing your 72 hour kits in your car and concerns about heat, cold, cans exploding, or just the overall quality of your food when stored in the car for extended periods of time!!! First of all, instead of a milk jug (very creative idea though!), I opted to buy somewhat large insolated lunch totes for every member of my family. I found these at walmart yesterday (8/24/10) in the camping section for $5.88 each. My hope is that the lunch tote would not only insulate the food better, but would also allow a little more room as I was concerned about having enough food for my 6’4″ 265 pound hubby, and also wanted to carry a little extra for others in case we’re in a situation where others around us also need food (think Superdome, post hurricane Katrina for worst case scenarios in what lack of preparedness will do to a person’s sense of moral and ethical values).
    Anyway, long story short, I bought one extra personal cooler tote and filled it with all the same contents as the others I made, which are each identified for individual members of my family. This “spare” tote I then placed in a rubber storage bin in my back yard. My thought is that the rubber storage bin that is exposed to outdoor heat and cold temperatures as they vary throughout the year will be a good model for what the totes in the trunk of my car are experiencing, only a whole lot more accessible to me.
    Let’s face it… my car is for coming and going. I barely wash the thing, let alone regularly inventory and QC check the emergency supplies I’ll be keeping there. The small tote in my back yard can be worked into my weekly or monthly house cleaning schedule, so that I build a routing of opening it up once a month and checking cans for swelling. I can even keep a 2-litre of water out there and open it once a month to taste for the chemical leaching taste I was concerned about when faced with storing water in 2 litres in my trunk.
    Anyway, I hope this idea is helpful to people. I am just beginning this now so I don’t know what the outcomes will be with my first month’s check, but thought this might be a good solution for those who work outside of the home and for whom it makes more sense to carry your 72 hour kits in your car. Thanks!!!!

  • Jm

    I would like to add to your list in the binder is any deeds to property, and also any medical info needed.

  • Jm

    I would like to add to your list in the binder is any deeds to property, and also any medical info needed.

  • lori

    My husband gave me a car kit for Christmas at my request! It's been in our car for several years and has helped us many times – when I had little ones I always was using the fruit snacks and water. At a famliy reunion, one of our nieces was injured and we had the only antiseptic cream and bandaids. (We weren't very prepared as we were camping for a week with a group of 40!) Our car kit and our jumper cables never come out of the car!

  • Maria

    Here in PR we are being ask to be prepared for 96 hours (recommendations from the goverment and other authorities).

  • Maria

    Here in PR we are being ask to be prepared for 96 hours (recommendations from the goverment and other authorities).

    • M

      IN MY HOMETOWN THEY WANT US TO PREPARE FOR SEVEN DAYS! oops sorry all caps.

  • Let’s get prepared!

  • Let's get prepared!

  • DAWN RIGGS

    For people like me who live outside the U.S.A. it would be great if we knew what was in the 72 hour kit. I know you have them in Utah but not in Africa. Thank you for a v. useful site. Regards, DAWN RIGGS.

  • DAWN RIGGS

    For people like me who live outside the U.S.A. it would be great if we knew what was in the 72 hour kit. I know you have them in Utah but not in Africa. Thank you for a v. useful site. Regards, DAWN RIGGS.

  • Kristian

    For durability, you can't beat Army surplus. They were designed to last longer than one school year and survive combat. I live near Fort Bragg, NC and the surplus stores here are a gold mine. You can find a lot of surplus on ebay, but they are a bit more expensive.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for offering such a great site! My question is: where can I find a good backpack or bag for a survival kit or 72-hour kit? What do you store yours in? Maybe this is already addressed on this site, but I didn’t see it.
    Thanks!

    • Kristian

      For durability, you can’t beat Army surplus. They were designed to last longer than one school year and survive combat. I live near Fort Bragg, NC and the surplus stores here are a gold mine. You can find a lot of surplus on ebay, but they are a bit more expensive.

  • mdyj108

    Thanks for offering such a great site! My question is: where can I find a good backpack or bag for a survival kit or 72-hour kit? What do you store yours in? Maybe this is already addressed on this site, but I didn't see it.
    Thanks!

  • onepreparedmama

    I use a silicone-type menstrual cup. It will easily last 10 years if not way more. It is about 2″ deep and 1″ in diameter. I love it because it doesn't leak unlike other disposable products. Plus, it pays for itself in about 4 months of not having to buy disposable feminine hygiene products. I can swim and bathe with it..no problem. It is so easy to put in and I only have to take it out and empty it 2-3x/day. If you can use a diaphram, then you'd have no problem wiuth this as it is way smaller. Mine is called a Diva Cup, but I've also seen ones called “The Keeper.” The thing I like in regards to preparedness is that it is a single small item which one could keep in a 72 hour kit, then just take it out and use each month. That way you'd be sure to have it with you when needed. I got mine about 6 years ago and am pretty sure it was under $20…well worth the investment!

  • geriB

    wagon? rolling garbage can? rolling foot locker? babies one in front pack and the other in back pack would leave hands free. I have done a lot with many little ones. Practice is the key.

  • Anonymous

    Hey Jodi,
    I have a Question about Babies?
    I have two babies and I know that all this is important to have but how do I get all this together and diapers ready to run out the door if needed or in an earthquake even if it’s all ready to go I only have two hands and no car my babies take up my hands?
    Any ideas?

    • Anonymous

      wagon? rolling garbage can? rolling foot locker? babies one in front pack and the other in back pack would leave hands free. I have done a lot with many little ones. Practice is the key.

      • Meredith L Gardner

        Also, instead of disposables, it can be useful to put cloth diapers in your 72-hour kit. Then you don’t have to worry about sizes. If you don’t use them regularly already, just buy a package (or two) of cloth diapers at Wal-Mart or Target along with a few waterproof diaper covers and safety pins. Make sure you know how to use the diapers, and also wash them a few times before packing them away. They aren’t absorbent if you don’t wash them first.

    • Aliciacook_2

      How old are your kids? If they will fit, they make carriers that you wear for two kids. They are expensive, but if they grow out of it and you never use it, you can always resell it. That’ frees up your hands…?

    • Ryanandmarcelaine

      If I had to leave with my kids and no car, I would definitely be grabbing my double stroller, and I would put my baby on my back and my toddler and as much of the kit as could fit in the stroller. If my husband was with me, I’d have him bring along our single stroller too with more things packed into it. Other options include coolers with wheels or wagons. You don’t have to carry everything!

      • BashkirKurly

         We used to have red wagons available, too. You can fit quite a bit around a kid riding in one!

  • Jencuevas

    Hey Jodi,
    I have a Question about Babies?
    I have two babies and I know that all this is important to have but how do I get all this together and diapers ready to run out the door if needed or in an earthquake even if it's all ready to go I only have two hands and no car my babies take up my hands?
    Any ideas?

  • Anonymous

    When we camp we use the butane filled fire starters, they are kid safe and work in damp and windy conditions…I purchase them at the dollar tree…another thing we have used in steel wool and a 9 volt battery…you just rub the steel wool over the 9 volts connectors and the steel wool will spark…this is a chemical reaction so it works well in adverse conditions…just remember to always, always store the steel wool away from the battery, if it touches the connectors it will spark.

  • angela1104

    When we camp we use the butane filled fire starters, they are kid safe and work in damp and windy conditions…I purchase them at the dollar tree…another thing we have used in steel wool and a 9 volt battery…you just rub the steel wool over the 9 volts connectors and the steel wool will spark…this is a chemical reaction so it works well in adverse conditions…just remember to always, always store the steel wool away from the battery, if it touches the connectors it will spark.

  • Anonymous

    I have both a backpack & a Rubbermaid tote which have camping/emergency supplies in them. The tote is mainly supplemental stuff & includes cookware (including a collapsible silicone bowl), a solar-powered battery charger (for my NiMH batteries), & other goodies (extra first aid stuff, water filters, etc.). I also bought a folding cart w/ large wheels (large wheels roll over rough terrain better than small ones–I got mine @ Costco) to transport my stuff (I have cables to attach the tote to the cart). Because the tote is flat on top, I can also bring a sleeping bag/blankets/tent w/ me, while leaving my hands relatively free. W/ regards to my backpack, I managed to save room in it by buying one of those bottled emergency kits & clipped it to a strap on my backpack. Another thing–I worked at a state park this summer, & met a family who was practicing their 10 min. evacuation plan. They forgot some things, but now that they’ve practiced, they’ll be better prepared for the real deal. I thought it was great to see them actually “evacuating” (albeit to the park)–the kids had a blast & it was a good learning experience. It’s something to consider actually DOING in the near future.

  • leia_tyndall

    I have both a backpack & a Rubbermaid tote which have camping/emergency supplies in them. The tote is mainly supplemental stuff & includes cookware (including a collapsible silicone bowl), a solar-powered battery charger (for my NiMH batteries), & other goodies (extra first aid stuff, water filters, etc.). I also bought a folding cart w/ large wheels (large wheels roll over rough terrain better than small ones–I got mine @ Costco) to transport my stuff (I have cables to attach the tote to the cart). Because the tote is flat on top, I can also bring a sleeping bag/blankets/tent w/ me, while leaving my hands relatively free. W/ regards to my backpack, I managed to save room in it by buying one of those bottled emergency kits & clipped it to a strap on my backpack. Another thing–I worked at a state park this summer, & met a family who was practicing their 10 min. evacuation plan. They forgot some things, but now that they've practiced, they'll be better prepared for the real deal. I thought it was great to see them actually “evacuating” (to the park)–the kids had a blast & it was a good learning experience. It's something to consider actually DOING in the near future.

  • Kristian

    I cannot emphasize how important a “swiss-army-knife” is for any kit. I have one for each family member. be sure to get one with the following:
    – blades (of course)
    – scissors
    – small saw
    – can opener (always good to have)
    – bottle opener
    – screwdriver
    – magnifying glass (to start a fire with sunlight – save those matches!)

    The ones I purchased (the Explorer model) had all these features and more. The are about $40.00 each, but make great Christmas gifts.

  • Kristian

    I cannot emphasize how important a “swiss-army-knife” is for any kit. I have one for each family member. be sure to get one with the following:
    – blades (of course)
    – scissors
    – small saw
    – can opener (always good to have)
    – bottle opener
    – screwdriver
    – magnifying glass (to start a fire with sunlight – save those matches!)

    The ones I purchased (the Explorer model) had all these features and more. The are about $40.00 each, but make great Christmas gifts.

  • Anonymous

    Disaster supplies: You missed something important in the parenthetical portion of the entry for hygiene products. Feminine hygiene products. The last thing you need in any type of emergency, major or minor, is to deal with the added stress of not having what you need and not being able to go get some at the store.

    For those members who aren’t female, they are still suggested for two reasons; you never know who you are going to be with when something bad happens and they have a host of other uses. For instance, pads are made for absorbing blood. If you have a wound which is bleeding sanitary pads are great on top of a little gauze to help stop bleeding.

    • Anonymous

      I use a silicone-type menstrual cup. It will easily last 10 years if not way more. It is about 2″ deep and 1″ in diameter. I love it because it doesn’t leak unlike other disposable products. Plus, it pays for itself in about 4 months of not having to buy disposable feminine hygiene products. I can swim and bathe with it..no problem. It is so easy to put in and I only have to take it out and empty it 2-3x/day. If you can use a diaphram, then you’d have no problem wiuth this as it is way smaller. Mine is called a Diva Cup, but I’ve also seen ones called “The Keeper.” The thing I like in regards to preparedness is that it is a single small item which one could keep in a 72 hour kit, then just take it out and use each month. That way you’d be sure to have it with you when needed. I got mine about 6 years ago and am pretty sure it was under $20…well worth the investment!

  • pukwudjivc

    Disaster supplies: You missed something important in the parenthetical portion of the entry for hygiene products. Feminine hygiene products. The last thing you need in any type of emergency, major or minor, is to deal with the added stress of not having what you need and not being able to go get some at the store.

    For those members who aren't female, they are still suggested for two reasons; you never know who you are going to be with when something bad happens and they have a host of other uses. For instance, pads are made for absorbing blood. If you have a wound which is bleeding sanitary pads are great on top of a little gauze to help stop bleeding.

  • Anonymous

    i need to update my binder. i last updated it two years ago. i have to input my latest tax return!

  • mgariley

    i need to update my binder. i last updated it two years ago. i have to input my latest tax return!

  • Jan, I haven't heard of it, but I am definitely not an expert on camping/emergency prep type stuff. This is something we are working on learning more about. So thanks for sharing the tip! We will definitely look into it more.

  • Jan Rasmussen

    Have you seen or heard of Insta-Fire? – this stuff is amazing – You can use it to cook your food and just a little of it – like a half cup will burn for 15 – 20 minutes. We have found this to be plenty of time to cook our food, boil water etc. And has a shelf life (they claim) of 30 years. We use it to camp, hike, snowmobile and store in our food storage. We have used it on the snow, in the rain, windy conditions. We really like it. I know they sell to the military and survival places and are just starting to sell it retail. We have put it in our food storage and our 72 hour kits. I would like to know your thoughts and if you know anything about it. Is there any negatives about it?

    • Jan, I haven’t heard of it, but I am definitely not an expert on camping/emergency prep type stuff. This is something we are working on learning more about. So thanks for sharing the tip! We will definitely look into it more.

  • Jan Rasmussen

    Have you seen or heard of Insta-Fire? – this stuff is amazing – You can use it to cook your food and just a little of it – like a half cup will burn for 15 – 20 minutes. We have found this to be plenty of time to cook our food, boil water etc. And has a shelf life (they claim) of 30 years. We use it to camp, hike, snowmobile and store in our food storage. We have used it on the snow, in the rain, windy conditions. We really like it. I know they sell to the military and survival places and are just starting to sell it retail. We have put it in our food storage and our 72 hour kits. I would like to know your thoughts and if you know anything about it. Is there any negatives about it?

  • Jennifer, think of the car kit as something you will have in case you have car trouble and are stranded somewhere. You would want first aid, maybe some snacks, things for kids to do, etc. Your disaster kit MAY be similar. If you have a car at home during the day then you may not need to double up and first aid kit, etc. because if you evacuated you would be going in your car. However, I don't have a car at home so I would want to have those items separate in my disaster kit at home so I can take them with me and evacuate on foot, with a neighbor, etc. Does that help clear things up a bit?

  • Jennifer

    This is a great site. Thanks for all of the wonderful info! I’m working my way through the babysteps and I’m on # 2. I’m confused about the difference between a car kit and disasters kit? It looks like the same stuff. Are you suggesting I make two very similar kits and keep one in the car and one in the house?

    Jennifer

    • Jennifer, think of the car kit as something you will have in case you have car trouble and are stranded somewhere. You would want first aid, maybe some snacks, things for kids to do, etc. Your disaster kit MAY be similar. If you have a car at home during the day then you may not need to double up and first aid kit, etc. because if you evacuated you would be going in your car. However, I don’t have a car at home so I would want to have those items separate in my disaster kit at home so I can take them with me and evacuate on foot, with a neighbor, etc. Does that help clear things up a bit?

      • Polly

        I have had a document binder like the one show, for years. However, anyplace we might need to show a document never accepts copies, only the originals on the special state watermarked paper, so I’m not sure how that will work out.

        • BashkirKurly

           We actually have the originals in special waterproof bags (we go them at a camping store) in a small lightweight fireproof box. These important papers and computer disks are in a closet by the front door ready to grab. We have a child assigned to “the green bag” by the door. We have copies in our safe deposit box and with our file cabinet as more of a last resort backup.

    • lori

      My husband gave me a car kit for Christmas at my request! It’s been in our car for several years and has helped us many times – when I had little ones I always was using the fruit snacks and water. At a famliy reunion, one of our nieces was injured and we had the only antiseptic cream and bandaids. (We weren’t very prepared as we were camping for a week with a group of 40!) Our car kit and our jumper cables never come out of the car!

  • Jennifer

    This is a great site. Thanks for all of the wonderful info! I'm working my way through the babysteps and I'm on # 2. I'm confused about the difference between a car kit and disasters kit? It looks like the same stuff. Are you suggesting I make two very similar kits and keep one in the car and one in the house?

    Jennifer

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