Step 7: Baking Ingredients

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Purchase items necessary for baking such as oil, sugar, powdered milk, salt, etc.

Key Points

  • The ingredients in Step 7 are all the necessary fats, oils, sugars, milk, and miscellaneous items that you need to put food storage meals and recipes together.
  • Purchasing these items when on sale, then rotating through your stored supplies can save you time and money.
  • Find ways to use these ingredients in your everyday cooking, start learning how to make things from scratch. Check out our Cooking From Scratch Page for some ideas on how to do this.
  • Look at our article “What Can You Do With YOUR Food Storage” to see what additional items you can make by adding these items to your storage.
  • Determine the quantities of each food item you will need to store. For more information, see BabyStep 4.

Fats and Oils

  • Salad Dressings can be store bought and stored, or you can make your own oil and vinegar-based, or mayonnaise-based dressings with items you have on hand in your food storage. Be aware of expiration dates on store bought salad dressings.
  • Cooking Oil such as canola, or vegetable oil can be used in most bread recipes. Unless they have been specially treated, *unopened* cooking oils have a shelf life of about a year.
  • Shortening has a longer shelf life than oils, it is reasonable to expect an unopened metal can of shortening to have a shelf life of eight to ten years if kept reasonably cool, particularly if it has preservatives in it.
  • Mayonnaise can be used in baked dishes, pasta salads, salad dressings, and much more. Although it isn’t necessary to sustain life, it sure makes things taste better. Mayonnaise has a shelf life of 2-3 months.
  • Peanut Butter provides protein and monounsaturated fats (the good fat). Peanut butter has a shelf life of 6-9 months.

Sugars

  • Powdered Fruit Drink comes in many different flavors and can be used in daily use and in times of emergency as stored water can have a funny taste. Powdered drink mixes can be stored for up to 3 years if unopened.
  • Brown Sugar can be used in many baked goods and even some bread recipes. It can be stored up to 6 months. Be careful to seal it tightly between uses if you have opened your sugar. Some people choose to store white sugar and molasses to make their own brown sugar to avoid dealing with shelf life issues.
  • Molasses and Corn Syrup are used as sweeteners in many recipes. Store according to your families needs. Molasses may be something you have never used, nor ever will use. If this is the case, don’t feel the need to store it. If you choose not to store brown sugar, you will want to store MORE molasses in order to make your own.
  • Flavored Gelatin is used in molded desserts and salads and to thicken cold soups.
  • Jams or Preserves is covered in Baby Step 8 (Fruits and Vegetables)
  • Granulated Sugar is used in almost all food storage recipes and is very important to store. Sugar has a shelf life of 20+years.
  • Honey is another sweetener found in a lot of food storage recipes. Honey is more expensive then sugar and usually acts as a substitute for sugar in breads. Some people feel it is healthier to use honey than sugar.

Powdered Milk

  • Nonfat Dry Milk is much cheaper then regular milk. To make your nonfat milk taste better, try adding 1 tsp of sugar, and 1 tsp of vanilla to a gallon.
  • Evaporated Milk can be stored in cans, or made from nonfat dry milk. To make a 12 oz can of evaporated milk from dry milk, mix 1-1/2 C. Water and 1/2 C. + 1 T. Dry Powdered Milk and blend very well.

Miscellaneous

  • Baking Soda, Salt and Baking Powder are used in most recipes and if unopened have indefinite shelf lives. Definitely make sure to keep these ingredients on hand for your favorite recipes.
  • Active dry yeast is the form of yeast most commonly available to noncommercial bakers, as well as the yeast of choice for situations where long travel or uncontrolled storage conditions are likely.
  • Instant yeast appears similar to active dry yeast, but has smaller granules with substantially higher percentages of live cells. It is more perishable than active dry yeast, but also does not require rehydration, and can usually be added directly to all but the driest doughs.

Other Dairy

  • Powdered Eggs can be used to create a lot of different recipes that will help you have variety in your diet in an emergency. They are also cheaper than regular eggs so rotating them into your regular cooking makes a lot of sense.
  • Butter can be purchased in powder or canned form. We don’t recommend canning your own butter due to health reasons, but commercially canned should be fine. Storing butter is not very cost effective so we don’t recommend storing a lot of it or making a large effort to rotate it into everyday cooking.
  • Sour cream is available in powdered form if it is something you really would miss if you were living in emergency circumstances. We don’t find it necessary but some people may wish to store keep a little on hand just in case.

More Information

Where to Buy Baking Ingredients

 

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  • Ruthybearor

    I am working on my baking supplies but what is the best way to store sugar. In a bucket, in the original bag? Any one Thank you

  • Ajwoolums

    I used my powered eggs for the first time in a chocolate chip cookie recipe this past week. Wonderful results. I think they were better than cookies I have made with actual eggs. Thank you for all your hard work on this site. 

  • Anonymous

    OKAY I LOVE THE BABY STEPS. My question is where do I put them in the binder? I started putting them in the front but they seem to fit in different sections. Did I miss the directions?

  • Rebben

    Cooking oils will last for years in a cool environment. To test this, pour some in an open glass jar and leave in a coolish place in your home. A windowsill in the fall or winter is a good spot if not in direct sunlight. Write a date on the jar. Then leave it. It might collect buggies from the air, dust, etc., but you’re not going to use this oil. This is only a test for your own information to demonstrate just how long oil remains viable completely open to air at room temperature AND for you to know when oil is rancid.

    Smell the oil once a week. You must know what your oil smells like when fresh for you to determine when it is rancid.

    You will be shocked to find out how long your exposed oil will remain viable.

    My canola oil is still viable, with a date of 11/97/2008. I’ve store corn oil for 10 years. Olive oil is virtually indestructable. Expiration dates on most storebought items are fallacy. Once the FDA required them, manufacturers figured out that they could increase sales by making sure the dates did NOT reflect reality

    • regularmom

      I agree that expiration dates are unreliable, however, I have had Olive Oil go rancid several times over the last 10 years. I keep it stored in my cool/dark food storage room too. What am I doing differently?

  • gary

    How can you bring brown sugar back to powder when it gets hard?

    • To avoid brown sugar from hardening put it into a container after opening and place a piece of bread in the container. The bread will not mold. We have kept the same piece of bread in our container for months. If your brown sugar is hard you can still put it into a container with a piece of bread. This will bring moisture back to the brown sugar.

  • brchbell

    I vacuum seal raisin's, coconut, chocolate chips, nuts, brown sugar, ect and they last for several years. Check your seals twice a year on your canning jars in case one loses it's seal. No more rancid, nuts, ect!!!!

  • Anonymous

    I vacuum seal raisin’s, coconut, chocolate chips, nuts, brown sugar, ect and they last for several years. Check your seals twice a year on your canning jars in case one loses it’s seal. No more rancid, nuts, ect!!!!

    • Red_rooster1998

      can you use o2 absorbers?

  • aPayne

    Canning butter has not been tested for safety by the USDA so it is not recommended. Call your county extension office for more information 🙂

  • kdonat

    If you find that your cooking oil or shortening has gone rancid before you can used it up, don't through it out. Or, if you have a quantity of “used” fryer oil, you can recyle it as fuel in a homemade oil lamp. Check out the following site for easy directions.
    http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/homema

  • Anonymous

    If you find that your cooking oil or shortening has gone rancid before you can used it up, don’t through it out. Or, if you have a quantity of “used” fryer oil, you can recyle it as fuel in a homemade oil lamp. Check out the following site for easy directions.
    http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/homemade-oil-lamp.htm

  • kdonat

    If you find that your cooking oil or shortening has gone rancid before you can used it up, don't through it out. Or, if you have a quantity of “used” fryer oil, you can recyle it as fuel in a homemade oil lamp. Check out the following site for easy directions.
    http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/homema

  • Merry

    Try to find a good inexpensive solar oven. They work great!

  • Very nice information and tips!

  • Karen19

    Very nice information and tips!

  • Anonymous

    How long does yeast keep? It seems to me that it wouldn’t keep very long…

  • missjacki

    How long does yeast keep? It seems to me that it wouldn't keep very long…

  • Anonymous

    Just saw that great tutorial on milk and saw the blurb on Magic Mix. How long will your Magic Mix (white sauce) keep in the fridge?

  • ds1951

    Just saw that great tutorial on milk and saw the blurb on Magic Mix. How long will your Magic Mix (white sauce) keep in the fridge?

  • Thank you good information.
    I must to bookmark this page indeed.

  • Thank you good information.
    I must to bookmark this page indeed.

  • lindasorden

    Great tip this one is going in my food storage notebook Thanks

  • Lisa, You can also make buttermilk by just adding one tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice to 1 cup of regular or powdered milk. This is what I like doing so I don't have to store a separate ingredient. Plus I NEVER have buttermilk on hand so it is WAY convenient!

  • Anonymous

    While in Wal-Mart over the weekend I saw something I have never seen or heard of before…powdered buttermilk. It came in a small can, just like shortening does. I thought that would be a good addition to the food storage closet.

    • Lisa, You can also make buttermilk by just adding one tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice to 1 cup of regular or powdered milk. This is what I like doing so I don’t have to store a separate ingredient. Plus I NEVER have buttermilk on hand so it is WAY convenient!

      • Anonymous

        Great tip this one is going in my food storage notebook Thanks

      • Rebben

        Wow, since when does vinegar or lemon juice added to milk replace the rue of churned whole milk with the butter flecks? Buttermilk is simply residue left from the churning process. Today, buttermilk bought in the store is generally only milk (skim, lowfat or whole) with culture added to it. Basically, buttermilk is a more liquid form of yogurt.

        The powdered buttermilk is wonderful and we have used it for years because, as Jodi says, it’s not convenient to keep buttermilk (or even yogurt) on hand if it’s not a part of the daily food intake. It’s great in pancakes and quick breads.

    • regularmom

      No, you probably already bought it, but so did I. Then I quickly forgot about it and continued making my own buttermilk with regular milk and vinegar. Oops. Live and learn.

    • Diane

      I use powdered buttermilk all the time, and it works great! 

  • lisafortner

    While in Wal-Mart over the weekend I saw something I have never seen or heard of before…powdered buttermilk. It came in a small can, just like shortening does. I thought that would be a good addition to the food storage closet.

  • What a great tip. I never knew that baking powder wouldn't last very long, and I definitely didn't know the recipe to make your own. I've got lots of cream of tarter and baking soda on hand so this is great news for me! Thanks for sharing.

  • Linda, We have seen some stuff about canning butter before but have also heard that there are some safety issues with it so we haven't wanted to recommend it to our readers until we could research it more.

  • Linda Sorden

    recently found an a rticle on the web that tells how to can butter here
    http://www.endtimesreport.com/canning_butter.html i had bever heard of that they call it sunshine in a jar 🙂 what a nice thing to have on your shelves.

    • Linda, We have seen some stuff about canning butter before but have also heard that there are some safety issues with it so we haven’t wanted to recommend it to our readers until we could research it more.

      • Rebben

        Canned butter is available at many food storage outlets. The best brand is Blue Feather, made in New Zealand, and it’s the cheapest. It will store for many years and the taste of it is wonderful. They also make canned cheese. There are many testimonials to its longevity and safety. And, of course, since it’s sold in the USA, it has expiration dates on it, which you can completely ignore. Store in a cool place…it does NOT need refrigeration until opened (and even then, most butter won’t spoil at room temperature for weeks).

        • Blue Feather Canned Butter is WONDERFUL!! My dad and I shared a case about 4 years ago. Last summer, when I was at my parents home, they wanted grilled cheese sandwiches. They did not have any butter so I went down stairs to get one of his canned butters. The perfect opportunity to try this butter out. It was soooooo creamy and tasted better than any butter I have ever had. My mom could not believe how good the sandwiches were. I would highly recommend storing this butter.

    • aPayne

      Canning butter has not been tested for safety by the USDA so it is not recommended. Call your county extension office for more information 🙂

  • Linda Sorden

    recently found an a rticle on the web that tells how to can butter here
    http://www.endtimesreport.com/canning_butter.html i had bever heard of that they call it sunshine in a jar 🙂 what a nice thing to have on your shelves.

  • Anonymous

    Baking powder will lose its power over a relativly short period of time, but if you want to make your own BP just mix 2 Tablespoons of Cream of Tarter and 1 Tablespoon of Baking Soda. These two items will store indefinately. I wouldn’t want to be with out them.

    • What a great tip. I never knew that baking powder wouldn’t last very long, and I definitely didn’t know the recipe to make your own. I’ve got lots of cream of tarter and baking soda on hand so this is great news for me! Thanks for sharing.

  • dorothysandaker

    Baking powder will lose its power over a relativly short period of time, but if you want to make your own BP just mix 2 Tablespoons of Cream of Tarter and 1 Tablespoon of Baking Soda. These two items will store indefinately. I wouldn't want to be with out them.

  • Anonymous

    I have a container of canola oil that I bought at Costco a little while ago. It is not past the expiration, but has a darker coloring to it than when I first bought it. How do I know if the oil I have is bad? I’m affraid to use it. 🙂

  • linzjen

    I have a container of canola oil that I bought at Costco a little while ago. It is not past the expiration, but has a darker coloring to it than when I first bought it. How do I know if the oil I have is bad? I'm affraid to use it. 🙂

  • kdonat

    Michelle, I had similar thoughts as we aren't big bread eaters. Biscuits, pancakes, tortillas, and other “small” sized quick breads can be done in a covered skillet over some form of “canned” heat (buddy burner, alcohol burner), or use a solar oven . Another concern when the power is out is cooking items that will use the least amount of fuel to do the job.

    There are several sources for creating buddy burners (Girl and Boy Scout Handbook, You-Tube,), alcohol stoves, and solar ovens (mine started with the mylar type windshield reflector that you normally place on your car dashboard and other items from my kitchen).

  • We don't rotate our eggs too often either. It's good to have for an emergency but not a huge benefit to rotating. We offer butter as an option because some people really enjoy having spreadable butter on their homemade bread so it could be a nice touch to have in an emergency. That's why they are under the “optional” section. Just things for people to think about.

  • HW

    I store powdered eggs, but they are more expensive in my area than regular eggs, so I only rotate when necessary. I don’t think storing butter is necessary since most recipes you can substitute oil or shortening, both of which store well.

    • We don’t rotate our eggs too often either. It’s good to have for an emergency but not a huge benefit to rotating. We offer butter as an option because some people really enjoy having spreadable butter on their homemade bread so it could be a nice touch to have in an emergency. That’s why they are under the “optional” section. Just things for people to think about.

  • HW

    I store powdered eggs, but they are more expensive in my area than regular eggs, so I only rotate when necessary. I don't think storing butter is necessary since most recipes you can substitute oil or shortening, both of which store well.

  • Kim

    This is a great list. I would add a good selection of spices and spice blends too. With these you can really improve the flavor of pantry basics. Here is a link to some of my favorites:

    http://allaboutfoodstorage.com/?s=spices

    • Jodi — Food Storage Made Easy

      Kim, we talk about spices and condiments as part of step 8. We kind of consider them comfort foods since you don’t really NEED them but they sure are nice to have! We definitely agree that it is something people need to store!

  • Kim

    This is a great list. I would add a good selection of spices and spice blends too. With these you can really improve the flavor of pantry basics. Here is a link to some of my favorites:

    http://allaboutfoodstorage.com/?s=spices

    • Jodi — Food Storage Made Easy

      Kim, we talk about spices and condiments as part of step 8. We kind of consider them comfort foods since you don’t really NEED them but they sure are nice to have! We definitely agree that it is something people need to store!

  • Jennifer

    Tracy – There is a recipe for French toast using powdered eggs and powdered milk in the book ‘Emergency Food Storage and Survival Handbook’.
    I’m not the author (nor do I get anything from mentioning the book), so I’m sure it would be bad of me to post the recipe – but it’s on page 222 if you get the chance to buy it/look at it. The author ( peggy layton) also has a book spcifically about cooking with storage foods, but I don’t have it or know if it’s any good.

  • Jennifer

    Tracy – There is a recipe for French toast using powdered eggs and powdered milk in the book ‘Emergency Food Storage and Survival Handbook’.
    I’m not the author (nor do I get anything from mentioning the book), so I’m sure it would be bad of me to post the recipe – but it’s on page 222 if you get the chance to buy it/look at it. The author ( peggy layton) also has a book spcifically about cooking with storage foods, but I don’t have it or know if it’s any good.

  • Tracy in Utah

    We try to keep about a case of powdered eggs on hand all the time and bake with them regularly. But, we dont know how to use the powdered eggs to make French toast. Any ideas? Thanks.

  • Tracy in Utah

    We try to keep about a case of powdered eggs on hand all the time and bake with them regularly. But, we dont know how to use the powdered eggs to make French toast. Any ideas? Thanks.

  • Jennifer

    Here is a website so that you can can your own butter: http://www.endtimesreport.com/canning_butter.html

    Michelle – You can use a dutch oven to bake some breads using chorcoals or fire. Just make sure to get the kind with the sunk lid for the coals. Also, here is a website for an ouside ‘oven’/stove/canner that you can make yourself:
    http://www.omick.net/cooker/cooker.htm

  • Jennifer

    Here is a website so that you can can your own butter: http://www.endtimesreport.com/canning_butter.html

    Michelle – You can use a dutch oven to bake some breads using chorcoals or fire. Just make sure to get the kind with the sunk lid for the coals. Also, here is a website for an ouside ‘oven’/stove/canner that you can make yourself:
    http://www.omick.net/cooker/cooker.htm

  • Michelle

    Hope this doesn’t sound ignorant, but how would you bake bread if you lost electricity? Unfortunately we don’t have a gas stove. I am at a loss as to what I would do with these big bags of wheat/flour with no oven.

  • Michelle

    Hope this doesn’t sound ignorant, but how would you bake bread if you lost electricity? Unfortunately we don’t have a gas stove. I am at a loss as to what I would do with these big bags of wheat/flour with no oven.

    • Anonymous

      Michelle, I had similar thoughts as we aren’t big bread eaters. Biscuits, pancakes, tortillas, and other “small” sized quick breads can be done in a covered skillet over some form of “canned” heat (buddy burner, alcohol burner), or use a solar oven . Another concern when the power is out is cooking items that will use the least amount of fuel to do the job.

      There are several sources for creating buddy burners (Girl and Boy Scout Handbook, You-Tube,), alcohol stoves, and solar ovens (mine started with the mylar type windshield reflector that you normally place on your car dashboard and other items from my kitchen).

      • Merry

        Try to find a good inexpensive solar oven. They work great!

  • Morning Sunshine

    hillbillyhousewife.com has some great recipes for dry milk: yogurt, cheese (including the cottage cheese Heather was looking for – it is under the heading for “curds and whey.”), and hot cocoas.

  • Morning Sunshine

    hillbillyhousewife.com has some great recipes for dry milk: yogurt, cheese (including the cottage cheese Heather was looking for – it is under the heading for “curds and whey.”), and hot cocoas.

  • Angel

    Along with the canned butter, there is dried butter in #10 cans. I have not tried it yet but it is something to look into for longer term storage.
    Gotta have butter for the bread right! :o)

  • Angel

    Along with the canned butter, there is dried butter in #10 cans. I have not tried it yet but it is something to look into for longer term storage.
    Gotta have butter for the bread right! :o)

  • Kristen

    My husband’s family grew up drinking powdered milk. I gave it a go when we got married and we’ve found that if you add anywhere from 1/2 to a whole can of evaporated milk to a gallon of powdered milk, it makes it taste a little more creamy.

  • Kristen

    My husband’s family grew up drinking powdered milk. I gave it a go when we got married and we’ve found that if you add anywhere from 1/2 to a whole can of evaporated milk to a gallon of powdered milk, it makes it taste a little more creamy.

  • Liz

    You can substitute dry milk in most soft cheese and yoghurt recipes. Here is a recipe for a soft farmer’s cheese: http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Cheese/Farmers_Cheese.htm

    Very easy to do, and tastes better than store-bought.

  • Liz

    You can substitute dry milk in most soft cheese and yoghurt recipes. Here is a recipe for a soft farmer’s cheese: http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Cheese/Farmers_Cheese.htm

    Very easy to do, and tastes better than store-bought.

  • Heather

    An older sister told me she once took a class on how to make cottage cheese from her dry milk… unfortunately she couldn’t remember the details. Do you have any info on making cheese from powdered milk?

  • Heather

    An older sister told me she once took a class on how to make cottage cheese from her dry milk… unfortunately she couldn’t remember the details. Do you have any info on making cheese from powdered milk?

  • John

    It seems that you are missing out on butter. I saw something called Red Feather Canned Butter, which is a big part of a lot of recipes and American cooking. I’ m not selling the stuff, but if the power went out, I’d like to have the comfort of my favorite spread on my home made bread.

    Just be advised it’s a bit pricey per case.

  • John

    It seems that you are missing out on butter. I saw something called Red Feather Canned Butter, which is a big part of a lot of recipes and American cooking. I’ m not selling the stuff, but if the power went out, I’d like to have the comfort of my favorite spread on my home made bread.

    Just be advised it’s a bit pricey per case.

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