Food Storage and Allergies – Let’s give this a try


If you follow us on facebook, you may have seen the post I did last weekend stating:

We have some good friends from home visiting us this weekend. Just found out my the wife can’t eat gluten. I had a pretty good menu planned, now I feel like I’m handcuffed. We practiced this in our 7 day challenge, but this feels harder.

Now before you all get after my friend’s wife… her allergy isn’t super severe, and she didn’t want to inconvenience me, so her plan was to just work around any gluten I was going to be serving, not make a fuss and deal with the ramifications. Well her husband let the secret out, and even though she kept assuring me not to change the menu, I couldn’t help but TRY!

For the past couple of years, we have been getting the question:”How do I do food storage if I have an allergy to “insert food item here?”. We most commonly, get the question about gluten – which is why we made a day of it in our 7 day challenge last fall. See more about that here.

POSTS ON ALLERGIES AND FOOD STORAGE


We’ve tried to do a few posts to help a little, but admit we haven’t been very thorough yet. Here are a few things we’ve done to TRY and address it:

While we know this isn’t all inclusive, they have been our attempt to help a little. I’ll admit I was really thrown for a loop by having my friend over for the weekend, when I had PLANNED to make pizza, cinnamon rolls, pancakes, and other gluten filled foods. I spent the full weekend really pondering how would I DEAL with this if I was all of a sudden unable to eat gluten – or some other food.

ADAPTING TO THE ALLERGY


Well I STARTED to formulate a plan. The first thing I would do is start living my new life, and see how I adapt. I’ll use gluten as an example, since it is so common. I think there would be 2 main ways of dealing with this. I’m guessing you may choose to go all one way, or a do a variety. Either way…. I think you would choose:

  1. To go forward living without the types of foods that contain gluten, make other choices and stock accordingly. For example, you would maybe choose to eat more rice, corn, quinoa, and a variety of other grains and make meals that these grains are typically found in. In other words, say adios to breads etc. OR
  2. To go forward trying to modify recipes that typically contain gluten to allow yourself to eat foods like the foods you are used to. For example, you may find a way to make pizza dough, breads, pancakes and other pastries using substitutions that are gluten free.

I think it would be silly to try and remake a whole food storage plan, before you figured out what your new lifestyle will hold if you got diagnosed with a gluten (or any other) allergy. I know my friend told me she has just stayed away from gluten food replacements like gluten free breads, pizzas and pastas, and just stuck with other foods. I think I would do some of that, with a lot of research and hard work to come up with ways to still be able to eat breads, pizza, and pastas- because I love them so much! Maybe I would get over them a little, but I think I’d for sure try. So that’s my point, after seeing how I would adapt to the allergy, THEN I would formulate a plan based on what foods I had in my new diet.

MAKING THE PLAN


In my plan for “if I had an allergy”, I decided I would go to BabyStep 4, and rethink it. We have an excel spreadsheet that contains a list of foods for a common one year supply. I would use that list of a starting point, and then I would start doing replacements. In our FAQ on our calculators post, we talk about doing replacements on the spreadsheet, and show you how. So, for example, if I couldn’t eat wheat, I would replace pound for pound other grains in place of wheat.

If I had decided on trying to make pizza doughs and breads gluten free, I would ADD to the calculator the ingredients needed for that. I’m still very new to the gluten free world, but I know there are ways of making flours gluten free with ingredients that do the job of gluten. Something like Xanthan Gum? Don’t judge me if that’s not the right word, I’M NEW and ADMITTEDLY not that rad at this gluten free stuff!

So if I had to break it down step by step:

  1. Determine what foods you eat
  2. Replace foods you can’t eat on a standard calculator
  3. Add foods you need to make your new diet come together to the standard calculator

Ok, so now I can’t claim to be an expert in all this allergy stuff, but I can at least say, I’ve been really thinking about it. We’ll continue to give it more thought, and hopefully more posts in the future.

  • http://www.facebook.com/sheila.shepardson Sheila Shepardson

    I have a recipe that my nutritionist said was excellent. Cheesy Quinoa…. I cup rinsed quinoa, 2 cups of broth or water, 1 14 ounce can of tomatoes, garlic, rosemary, basil, tarragon, salt, pepper, onions to taste. and 1 cup of shredded cheese. The spices are as desired,,,I use about 1 tsp of each except the salt (1/2 tsp) cook the quinoa in chosen liquid until liquid absorbed and then add the cheese. When cheese melts,,serve…if any left over,,,use broth or water to reheat.. If you are using freeze dried cheese add before liquid is absorbed…add any vegetables desired using your discretion if using fresh or freeze dried ingredients. I have used left over meat, etc or more tomatoes…very versatile recipe…this is my own recipe that I devised after finding out I was gluten intolerant. It is easily adjustable to freeze dried foods that I have on hand. add broccoli, green beans or any other foods. cooking time is approximately 25-30 minutes…Hope you enjoy this…I like this and every one that tries it likes it…Would appreciate comments if you try it.

    • http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net Jodi and Julie

      Thanks for sharing the recipe!

  • http://accidentalhobbiest.blogspot.com/ The Accidental Hobbiest

    I dealt with this with my son.  I had all this lovely food storage and after one trip to the Dr. felt like I had a pile of poison instead and asked myself how I was ever going to make all this work.  It hasn’t been without trial and error, but I will say that you can definitely have food storage and people with severe allergies.  You modify and collect recipes that work and ditch the ones that don’t.  One huge benefit of food storage type cooking when you have allergies is you know exactly what went into your food and your more often then not safer still even with allergies using food storage.  Last I wanted to share that gluten comes out when you knead dough so unless your full on celiac you can still have wheat products like pancakes, corn bread and even banana bread, none of which require kneading, but you likely can’t have regular bread or biscuits or pizza dough.  Everyone is different, but this is one thing we have been able to differentiate about at our house.  Best of luck!

  • Guest

    I dealt with this with my son.  I had all this lovely food storage and after one trip to the Dr. felt like I had a pile of poison instead and asked myself how I was ever going to make all this work.  It hasn’t been without trial and error, but I will say that you can definitely have food storage and people with severe allergies.  You modify and collect recipes that work and ditch the ones that don’t.  One huge benefit of food storage type cooking when you have allergies is you know exactly what went into your food and your more often then not safer still even with allergies using food storage.  Last I wanted to share that gluten comes out when you knead dough so unless your full on celiac you can still have wheat products like pancakes, corn bread and even banana bread, none of which require kneading, but you likely can’t have regular bread or biscuits or pizza dough.  Everyone is different, but this is one thing we have been able to differentiate about at our house.  Best of luck!

  • Herbal_homestead

    Just as we began our food storage, we found out my sister is gluten intolerant (which just for information purposes, isn’t an allergy.  It’s a genetic thing).  Since we knew from the start that wheat, rye, barley and oats were out, we aimed our food storage that way.  We’ve added more grains like rice, quinoa, beans, etc. in place of wheat berries.  That grain mill has come in very handy in making up my own flour mixes that I use in all sorts of dishes in place of wheat flour.  One of the main things to remember in making up baked goods with non-wheat flours is the addition of proteins to hold the mix together with.  Adding eggs and gelatin is a great way to accomplish this.  Sometimes you can get pretty close to what you are used to without having to use exotic ingredients.

    I’ve also searched out and stocked up on gluten free cookbooks to have lots of recipes on hand.  Be careful though.  Many of them are simply recipes for entrees that never would have contained wheat in the first place.  The baking ones are what you’re really looking for.

    I would like to recommend the Floured Apron Bakery in Pagosa Springs, Colorado.  The lady that owns the store has a daughter with Celiac’s Disease and she has converted all of her bakery recipes to a gluten free version and self-published them in a recipe book called The Floured Apron.  When I was traveling through PS I stopped in there to have brunch and her GF cinnamon rolls were to die for.  Couldn’t tell the difference from wheat rolls.  I was so impressed with them that I purchased her book and have not regretted it.  It’s a great resource for GF baking.  Unfortunately, I don’t have the address or phone number to publish, but it shouldn’t be that hard to find.

    Thanks for looking into this.  Most people think that gluten free is hard and requires lots of exotic ingredients, but once you get into it, it’s really not that back.  Just a bit of practice and you can live GF fairly easy.

    • Alicia

      I have searched the web over and I found a “yelp” post about the bakery. I called the number but there was no answer and no answering machine. Did you purchase an actual cookbook?

  • MiKail

    I’ve been thinking about food restrictions and food storage a lot lately – my son has PKU, a disorder where he can only eat fruits, vegetables, and some specialty grains and pastas.  It’s made me rethink my whole food storage, because not only will I have to stock up on things for me and my husband, but I’ll have to make sure our son has his own supply of his food.  Right now it’s easy because he’s still drinking formula, but it’s never too early to start thinking about it!  Thanks for the tips!